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14

Answering a question similar to yours on his blog, Matt Cutts suggests: If you have sites with say French and German versions for a business, my preferences would be: ccTLDS such as example.fr or example.de After than, subdomains such as fr.example.com or de.example.com. If that’s not possible, I’d use subdirectories such as ...


11

In my opinion, you should use either the folder or subdomain approach, because they are more intuitive to the user. Which one is a matter of personal taste, I personally find the folder approach clearer. The filename option is far less intuitive. Parsing the Accept-Language header for directing the user to the correct content on his first visit is a good ...


8

As a German user I hate it when a website won't let me on the English page because it's think it knows better what I want. It might be hard for Americans to understand but there are actually people who speak more than one language. Sometimes I might want to view the German websites and sometimes I might want to view the English one. Simply parsing the ...


7

Declaring Language in XHTML and HTML The W3 describes how to formally declare the language of your web pages: http://www.w3.org/International/tutorials/language-decl/ Add a content-language meta tag to the head block of each page. <meta http-equiv="content-language" content="en"> ...or... <meta http-equiv="content-language" content="es"> ...


6

I'm going to try and answer all three questions at once: If you really want to "optimize" your domains then have each domain live, accessible (non-directed), hosted in their own counties, with their own carefully translated content based on the language of that country. Costly. If you want to keep things as simple as possible (like Apple), then pick the ...


5

This is the same question I asked on StackOverflow. And I got a recource for it, ill post the answer. I have found a nice resource from Google on the choices you can make. There is a section with pros and cons of each method you can use. I have been struggling with the multi-lingual websites for a while now. There are definitely some points in the article ...


5

From Google Webmaster Tools Support page on Multi-region and multilingual sites Managing multilingual versions of your site Make sure the page language is obvious Google uses only the visible content of your page to determine its language. We don’t use any code-level language information such as Lang attributes. You can help Google ...


4

You could turn this question on its head; let's say you land on the page, and the current language is Russian; which of these do you pick to get to something you understand? французский английский итальянский русский From a usability perspective, I'd say that the language names should always be in their native languages, over the current language.


4

Use subdomain option if you use localized versions (i.e. France != French). Use subdomains, but I think it's better use directories if this country uses diferent languages. For example: us.domain.com (USA) us.domain.com/en/sample.html (USA - english) us.domain.com/es/ejemplo.html (USA - spanish) es.domain.com (Spain) es.domain.com/es/ejemplo.html (Spain - ...


4

You need to give the translated versions separate URLs if you want Google to index them. From Google's "Working with multilingual websites" blog post: To make all of your site's content more crawlable, avoid automatic redirections based on the user's perceived language. These redirections could prevent users (and search engines) from viewing all ...


4

I believe the problem might be due to auto redirecting the root url ('/') or automatically setting the language, should I exclude robots somehow? Correct. Googlebot et al don't send an Accept-Language header, or accept cookies, so it'll see whatever the site defaults to without it, which would appear to be English in this case. You can verify this using ...


4

The Googlebot can submit forms, but it generally doesn't unless it can detect a reason to do so. So from the links, if your translations were AJAX'd and built properly, Googlebot may very well submit the form to see what the results would be. However, this behavior (especially on POST), is not guaranteed and you should probably use GET to make things more ...


4

It's my understanding that we at Google don't use any of the language meta-information within PDF files. You can, however, use the hreflang information via HTTP header or Sitemaps file for non-HTML content too.


4

Definitely keep the <link> tags in your <head> section. I've never read anywhere that Google actually acknowledges rel="alternate" on <a> tags. Also many other bots may only retrieve the <head> of your documents, so if those <link> tags aren't in the header, they may never actually see them. But I don't think that having the ...


3

You're going about it the wrong way. The proper way to set up a multilingual site is, as toomanyairmiles' links outline, to set up different localized subsites, either in separate directories or subdomains, e.g. en.example.com / example.com/en/ de.example.com / example.com/de/ Google will recognize each subsite's targeted locale based on the content. ...


3

I think you are on the right track here. There are a few ways I've seen this done: Have the www.domain.com/index.html page be a simple language selection page with only links to the en and es home pages. Personally I find this annoying, but I still see it all the time. Just sent everyone to the english version and have a link from there to the spanish ...


3

You need to include the "/" URL in your Sitemap file and specify it as the hreflang "x-default". That way, Google will know that this is a part of your set of pages, and will be able to handle it appropriately. Note that hreflang is a signal, and not a directive for Google, so it might be that the "/" URL still occasionally shows up.


2

I would not use subdomains. In terms of SEO it's less helpful: http://www.hobo-web.co.uk/seo-blog/index.php/blog-subdomain-or-subfolder-which-is-best/. Similar talk here: Subdomain versus subdirectory. If you look at big sites, the most often use subdomains. It also depends if your business is more of a global or local nature. We are a copyrighting ...


2

<meta http-equiv="content-language" content="ll-cc"> what is this John Conde is correct that it should be included as part of the tag, but there's also the important consideration of ensuring that it's included as part of the HTTP Headers. Most Meta elements are redundant replacements or over-rides for information that should be sent as part of the ...


2

The full answer to the question is answered by the W3C here: http://www.w3.org/International/questions/qa-http-and-lang.en @John Conde is correct that it should be included as part of the <html> tag, but there's also the important consideration of ensuring that it's included as part of the HTTP Headers. Most Meta elements are redundant replacements ...


2

You shouldn't set the language using the browser language, that's not really reliable. For example I'm using firefox in english but I'm french and most of the pages that I visit are written in French. Anyway, there is a line in the header of the http protocol called Accept-Language.This field depends on the browser that you use and is calculated from the ...


2

Everything I can find suggests that the HTTP referrer is preserved through a 301 redirect. EDIT: Tested this in Internet Explorer 8, Firefox, Chrome and Opera and they all pass the original referrer through a 301 redirect. However if you're sure that's not happening in your case, it appears you may be able to (unofficially) override the referrer in GA ...


2

Yes, they do. Although each search engine is different, the obvious ones (Google, Bing) do use language recognition algorithms. A clear example is when you visit a foreign site on Google Chrome the browser will recognise the language is not your own and will ask you whether you want to translate it. Having said that, language and country aer very different ...


2

Picking up an old question, because it's still relevant and common :-) ... In general, you won't be "penalized" for anything like this, provided you use real translations and don't use automatic translations to create other versions of your content. The thing that's important for search engines is that you have unique URLs per language. It doesn't matter if ...


2

I think you'd need a domain for each region which is locked to it's local country with google webmaster tools, but here's an article from google on how to tackle the problem. http://googlewebmastercentral.blogspot.com/2008/08/how-to-start-multilingual-site.html http://googlewebmastercentral.blogspot.com/2010/03/working-with-multilingual-websites.html I'm ...


2

i think the proper way would be: when user accesses site, get his language from browser using javascirpt present the user with what you've found, askig to confirm. than save to session. when the language is set in the session, give back the content in the language, no matter what url the client is visiting google / bots etc. sould not interprete the ...


2

If duplicating the image really is unnecessary then you could still perhaps have the best of both worlds... only store the image once, but have it referenced by different filenames, for the different languages - using mod_rewrite (Apache) and an internal rewrite. Based on unor's example: example.net/img/en/house.png example.net/img/es/casa.png These ...


2

The problem with your set-up (from an SEO standpoint) is that search engines don't accept cookies, so whenever a bot follows a link to your root domain, it'll be sent to your English content. Hopefully there's an abundance of links to the other language content, too, but in my experience this situation nevertheless seems to lie at the root of a lot of ...



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