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17

There is a round-up of them on Mashable (second section). iBBDemo2 — This Adobe Air app will let you see content as it would appear on the iPad and on the iPhone. Support for Android is reportedly coming soon. The app is a bit slow but it does a good job showing accurate results for iOS devices. Just point the app towards your test mobile site. ...


14

Mobile to desktop version should be a choice the user initiates. Sometimes the user may want the mobile version due to: 1) A focused and less cluttered experience 2) Faster browsing for low-bandwidth users (e.g. laptop with a 3G connection) 3) Ability to fit on a small screen Whatever the reason, I don't think deciding for your users is right. Let the ...


12

Sure. Obviously, it would be better to use CSS alone but if you can't, use what you have. Do as much as you can with CSS and use JS as needed. Not sure why you can't change the existing CSS but you can add a style sheet with JS. (function() { //create a new element var newStyle = document.createElement("link"); //set the required attribute for a ...


8

If you're building a mobile site, then you are entering a world of pain! Seriously. I have spent a year as project manager on mobile web portal projects, and the browser bugs and platform differences are orders of magnitude worse than full-PC web application development. The first thing I will say is: Look carefully at the business case. There is a ...


8

Unless I missed something I do not believe this is automatic. These sites have made a special mobile versions of their site and are redirecting them there automatically through code on their servers. If you know PHP there is a handy PHP code generator that will create the code for depending on your exact needs. This site seems to offer many more languages. ...


8

As defined by Ethan Marcotte in ALA 306, the term "responsive design" refers to the technique of applying differing style rules to your HTML depending on user screen size. For more explanation of responsive design, here's a nice deck by Mike Bollinger. In this model, you send the exact same HTML to the client whether the screen is small or large. However, ...


8

Probably not. It is likely that the QR code simply encodes the URL. There is not likely to be any further information contained in it that would enable you to detect that the referral came from a QR code, and the User-Agent: string is likely to be that of the web browser that the URL was passed to rather than the QR code scanner program. See also ...


8

The best course of action is to use canonical URLs. This avoids a situation where you are penalized for duplicate content. When it comes to desktop vs mobile websites, most sites will have something like this on their mobile website: Example for: http://m.mywebsite.com/page.html <link rel="canonical" href="http://mywebsite.com/page.html" /> The ...


7

You will definitely have to build your own redirect. It really depends on you language as to how to do it. Also, this was asked on SO a while back, here. Check out WURLF as the SO answer suggests. When you make the redirect you will want to make sure to use a 302 Redirect.


7

Note: Not a direct answer, but IMO a valuable contribution. Of course this answer is dependent on your requirements, but I think many readers developing for consumers will find it useful and relevant, especially in the future. To such a fine degree, I don't. Of course, user-agent detection is great to serve an optimized mobile version for devices with ...


7

For the iPhone in particular you should consider configuring the viewport, which controls the scale at which your page will get rendered. This is especially useful if your site is significantly narrower than the default viewport width of 980px. You can do this with a meta tag: <meta name = "viewport" content = "width = 590"> You can also set the ...


7

If you can, the best option is to use responsive design, and make your site work well in all modern mobile devices in the same domain/url. However there are some situations where a different site is a better option, like for example when most of your audience has old mobile equipment, you think your users will prefer a different experiences or heavy use of ...


7

In my experience, mobile visitors want the same content as your desktop visitors do. I worked for a travel website with lots of information about hotels and restaurants. The site is generally known for hotels, but we thought that mobile users would be much more interested in restaurant content because they we looking for something when they were out. ...


6

Mobile browser market share StatCounter offers a rough indication of mobile browser usage share in their Top Mobile Browsers from Sept 2010 to Sept 2011 chart, which Wikipedia has made sense of in this table. Ranked from most to least popular: iPhone + iPod Touch (22.84%) Opera Mini (22.24%) Android (20.21%) Nokia (12.57%) BlackBerry (9.51%) UC Browser ...


6

Unfortunately, having the same content on a mobile page would be considered a duplicate. This is among the few legitimate sources of inevitable content duplication, along with syndicated content and news/blog homepages. But if you just have a single URL for each page and simply switching the CSS based on cookies, then there's really only one page. This is ...


