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13

An alternative method of doing this is to use breadcrumbs. Not only do they give your users an easy way to go back, but they show the hierarchy of the content which makes it easier for the user to find what they're looking for. Plus they're good for SEO as they: create a natural hierarchy of pages interlink your pages with good anchor text when used with ...


10

It depends on how it looks on your website. Unless your navigation is already crowded, I don't see any harm in having a home link. Even if you do have a home link, I would still have the logo link to the home page as well.


8

The question is really "are your users comfortable using the browser's back button?". If they are then leave the link off your pages. If not then you need to keep it there. The only way you are going to find this out is by testing the different pages and see which ones your users prefer.


7

I manage a website for a manufacturing and engineering firm. We have both a text Home link and the company logo is a link to the home page. Using Crazy Egg stats I can tell you we get more clicks on the text link to home than the Logo link to home. In general, it depends on your user base. Are they computer savvy? Will they figure it out on their own? ...


6

It is a convention which was popularised by the text editor vi, precursor to Vim. To quote Stack Overflow user martin clayton from this highly related (but not exact duplicate) question Bill joy, who wrote the visual mode of ex - which ended up being vim precursor vi - used a Lear Siegler ADM3A terminal on which the H, J, K, L keys mapped to left, down, ...


5

If you don't have links to those pages then search engines won't be able to find them as they typically do not submit forms or follow JavaScript. To compensate for this you should make sure you have an XML sitemap linking to those pages so they can find them. I would also make an HTML sitemap that does this as well. You may also want to consider creating ...


5

In general it's best to have ordinary text links to those pages somewhere on the site, if not for SEO then for accessibility reasons. A portion of users will not have Flash or have it disabled through FlashBlock etc. For a site I completed recently we did something similar with a map of the UK. I put links to the cities (only 5 at the moment) underneath the ...


5

Usability and SEO. Much of the information in footers is the standard contact us, faq, location, etc. This makes it easy for a visitor to find this information rather than hunt down some hidden link. Also SEO. It places their Facebook, Tweets, etc. in the footer so that Google can pick up on what keywords they want to feature.


5

Is such link really helpful? As ChrisF noted, this is entirely dependent upon whether or not your site's audience benefits from the feature. How is it better than just a browser "Back" button? Most implementations look like this: <a href="#" onClick="javascript:history.go(-1);">back</a> The practice of hard-coding a Javascript ...


5

You should have everything on one site with a home page where users can click on a link for the year they are interested in. Why not Wikipedia-style? On your home page you could have info about the current or upcoming conference or news about the participants/speakers. You could redirect the years to sub-folders on your server. The URL structure would be ...


5

Your resident SEO expert has valid points, but they're all circumstantial. Decreased keyword density for the words being targeted in the URL, the longer the URL the less emphasis is being placed on the keywords being targeted in the URL This is an important factor if you have a url like mysite.com/solutions/healthcare/benefits/etc/etc/. But just ...


4

The concept of the "SEO Footer" is a pretty lame and old technique, but not all SEO Footers are created equal. The mint.com footer, many tiny links, almost the same color as the template, is lame and verging on grey hat. The arstechnica footer is totally logical / ethical / usable / whatever. You can tell that mint.com is pretty aggressively SEO'd - 90 ...


4

You could take a leaf out of Facebook's... erm, book... and does and make it so that when you hover over the logo a "home" icon comes up (assuming they still do that; I barely use Facebook anymore). It makes it clear that clicking the logo returns to the home page.


4

Another good place to use an explicit home link in user navigation is the first entry in a breadcrumb trail. Since this is often near the top of the page, the home link usually ends up just below the main logo, so it serves both as a text link to the home page and the root of the breadcrumb trail. If your site layout is at all hierarchical, a breadcrumb ...


4

Well, I'm a developer/programmer/coding guy. This means, I always go for some information about design before answer such questions. I like Jakob Nielsen's articles, because they research before posting. http://www.useit.com/alertbox/mega-dropdown-menus.html http://www.useit.com/alertbox/navigation-menu-alignment.html ...


4

It's not a common convention to display a drop down menu under a Home link, so it's probably better to avoid it. Navigation is best presented as a distinct and obvious list of links, not a hidden area that only a small portion of your audience may discover. Some would go further and argue that no 'Home button' is needed at all; it is a common convention to ...


4

(If this isn't just an abstract idea and you have an actual situation to deal with at the moment, maybe you should narrow the question down a bit with that.) Generally speaking the "home" concept only has a single function that reasonably goes along with it. I don't think I've ever seen a home menu item with sub-items, but any rule in UI design tends to ...


4

Here's a very through discussion on the topic from back in 08, of course by now Google is a completely different animal. Firstly a very large percentage of the web would have a problem if they were being negatively affected by having drop down menu's, content rollups (look at the right of this page) and fat footers. Secondly Google has to use navigation ...


3

Every site is different. I manage a site that gets over 100k visits a month and we get about 2k searches over the same period of time. The amount of searches done is really a function of how many pages you have in your site, how easy your navigation is, how well you search works, and if you have long tail searches like people checking a government site for ...


3

Aside from space issues and the ease of scanning, there are a few other factors you should take into account: Horizontally-arranged menus (of horizontally arranged languages) means more mouse movement to get from one item to the next. However, it will be easier to go from a top-level menu item in a horizontal menu to its corresponding dropdown menu than it ...


3

This is more suited to Stack Overflow, but regardless... Like bpeterson said, it sounds like a relative path problem with the CSS/JS. This is easily fixed by starting all URLs with a leading slash and putting the path from the site root. For example, if a file is at: yoursite.com/css/ECM_HelpFile.css You can include it with: <link ...


3

I highly recommend the book Information Architecture for the World Wide Web Which covers a lot of really good UI design topics on web navigation.


3

Such 'back' links are not useful. As stated in the question, they merely repeat a function already available in the browser. More importantly, however, unlike the browser back button, users may be surprised by its behavior. For example, they might not expect to be sent back to Google when clicking a link on your site if they arrived there via a search. Such ...


2

If you gave a link to your site, we could help a whole lot more. Pros Top navigation gives your content more width. It doesn't tie up valuable width space of the page. Top navigation is easier for a visitor to find and understand If done correctly, Mega Menus provide a great way to cram a lot of information in top menus. ...


2

If I was a betting man, I'd say that the links you provided inside your navigation html are trying to go relative to the URL of the page your're including it from. To test, change the links to absolute (http://www...) and see if they work...if they do, then you know what the problem is. When I'm confused about includes, I'll load the page and view source. ...


2

If i submit all my products using an XML sitemap, are the links necessary? Or are they just excess? It depends on how many products you have. If it's a manageable number (say, in the thousands) then a sitemap of all products should suffice. In that case, you don't need to worry too much about the navigation links too much but, in principle, the simpler ...


2

This is a bit speculative as you don't mention what CMS/cart/whatever you're using, if any, but it sounds like you feel you're forced to always display links for all pages. There are other design patterns for pagination links of the type you're describing that you could explore, eg. 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 |5 ... 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 ... where once you reach page ...


2

I would leave the one active that you came to the View Employee page from. So if you'd got there from Employee Management, then that tab would be active.


2

If you're running an e-commerce site, try having a broken search function sometime and read the feedback. I don't have statistics at hand, but I can tell you that a lot of people use the search as the first attempt at going direct to an item, rather than go through the category navigation, even when the category navigation has the same two click to product ...



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