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For the Microdata, it does not matter if you use div, span or li. Using this is invalid, of course (span can’t have the attributes a and href): <span a href="http://www.example.com/" itemprop="url"></span> If you want to provide a URL without having a clickable/visible link, use the link element (which can be used in the body if used for ...


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If you want to have Rich Snippets in Google Search, you have to use the vocabulary Schema.org with a syntax that Google supports. Currently, Google supports JSON-LD, Microdata and RDFa. On Google’s "About schema.org" page, they still say that for JSON-LD only the Event Rich Snippet is supported, but this is most likely not true (anymore), as the ...


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Yes, itemref can do this, but it has to be used on the element to which the properties should be added to. So instead of this <div id="main-product" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Product"> </div> <div itemref="main-product" itemprop="isRelatedTo" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Product"> </div> you have to use this ...


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The duration property expects a Duration as value, which has to be in the ISO 8601 duration format. The time element can have a "valid duration string" as value (which is based on one of the ISO 8601 formats). Your value "PT4M5S" would be valid. So you should use <time itemprop="duration" datetime="PT4M5S">4:05</time> Microdata parsers have ...


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In HTML5+Microdata, only the meta element can have the content attribute. (In HTML5+RDFa, every element may have the content attribute.) So if you want to add the string value "in_stock", and it should not be visible on the page, using the meta element is the correct choice: <meta itemprop="availability" content="in_stock" /> You were probably ...


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Using structured data (e.g., via Microdata or RDFa) is not a direct ranking factor, but it can lead to more traffic (for example, because of Rich Snippets in the SERPs). However, if you already are using Microdata (probably with the Schema.org vocabulary), and you would now add RDFa, this would only benefit those consumers that only understand RDFa but not ...


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Why should I use them? The syntaxes Microdata and RDFa allow you to add structured data to your documents. Both use vocabularies for that purpose. You could create your own vocabulary, but it’s of course much more useful to use well-known vocabularies, because this allows more consumers to make use of your data. And that’s the main reason for adding ...


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About your HTML: You can (and should) use semantic markup, of course. So, for example, the product container should probably be an article instead of a div, and the "Product Name" should probably be an h1 instead of span. Like Martin Hepp writes also, you have to use link instead of meta if the value is a URI. About your Schema.org: The price property ...


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Yes, you may use any HTML5 element for Microdata. Bute note that some elements come with special rules: elements with href/src attribute (e.g., a, link, img, etc.) create a URI as value the time element creates a datetime as value All other elements create a string as value. This is usually the element’s content, but in some cases it’s the value of an ...


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This nesting has no effect. For Microdata, these two documents would be equivalent: <div itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/WebPage"> <div itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/WebPage"> </div> </div> <div itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/WebPage"> </div> <div itemscope ...


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If the value is a URL, you must use link instead of meta. <link itemprop="image" href="/uploads/images/medium/product_img.jpg" />


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Using meta (and link) elements for Microdata is fine. Sometimes there is even no sensible alternative to it, e.g., if specific codes have to be provided where it would make no sense to show them to your users. Google even uses meta in some of their Rich Snippets examples: Products and Software Apps: <meta itemprop="priceCurrency" content="USD" /> ...


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(Leaving aside consumer support.) The vocabulary Schema.org offers two ways to provide breadcrumbs for a WebPage (and its sub-types): breadcrumb property with a text value breadcrumb property with a BreadcrumbList value Using text is easy, but unstructured (harder to parse for consumers). Using BreadcrumbList is more complex, but allows to specify ...


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Schema.org neither requires nor recommends specific image dimensions. For an ImageObject, you may specify the image’s height and width with the height and width properties. Consumers of the data would have their own rules, if any at all. In case of Google Search tl;dr: For some Rich Snippets that use the image property, no dimensions are specified. For ...


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The Height should be at-least 120px And if the width is below 100px, then the ratio aspect must not be greater than 3.0. And images which are too small and no properly in square shape are not included in the +Snippet. Also images that do not pass these dimensions will not be included in the +snippet. This link would probably give you answers Check Here: ...


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What makes it worthwhile providing metadata? The fact that companies like Google and Microsoft provide this metadata also themselves? Or the fact that these companies make use of the metadata you provide? The Schema.org sponsor’s search engines provide no (Bing, Yahoo, Yandex) to little (Google) metadata using the Schema.org vocabulary, and this might ...



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