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10

From practical experience we've found that beyond the usual 301 redirecting these following actions have resulted in a shorter (and on one occasion non-existent) Search Engine fluctuation: Time the migration well away from your domain name expiry/renewal, so there is little ambiguity over it being a different site Set all far-future HTTP expiry headers to ...


7

You can edit your hosts file in a way that this domain name points to different IP. For example in Windows the host file is in: \Windows\System32\drivers\etc\ In Ubuntu it is in: /etc/ So you find the file, open it with simple text editor, and write the new IP and the domain name. It must look something like: 92.152.175.86 mydomain.com


6

You need to find an FTP program that supports the FXP protocol and your two servers need to support it too: http://www.smartftp.com/support/kb/what-is-fxp-f14.html


6

Don't over-optimize. Make sure the pages all have unique page titles and descriptions. Make sure the title attributes (not to be confused with the <title> tag) don't just replicate what the text link says. Make sure the pages load as fast or faster, accessibility doesn't get worse, you use a XML sitemap... Also a good idea to do a full analysis of ...


6

If your wordpress.com blog uses a subdomain such as "example.wordpress.com" You would need to: Set up Google Webmaster tools for your wordpress.com blog (here's how). Set up your new self-hosted WordPress blog to use exactly the same permalink structure as the wordpress.com blog (don't worry, we'll fix this in a minute!). Export your content from the ...


5

If your URLs are changing be sure to do a 301 redirect so the search engines know that the old URL has moved to a new location and all incoming links for the old URL should be transferred to the new URL. A sample 301 redirect in .htaccess would look like this: redirect 301 /old.html http://www.example.com/new.html That's about all you can control when you ...


4

The technique you're looking for is called responsive design, utilizing CSS3, this approach allows the content layout and text sizing to change according to the user's browser window size or the screen resolution of their chosen device. Here are a few resources/links/ideas:- CSS Tricks is a great example of responsive design in action SpeckyBoy magazine ...


4

If you are changing page URLs and especially domain, be prepared to have a transition period during which the website will probably LOSE visits. Google is going to reprocess your entire site (even if you used 301 redirects), and it might take some time. If your customer looks at visits statistics you better warn him, because he might see a fast downturn in ...


3

A quick look at the web host you currently use shows that they only offer 2 hosting packages that are both less than $10/month. This is pretty much guaranteed to be shared hosting as VPS starts at at least $20/month on the extreme low end. So that means you probably don't have root access. That said, there's no reason the other host would need root access ...


3

In a standard linux (apache webserver) hosting environment it should be easier to get a php form and wordpress widget to work without tweaks. Without knowing what you did to make them work, it's difficult to answer your question. I've used hosts such as readyhosting.com that allow php to run on windows servers, but many hosts have better support for php ...


3

You could use an app like WebDrive, which mounts remote FTP drives as if they were local drives (called a 'virtual drive'), then simply drag and drop the files from one virtual drive to the other on your own machine. How it works Download WebDrive here. (Mac or Windows, free 20-day trial) Put in the FTP details for your 'http://abc.com' server to create ...


3

It is definitely possible to convert an existing site over. What SquareSpace can do for an existing site is give it a really nice front-end editor for layout, etc. However, while SquareSpace does host the site, they don't host databases. What that means is even if you move to SquareSpace, you'll still need to host your own customer database. As a result, ...


3

404s have no effect on PageRank per se, as PR is just a calculation of how many links are incoming to that page. However, 404s will have a small effect on the PageRank of the other pages on your site, as they will now have fewer links pointing to them. Since you have thousands of pages and sound like an established site, this effect will be negligible. ...


3

No, don't copy the tables - that schema has changed quite a bit. You can install the free JUpgrade extension, which will download and install a 2.5 into a subfolder of your website and populate the new DB with your content, categories, users, etc. It can also handle some 3rd party extensions like Community Builder, Virtuemart and Kunena. That's the official ...


3

If the HTML is different that will affect rankings as semantic markup definitely play sa ranking in the search engine's ranking algorithm. 301 redirects don't carry over all of the current pages' links value. A small percentage is lost. It takes a while for the 301 redirects to kick in. One or more of these factors can account for the rankings change.


