Hot answers tagged

8

Both are solutions for semantically annotating your content, but in very different ways: Microdata extends HTML5 (e.g., by introducing new attributes like itemprop), while Microformats only uses existing HTML mechanisms (like class and rel attributes). With Microdata, you can use almost any vocabulary (a popular one is Schema.org), with Microformats you ...


7

Google recommends using microdata, but it does support three formats: microdata, microformats, and RDFa. A big reason to choose microdata would be that the examples that Google gives on it's website and those on schema.org are in the microdata format. Here is a site that has a huge table of the various advantages and disadvantages of the three formats. ...


3

May be this example will help you <div itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/VisualArtwork"> <link itemprop="sameAs" href="http://rdf.freebase.com/rdf/m.0439_q" /> <h1 itemprop="name" lang="fr">La trahison des images </h1> <p> A <span itemprop="artform">painting</span> also known as &...


3

Here is your example HTML in the testing tool. Works perfectly fine for me, with everything you say is a problem recognized, and no warning: The example code from Google's docs does display the warning, but that's because of a syntax error which is breaking the markup: <img class="photo" src="anvil_executive.jpg /> Note the src attribute is ...


3

It means the page that link points to will contain a list of links to other pages that are tagged by the anchor text of that link. For example, if a link looked like this: <a href="/tags/seo" rel="tag">SEO</a> The microformat tells the search engine, and any other user-agent, that the URL /tags/seo contains links to documents (i.e. pages, etc) ...


2

My site had not yet had the rating and reviews index under my links, where other websites have and they use the bare minimum. Also, having the same micro formats on multiple pages affect this too? Just because you use microformats doesn't mean Google will automatically include rich snippets with your listing. Just like sitelinks they only do it ...


2

You need sufficient competition offering semantically extractable reviews on-line otherwise Google has nothing to compare your offerings with and won't display them. Try to get customers of your competitors to fill in local business reviews (especially if they had a bad time) this will help. Remember that this is made all the more difficult as you are ...


2

There is no schema entry for FAQ, you most likely best of adding it as a 'WebPage'. or using the about. It's not required to use rich snippets for all pages. It holds little SEO weight if any. Google will be able to establish it as a FAQ page without any markup of this type.


2

Use this format: Replace Organization with Place use <span itemprop="thing"> Home For Sale <div itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Organization"> <span itemprop="name">Beyond Window Cleaning</span> Located at: div itemprop="address" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/PostalAddress"> span itemprop="streetAddress"...


2

This issue is rather common and found in mostly poorly edited or made WordPress themes. entry-title, updated and author are all related to the Hatom markup which requires hentry to included above the fold and ideally in the body. It's likely that your website is missing author, updated and entry-title leaving hentry still within your code. View source and ...


2

Despite being (as of today) way too short for a subject like this, the Wikipedia article about Microdata (HTML5) still puts the relationship between the three common semantic markup approaches nicely: Microdata can be viewed as an extension of the existing microformat idea which attempts to address the deficiencies of microformats without the complexity ...


1

Got a website where hAtom feed is implemented correctly - with author, update, published - and a website where I have removed all hentry classes. I don't feel any difference, but seeing search console without errors brings me some satisfaction :D


1

Before structured data Google preferred microformats. They still do, but for things like last modified, quick overview of categories, site content update status, or other legacy knowns. It's almost real time, very quick index changes, with hubs to boot. Very much better to have these rather than ETAGS or 304 + AI trying to figure relevant changes. ...


1

Google has been promoting Schema.org as the preferred vocabulary for structured data. According to their Structured Data Policies: The data may be embedded in your webpage using any of three supported formats: JSON-LD, RDFa, and microdata. I seem to recall Google used to read Microformats as well but can no longer find reference to it in any of their ...


1

Showing content that you own in a couple places on your site will generally not hurt you. In the worst case, Google will not index one of the two places that content appears. Duplicate content can become an issue that can get your whole site in trouble when You have no content of your own, you are only syndicating content from other sources Much of your ...


1

The vocabulary Schema.org has the types Question and Answer (added in version 1.1 from 2014-04-04). This is not only for Q&A sites, but also for FAQs, as Question explicitly mentions (bold emphasis mine): A specific question - e.g. from a user seeking answers online, or collected in a Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) document.


1

I don't know of a microformat specifically for interviews, but you could combine definition lists (with the question as the term, the answer as the description) with Google's author markup.


1

I don't see why you have an issue with this. It's common to have identical information on multiple pages in HTML so why not microformats as well? If that same information was in an HTML table then you would include it on both places, right? As long as each ID is unique and you're not trying to manipulate the system or creating duplicate content I wouldn't ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible