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7

Microdata extends HTML5 in a way that link and meta elements can be used in the body, if they contain an itemprop attribute. If the itemprop attribute is present on link or meta, they are flow content and phrasing content. The link and meta elements may be used where phrasing content is expected if the itemprop attribute is present. This extension is ...


7

W3Schools does not set the industry standards on HTML coding. They are simply a 3rd party reference site that is not affiliated with the W3C in anyway. W3Schools and other sites are often wrong when using cutting edge coding technologies such as Schema and Responsive design. When using fairly new code your one stop shop should be W3C as set the compliance ...


6

You could use the itemref attribute. From the Microdata specification (Working Draft): 4.2 The basic syntax: Properties that are not descendants of the element with the itemscope attribute can be associated with the item using the itemref attribute. This attribute takes a list of IDs of elements to crawl in addition to crawling the children of the ...


5

Tool from Yandex The "Structured data validator" supports JSON-LD. Alexander Shubin (working for Yandex) wrote: Pls, take into account that in order to check JSON-LD you need to put it in tag (since this is how it should be embedded into html). E.g., <script type="application/ld+json">{ "@context":"http://schema.org", "@type" : ...


3

Open Graph markup is completely different from Schema.org markup usually displayed in individual meta tags in the site's header, like so: <meta property="og:type" content="website" /> Schema.org markup is used inline with the content and is used to mark up, or describe the content itself. Open Graph and Schema.org are two different things and have ...


3

Sadly, schema.org doesn't have every type of place, person or object on the planet. At this current time you only have 2 options, which are: <div itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Place"> <div itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/City"> Either are valid because a village, town and city is a place. City is more specific, which is also a ...


3

If the code is validated, no. The following is: <div itemscope itemtype="http://data-vocabulary.org/Breadcrumb"> <a href="http://www.example.com/" itemprop="url"> <span itemprop="title">Dresses</span> </a> </div> Gets validated with any of those tags (<span>, <li>, <div>) and many ...


3

They're using microformats, specifically hCard and hCalendar. Along with RDFa and JSON-LD, this is an alternative to microdata. See Google's Rich Snippet spec for people here, and here's my public LinkedIn page viewed with Google's structured data testing tool, showing a preview Rich Snippet and the extracted structured data.


3

Google won't pick up on any markup that isn't visible to users. Because of this policy, they are unlikely to recognize any structured data that is in <script> tags. In general, Google won't display any content in rich snippets that is not visible to human user. Don't hide the content that you have marked up for rich snippets using techniques like ...


2

I actually posted that question, and another: Structured data: Is it okay to have more than one image, description and SKU per page? As Dan has answered my question, it appears to be okay to do so. There's not a lot of documentation about it, but if you run the following code on Google's Structured Data Testing Tool it displays all the data correctly, so ...


2

The define: <word> that Google shows at the top of the page is a type of Google one box. Google shows these special displays at the top of the search results for things like searches for: images video stocks currency maps Google does not use microdata to power one boxes. Rather it chooses the sites to feature manually and writes code to do so. ...


2

From Google's help document on rich snippet markup In general, Google will use only marked-up data that is visible to the user. Hidden data will be ignored. I see in your page source you have something like: <meta itemprop="name" content="LarraHeart" ></meta> <meta itemprop="additionalName" content="larraheart" ></meta> ...


2

Microdata vocabularies are usually language-independent. Take for example the vocabulary schema.org: a Movie can have the property alternativeHeadline. The expected type is Text, and it’s defined as: "A secondary title of the CreativeWork.". It doesn’t matter at all if this secondary title is in English, German, or Sindarin. Are itemprop values self ...


2

The error occurs because the product name is not visible, it is placed incorrectly in a table structure. A simple change to: <table itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Product"> <tr> <td class="label"> <meta itemprop="name" content="An idea suitable for potential candidate for the fourth plinth" />Suitable for </td> ...


2

Testing a page on the testing tool i saw this: Note: The testing tool currently only checks the first rel=author link listed on a webpage for a link to a Google+ profile [...]. It's possible that authorship may in fact be working for this page because of other rel=author links on the page. To verify that authorship is working on this page, please ensure ...


