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The rich snippets that you are talking about are pulled from the Google knowledge graph which allows certain rich content to be appended to the top search results where the Google algorithms deem it most appropriate. Google uses machine learning techniques to distinguish data from the structured layout of your page. As a webmaster you can use microdata to ...


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A reply to a comment is still classified a comment under the schema standard. Each comment and replies to those comments are still itemprop="comment"


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Something like this, though of course other properties are required for this to meet Google's requirements for article features in search results. <div itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Article"> <!-- blah blah --> <div itemprop="publisher" itemscope itemtype="https://schema.org/Organization"> <div itemprop="logo" itemscope ...


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I’m assuming that the Article can be rated, but it got no ratings yet. (If the Article can’t be rated, don’t specify aggregateRating.) Specifying aggregateRating and giving ratingCount the value 0 seems to be appropriate (but that’s, of course, not required, you could simply omit it). That way, a consumer might learn that the Article could have a rating and ...


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Schema.org expects an Organization item as value for the publisher property, but you provide a string value ("MyCorp"). If you want to follow Schema.org’s expectation (which is just a recommendation, not mandatory), you could use something like this: <article itemscope itemtype="https://schema.org/Article"> <div itemprop="publisher" itemscope ...


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Although it says on schema.org that Event.location can be either Place or PostalAddress, the google documentation says otherwise. Event.location is required and has to be a Place location: Place, required A nested schema.org/Place (or more specific subtype, such as schema.org/EventVenue or schema.org/PerformingArtsTheater). Event.location....



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