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Using a CDN can be both a burden and a benefit to a website, all depending on how it has been implemented. Positive Points Static content stored closer to the end user (faster loading times) Additional sub-domains (cdn1.domain.com, cdn2.domain.com, etc), this assists with the inherit limit in browsers limiting file downloads to two simultaneous files from ...


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Use a CDN if you need a CDN. If your user is global and spread over a large area, or you have a lot of such content that you don't want to store on your own server, that is when a CDN is useful. Globally, it can speed up access to your content if the server is closer to the user. If you have many GB or Terabytes of static data and a heavy load for access to ...


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Using a CDN vs traditional web hosting for delivering your static files such as CSS, JS, and images is commonly preferred. This is because once your files are cached on the CDN's edge servers, your site visitors will be delivered static content from the closest point of presence (PoP) instead of the origin server. In the majority of cases, this shortens ...


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The CDN should be used for all static files (.css/.js/images). Sometimes however javascript or css files can have dynamic aspect to them such as that it would include a unique user string or something of that sort. In this situation the CDN server would have to contact the origin server on every request which would defeat the purpose. If your CSS and ...



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