6

Resizing during a session, or actual browser window size vs screen size? It's impractical (See @JacobHume's comment below) to tell if a user is changing the window size while browsing but Chris Coyier over at CSS Tricks has come up with a way to track the window size onLoad, (results below) and zachstronaut has a similar method using Google Analytics. ...


5

With more and more phones with higher resolution, good browser scaling and normal javascript/css support it's much less needed to make a special version of your site for mobile. Make sure you don't rely on :hover and you will do fine I guess. There is a good article on A list apart about fluid layouts which fit for all devices, take a look: ...


5

You can use Safari with select menu : Develope -> User Agents -> Iphone/iPod/ iPad to Simulate testing in iPhone/ iPod/ iPad device. In Firefox, you can add plugin FireMobileSimulator to simulate testing in some specific Japan mobile (Docomo, Softbank, ...)


5

A big site I worked on before tried a few different ways of user-agent sniffing with redirects that proved to be a bit slow when dealing with millions of users. We also ended up needing to provide a link to the mobile site anyway, for those users where user-agent sniffing failed. They ended up just using a prominent link to the mobile site, and encouraging ...


5

It's a good idea to wrap phone numbers in tel URIs because: Mobile browsers often parse numbers incorrectly, especially with unusual formats. All they're doing is attempting to wrap phone numbers in anchor links and tel URIs; doing it for them reduces the chance of error. It's a vendor-neutral, official proposed standard that desktop VOIP phone clients ...


5

Personally I am a fan of the one domain approach like you are doing but just thought I would also provide few more considerations to add to the already good advice given by others here. SEO is a major reason for going with two domains OR one. Two domains = two seperate marketable sites and one can be posted in app market places. On the other hand you're ...


5

MP3 MP3 is the most popular format and it's supported by most of phones, including Android, Windows Phone, Symbian... iPhone? m4r iPhone apparently uses another format, M4R, as I understand it's just a regular iTunes AAC with a different extension. It's very easy to convert an MP3 to iPhone ringtone. see this What to do You can either add two ...


4

OMG, are you really keeping your own database up to date? I'm so sorry about you... First tip: If you only need a very simple and minimal solution to detect brand and model, go with WURFL if you want it for free or DeviceAtlas if you can afford it. The second one works probably better (just my personal opinion). Also, take a look at this comparision ...


4

It sounds like your implementation is quite flawed. You should research best practice methods for serving mobile optimized content (using device detection - not cloaking, canonical link element) etc, rather trying to band-aid your current situation. Try looking at: https://www.google.com/support/webmasters/bin/answer.py?answer=35312 ...


4

You'd have to reprint the code, most QR readers launch the phone's browser so there is nothing for you to detect on the web front end to redirect the incoming link. Options:- Reprint the material Print stickers and literally sticker over the code (pain but we've all had to do it at some point) Redirect all mobile traffic to /code/ until you can reprint ...


4

To redirect only mobile traffic to a mobile domain there are a few options:- Simple Based on screen resolution (my favorite as it's fairly future proof) <script type="text/javascript"> <!-- if (screen.width <= 699) { document.location = "www.mobileurl.com"; } //--> </script> More granular control ...


4

The bandwidth shouldn't increase by that much. There's a bit of extra negotiation when an https connection is set up, and because encryption pads things out to a certain block size pages might get slightly bigger. The load times might increase because of the overhead in encrypting the page at your end and decrypting the page at the user's end. I can't say ...


4

Aside from SEO, one issue is what the Url 'looks' like when people use/print/send it around. If you're going to redirect people to m when they go to www if they're on a mobile device, and redirect people to www from m when they're not, then what have you achieved by using separate domains? AFAIK, there are no benefits. But the reason people have decided to ...


4

First of all, there's a 3rd option. You can serve a dedicated mobile site on separate URLs, e.g., m.example.com, or you can take an adaptive approach whereby mobile specific content is delivered on the same URLs as your "desktop" site. Which option is best for users? From a design and architecture point of view, which is best depends a lot on what your ...


4

No. Google does not even prioritise mobile sites on its mobile search. Just search for some big sites like Facebook or Wikipedia - it shows their regular sites, not mobile sites. That's not to say it won't change in the future. Furthermore, don't forget the user experience: if your site doesn't work well on mobile, users may go elsewhere.



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