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There are several tools available for this. Just to name a few: http://mxtoolbox.com/DNSLookup.aspx http://viewdns.info/dnsrecord/ http://viewdns.info/ http://www.dnswatch.info/ https://www.ultratools.com/tools/dnsLookup http://dns-record-viewer.online-domain-tools.com/ If you want to do this on the command line, try using dig. Example command: dig ...


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It depends. If you just added an A record for that domain, then yes, you would change the nameservers for that domain too. But some registrars only allow you to register a subdomain as a new domain. Then no, you wouldn't change the nameservers for that domain. It's safe to say that not many registrars require the last answer though.


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simply you can set "A" record at your domain's DNS hosting provider. Assuming the primary domain name uses name servers that point to the cPanel server, you can modify the "A" record for the subdomain in it's DNS Zone via the "Simple DNS Zone" option. this article may be useful for you : http://css-tricks.com/put-a-subdomain-on-a-different-server/


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In order to resolve a name for the public Internet, name servers must be designated as authoritative for a domain that they serve records for. This designation is done at the domain registrar; they usually have control panels for NS records. A name server can serve records for a domain for which it is not authoritative, but only users querying it directly or ...


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You said you would like to forward your domain, so go to GoDaddy's domain control center, click on the domain, look for where it says forwarding and then fill out the IP address of your VPS there. Also be sure to make sure the name servers are not set to custom but the default GoDaddy ones.


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• Check if your DNS records are correct mydomain.com A xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx (Ipv4) mydomain.com AAAA xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx:xxxx (IpV6) mysubdomain.mydomain.com CNAME mydomain.com (Alias) See Create and configure DNS records for a domain on my blog for more information. • Flush your operating system's DNS cache ipconfig /flushdns (Windows) ...


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If the A records have been updated properly, try clearing the network/DNS cache on your local machine and see if it resolves the domain/subdomain to server IP address. If you are on a Windows machine, use the command below to clear the network/DNS cache: ipconfig /flushdns


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Different DNS entries and delegations have different TTLs (Time To Live). A typical TTL for a full domain (something.com) is 24 hours. You can directly query the new authoritative DNS server directly if he has the intended records at all: dig @newdns.server.com www.yoursite.com Should give you an IP to the new host of your site, regardless of caching. ...



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