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Last week’s Schema.org release (version 2.0) introduced two relevant properties: mainEntity mainEntityOfPage This allows you to omit WebPageElement (which is not very useful in the first place) and use something like this: <body itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/WebPage"> <!-- properties about the web page --> <div ...


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No, your example would mean that it’s an schema:Article and a pto:Dog_breed. To state what the schema:Article is about, you could use its about property. The elaborate version would be: <article itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Article"> <div itemprop="about" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Intangible"> <link ...


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I’m assuming you are using the vocabulary Schema.org and have something like this: <script type="application/ld+json"> { "@context": "http://schema.org", "@type": "LocalBusiness", "url": "http://example.com/" } </script> Here the url property belongs to the LocalBusiness item. So it should give the URI of the local business, no matter on ...


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I think the main entity should be Offer. This allows you to specify the prices and start/end dates. If you need to specify general data about the offered service/product, you could use the itemOffered property, which takes a Product as value. That’s fine, I guess, as Product is still defined to include both, products and services: Any offered product ...


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Your use of additionalType in the first snippet is correct. An example where additionalType is used can be seen on Schema.org’s IndividualProduct: <script type="application/ld+json"> { "@context": "http://schema.org", "@id": "#product", "@type": "IndividualProduct", "additionalType": "http://www.productontology.org/id/Racing_bicycle", ...


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Note that syntaxes like Microdata and RDFa don’t annotate the HTML, they use the HTML just as a carrier. After parsing the Microdata/RDFa, it doesn’t matter anymore which markup was used. If your two properties with the same content belong to the same item, it’s not useful to have the additional one, as it doesn’t add anything new (but it’s not forbidden ...


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As noted in this article, having duplicate content will result in bad SEO performance and possibly getting a page ranked so low it cannot be found by users. A critical aspect of SEO is quality content and you cannot maintain a good organic SEO position with duplicate content. Changing both content and HTML structure will be important to having both sites ...


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Search engines always hate duplicates if You have duplicate itemprop the bot must be confused to take which one for your markup result so avoid that markup once on the page


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From what I found, Google Structured Data Validation tool doesn't allow you to use PostalAddress for 'location' despite it being allowed by the schema. In here https://schema.org/location it's specifically said that 'location' can be either Place or PostalAddress. Given that the Place have attributes 'address' and 'name' and GSDVT is asking for them ...



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