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13

There are 2 main ways to prevent search engines from indexing specific pages: A Robots.txt file for your domain. The Meta Robots tag on each page. Robots.txt should be your first stop for URL patterns that match several files. You can see the syntax here and more detailed here. The robots.txt file must be placed in the root folder of your domain, i.e. at ...


7

In the root of the directory of the subdomain website, add a file called robots.txt containing: User-agent: * Disallow: / This will tell web crawlers not to index the site at all. They do not have to obey, but the main ones will.


6

(I work with Google's crawling & indexing teams) Let's start with the easy one: assuming you don't want these files used for indexing at all, you can just use the robots.txt file to disallow crawling of the scripts and responses. This prevents Googlebot from accessing the URLs, and would of course also prevent it from using them for anything else. The ...


5

There are various theories as to how Google knows what to crawl. It could be that someone linked to your mobile version. It could be that Google tried random urls and came across the /m version of your site. I'm not aware that they say they won't use URLs from their analytics data. Yes they do follow those rules: ...


4

No. Read this(all of it; there's a lot of useful stuff), though of particular relevance here: Google no longer recommends blocking crawler access to duplicate content on your website, whether with a robots.txt file or other methods. [...] Duplicate content on a site is not grounds for action on that site unless it appears that the intent ...


4

If you mean this post, Google found it just fine when I searched for it. Considering you only posted it today, that's pretty good. I would've recommended using XML sitemaps and the HTTP ping feature to minimize indexing delays, but it looks like you're already using a plugin that does that. To be honest, I can't think of anything else to suggest — ...


4

Yoast answers this very well in this blog post: A better solution would be to add a <meta name="robots" content="noindex, follow"> tag to those search results pages, as it would prevent the search results from rankings but would allow the link “juice” to flow through to the returned posts and pages. Someone will inevitably link to a page you wish ...


4

From https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/156184?hl=en Sitemaps are a way to tell Google about pages on your site we might not otherwise discover. This means you don't need a sitemap if you don't want Google to discover anything. Having a sitemap won't do anything so I wouldn't make one at all.


4

Yes. Eric Enge: Can a NoIndex page accumulate PageRank? Matt Cutts: A NoIndex page can accumulate PageRank, because the links are still followed outwards from a NoIndex page. Eric Enge: So, it can accumulate and pass PageRank. Matt Cutts: Right, and it will still accumulate PageRank, but it won't be showing in our Index. So, I ...


3

Using a robots.txt file in your subdomain will help (and Google will obey this), but another step you can take is to specify with a Google Webmasters account that you don't want this subdomain to be indexed. You can also use a meta tag on all pages in the subdomain: <meta name="robots" content="noindex"> If this happens to be a site that you ...


3

You only really have one page in the site and that page doesn't have a great deal of content on it. I appreciate there is an about page, but that isn't coded properly and has no meta description so google is ignoring it. My advice would be:- Write more content (game tutorials, a blog, high score pages and so on) Make sure your HTML is well formed and SEO ...


3

Even if you use nofollow PageRank is still "lost" to those links even if those pages don't actually get it . So you won't be accomplishing anything by doing this.


3

If multiple page URLs produce the same content then that's exactly what <link rel="canonical"> is for. It's for telling the search engines that the content of multiple URLs are the same and to use that specific one as the primary one. That avoids duplication issues altogether and is very simple to do.


3

The problem is that you are using noindex on your pages, see line:97 when viewing the source of your page. See below: Line 96: <meta name="description" content="xxxx" /> Line 97: <meta name="robots" content="noindex,nofollow" /> Line 98: <meta name="googlebot" content="noarchive" />


3

The surest way to get those pages out of index is to use this in the HTML head section: <meta name="robots" content="noindex" /> Sometimes Google indexes some URLs (but not the content) despite the Disallow in robots.txt. See my answer to this question for details.


3

Yoast discusses why this setting exists on his site. If your archive pages have any kind of static content or introduction, you run the risk of that content getting indexed on the second and subsequent pages of your archive and a dupe penalty applied. If you don't have that intro text, users get dumped into your older posts and may not have any real idea ...


3

To prevent Google to index your documents but let bots crawl your documents (for SEO purposes), you can put these following lines in your .htaccess (if you use Apache as a web server). It will give weight to tell to Google to index your webpages and not your documents. <Files ~ "\.pdf$"> Header set X-Robots-Tag "noindex" </Files> With ...


3

Perhaps a very non-user friendly site-map?


3

You should prevent Google from crawling site search pages. Google doesn't want to crawl your site search at all. Here is Google's Matt Cutts blog post about the issue: Search results in search results by Matt Cutts on March 10, 2007. Google now actively penalizes sites that allow their site search results to be crawled and appear in Google's SERPs. By ...


3

Days, Weeks and Months... It can take Google days, weeks and even months for Google to remove pages marked noindex, robots and 404's. Generally it takes Google several crawls before Google acts on the new information of a page. User Errors It should be also noted that more than often users make human errors and create 404's, noindexs and so forth by ...


3

The noindex should be enough to stop it getting indexed. With regards to iframes and linking, I can't actually find any guidelines from Google. In fact, all they seem to officially say on the entire subject of iframes is "Google supports frames and iframes to the extent that it can." You would need to link to the article you mention for its context, but I ...


3

It makes a difference. The bots do this: Go to noindex.html. Crawl it, check it, do all the usual checks, get all internal links Don't index this page, because rel="noindex" Repeat for each internal link As you can see, it still follows all internal links, it just doesnt index no-index.html. This means internal-linked-page.html will get found, crawled ...


3

TLDR; No So, for example, if I send noindex for my jQuery script, so Google would not be able to use them to load Ajax, I suppose it is not good for my site's SEO, right? No, you seem confused what NOINDEX actually does. NOINDEX: Allows crawling, following the links in it. Disallows indexing (which would automatically include NOARCHIVE and ...


3

You should not use both noindex and rel=canonical, because noindex won't let pages pass any PageRank to its canonical version. rel="canonical" is a hint, not a directive, so Google will decide which page to take and show in search results. Here are posts at seroundtable, there they cite John Mueller's comments, from Google: No, you should not ...


2

No, you should not stop search engines from indexing pagination or tags pages. (And definitely not your index page!) For blogs or sites without a clear menu structure, that is the main way they will find your content. More often than not the search engines can work out those pages just fine, and discover your most important content i.e. the blog entries ...


2

I would think that the you are just not ranking that high with the words in your title. There are a lot of links to sites like "Global Thermonuclear War", "online war game", and things like that that are ranking above your site.


2

Or should I use rel="canonical" for the promotion page? No, only use canonical for pages with (almost) identical content. Your promotion list page and an individual promotion are clearly different pages. What I do is use "noindex, follow" for the links. Is that a good idea? I think you shouldn't disallow the indexing. Search engines can be very ...


2

Yes. Google Custom Search uses the indexed pages in Google, usually filtered for your domain. If you do not index your pages (noindex) CSE can't return them as a result.


2

The fact that a page is being served up with a 404 error means that responsible web indexes will not be storing the 404 page itself anyway. That is what the HTTP status code is for - the number 404 isn't there for the user's benefit! As far as removing the original page from an index, it would be better to make resources which are truly gone return an ...


2

Solutions from Kenzo and Paul are good, you can put meta tags noindex on your web pages and add robots.txt to disallow robots. But in my opinion, the best solution is to use password authentification on your sub domain. This is the only solution you're sure robots can access and index your web site. If you use Apache, you can implement htpasswd.



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