3

A sitemap may help with indexing your new URL structure, but remember Google makes no promises they'll crawl or index everything in there at all. However, even if they did index everything in your sitemap, that would not magically make your crawl errors go away. 404(not found) errors explicitly allow for the possibility that the URL may be available again ...


3

It sounds like you've checked off the basic best practices: using 301 redirects and updating your XML Sitemap. The 301s are the crucial bit where preserving rankings is concerned, since Google will recognise the permanent nature of the redirection and transfer PageRank etc. Google's support pages on site migration cover this and some other areas of good ...


3

If you are using Wordpress now, and simply trying to redirect old Joomla urls to your new urls I suggest using a plugin to make your life easier. I recommend this plugin a lot: http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/redirection/ Also keep in mind that you should use fancy permalinks within Wordpress instead of the standard ID numbers. You can find this ...


3

Your regular expression has the following problems: It only has .* for the "site" and "sectionname", but is missing one for the "categoryname". Based on your example, there should be a third directory level in your regex. You have parenthesis around items which you don't need to reference, but no parenthesis around the ID, which you will need to ...


3

For example, do I need to worry about the MySQL databases themselves being compromised? Or if I manually move them would they be ok? Yes, you absolutely have to worry about the MySQL being compromised along with just about everything else. The best thing to do here is move as little as humanly possible to preserve the content. Plugins, themes, etc ...


2

The biggest thing is to make sure that you know what all your current URLs are and then redirect them to the new URLs using a 301 redirect when you redesign. You may find that your rankings take a slight dip temporarily, but don't panic, that can sometimes happen as Google readjusts itself to your site. Wait it out a few weeks before doing anything drastic. ...


2

My first question would be why the homepage needs to be HTTPS? What exactly is being secured that requires SSL on the homepage? If you've done a 301 redirect the next question would be whether or not you're indexed at the same rate. How many pages show up on a site:domain.com query for you? I'd also double check the 301 redirect to make sure using a ...


2

Having migrated a few CMS's before, the URLs are the biggest hurdles. Some other pain points are: Ensuring content mapping and content layout (in the HTML) isn't radically different - normally achieved by ensuring the templates are the same. Ensuring that meta data is correctly transferred - page titles, meta descriptions and other meta data - this may ...


2

Follow these instructions on moving WordPress, but use the root domain for references to your old subdomain instead of the /blog/ directory (I've made this change for you in the steps below): Create a robots.txt file in the root directory of the new domain with the following contents: User-agent: * Disallow: / Copy the database and files to the new ...


2

This should do it RewriteRule ^(.*)/(.*)/[0-9]\-(.*)$ http://yoursite.com/$1/$2/$3


2

An other option would be to get a webspace package. Then you don't need to care about the server, you only have to care about your blog. And updating wordpress is very easy and doesn't need much time. I think you also should consider that if you move your blog to a bloghoster you normally won't have the same control about your blog as you had when it was on ...


2

If URLs are exactly the same and the only difference is the domain name, then it is very easy to do. Just place this line in .htaccess in website root folder of www.somesite.com: Redirect 301 / http://www.someothersite.com/ The above rule will redirect (301 Permanent Redirect) ALL requests to a new domain using the same URL and preserving the query ...


2

Yes you need to do 301 redirect for all the old pages to the new page of your new website by doing so Google will pass on all the link equity from old Urls to new once and your rankings & traffic wont get affected; you may see some fluctuation in first two months then it will be all right. You can create sub folders for different countries or languages ...


2

Q1: No I don't think it is, unless your own site links to pages that 404, so I would check with a scanner like Xenu's link sleuth to ensure that there are no broken links on active pages. Q2: I would have the site return a 410 (Gone) status code for content that isn't going to return - google will understand and act accordingly. For simplicity you could ...


2

You should be able to build a script to do this if you are familiar with PHP and MySql. Basically you need to look at the database entries for each of the forums you mentioned, and match up the column names. Then you could create a PHP script to take the info from one, and enter it in the other. You would only need to copy over the information that relates ...



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