2

As bybe mentioned, it can take a few weeks before your structured data begins to appear, and there have been some bugs in the reporting system lately. However, I should mention that if you use Google's Data Highlighter Tool to mark up your page, Google's testing tool will not pick it up. That's because the Highlighter Tool does not actually add HTML markup ...


2

Sadly with anything Google there is nothing that is given in approx. time frames. This is because Google allocates resources to your site based on its authority and how busy their bot is. But in experience structured data normally appears between 1-6 weeks after the first index - it can take a few crawls before Google decides to display it within Google ...


2

Microdata (Note) can only be used on HTML elements as defined by HTML5. According to HTML5 (CR), the svg element is not in the HTML namespace. WHATWG’s HTML spec explicitly mentions that Microdata doesn’t work for svg (quoted on 2014-01-02): Currently, the itemscope, itemprop, and other microdata attributes are only defined for HTML elements. This means ...


2

Well, you are attempting to claim that an Article is also a Person, which doesn't make sense semantically. If you are trying to claim that Person is an author of Article, there is an 'author' property of Article to do this. The additonaltype property is only useful when you are dealing with 'nested' types -- in other words, the properties you specify are ...


2

Being strict while keeping things simple, and without mixing vocabularies, you can use the image property, which is generic but specific enough about the content you are marking up. A logo is not normally associated with a person, it's associated with a product, a company, or things like that. So for practical purposes, the image she uses is going to define ...


2

Yes, you could/should add the markup on any page where relevant content can be marked up. However, you should not add several items for the same thing on the same page, unless something like Microdata’s itemid can be used to specify that the items are actually about the same thing. You might use the itemref attribute if you have relevant data about the same ...


2

Every classified ad could be an Offer. The seller property can refer to the Organization/Person offering something. The itemOffered property can refer to the actual Product (e.g., a car) that gets offered. etc.


2

I am not sure what all you need so it will be hard to speak to your particular needs. But this is what I think is going on and the solution is really really simple. Each entity/data pair belongs to a type within the schema. You cannot mix them. But you can use any or all of them any time any way you want. Here is what I mean. For Articles, they live within ...


2

You can use a <meta> element with itemprops for content which doesn't appear in a format you could otherwise mark up. This is described by Schema.org as "missing and implicit information". I'm not aware of any reason why you can't apply this principle to any data you wish to describe with microdata, though if your HTML is well structured applying it ...


2

There are different standards for microdata. The word microdata just means that data has been embedded in the page. When you start using microdata you must reference which standard you are using with the itemtype attribute. For example; <div itemtype="http://schema.org/WebPage"> This itemtype property defines the microdata format for all the ...


2

Yes, you can use every HTML5 element for Microdata … Microdata defines 5 new attributes for HTML5: itemid itemprop itemref itemscope itemtype Let’s see where they can be used. Section 5.2 says: Every HTML element may have an itemscope attribute specified. So every element can have itemscope. Further on it says: Elements with an itemscope ...


2

As far as I am aware, they do not directly influence your SERP position. However, they do increase CTR (click-through-rate) on search results. A lot of webmasters work hard at getting themselves into the top five results for a specific keyword without ever giving much thought to CTR. This is a bit wasteful, in my opinion, considering our sole reason for ...


2

I'm not sure when this issue started for you, but my Merchant Center Account was throwing the same error for Limited Availability items also. It turns out that Google's updated their feed specification (see here) and are removing LimitedAvailability as an allowed value. I updated those items to be In Stock, and the warnings disappeared. Another valid ...


2

[Updated: I suggest nesting types/elements when mark-up appears to require it. The reason is simple. You never know how the data will be used and where nesting is appropriate, nesting will give a clearer picture of the data you are marking-up. Nesting does not always seem possible when you try and stitch mark-up into your HTML. It can be a real struggle ...


2

The Schema markup for a product should be like:- <div itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Product"> <a itemprop="url" href="http://www.example.com/product"> <div itemprop="name"><strong>Product Name</strong></div> </a> <div itemprop="description">This is my product ...



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