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-1

Get a .mobi domain just for the mobile website


0

On websites you have three main ways to specify fonts. You can specify fonts that are installed on a person's computer, you can use a font service to pull in a custom font, or you can pull in specific fonts you want.


4

I would say try using media queries first. One method I found easier when dealing with a design that was originally only for desktop was this: Start with two separate stylesheets. One for the new responsive design, and the other for the old desktop version: <link rel="stylesheet" media="screen and (max-width: 959px)" href="css/mobile.css"> <link ...


3

I worked on a site that used that method, and I had problems with screen rotation on mobile devices. Since JavaScript will only detect once on page load, if the user rotates the device it won't expand to the full width the way it will with media queries. It was easier for me at the time just to switch to CSS, but perhaps a JS expert would know if there's a ...


3

Responsiveness and "appear correctly on smart phones" are completely different tasks. Presumably, responsiveness refers to eliminating--where possible--extra round trips to the server. Error checking, Ajax to retrieve requested data, and dynamic DOM manipulation are the tasks that typically improve responsiveness. The use of JavaScript (or JavaScript ...


1

We used to used the popular 960.gs css framework for our sites. We wanted to make it responsive. Someone had made a JS based responsive plugin for the 960 gs so we thought hay why not just use that as we would not have to make any changes to the structural site templates. It worked but was laggy in most browsers including the good ones. You would ...


12

Sure. Obviously, it would be better to use CSS alone but if you can't, use what you have. Do as much as you can with CSS and use JS as needed. Not sure why you can't change the existing CSS but you can add a style sheet with JS. (function() { //create a new element var newStyle = document.createElement("link"); //set the required attribute for a ...


1

It shows OK on my iPhone. I checked the demo page of this theme (justblue) on my phone and the only major difference I noticed is the non-responsive adsense block on mobile causing some trouble with responsiveness. You can try disabling that block for mobile devices or using a responsive block instead.


0

Open Sans, Oswald, Droid Sans are in the Top 3 respectively. Roboto Family is upcoming widely used font. Among the above, Droid Sans & Oswald seems to cover moderately among all the browsers. All data are taken from Google Fonts analytics, refer it, change the filters & check it for yourself. I would go with Open Sans as Oswald renders badly ...


4

This is a subject that could end up on discussions, but I'd say; considering the widespread use of Windows, the agreements that Apple has with Microsoft, the early versions distributed from Microsoft and the different ways to install fonts on Linux, that the best options, are the Core fonts for the Web from Microsoft. Specifically the Georgia and Verdana. ...


1

I am usually going to say Verdana for the most common font people use, for the ease of reading. As for web design, you can assign a font to your CSS StyleSheets using Google Fonts and how to use them, if you want it to be 'globalized' between all devices.


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Luca Passani, WURFL inventor here. My company recently launched this service which pretty much soves the problem discussed here free of charge. I advise you check out http://wurfl.io/ In a nutshell, if you import a tiny JS file: <script type='text/javascript' src="//wurfl.io/wurfl.js"></script> you will be left with a JSON object that looks ...



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