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9

schema.org/BlogPosting image permits ImageObject and URL, however Google only permits ImageObject, hence the error. The intended markup is: <!-- my code --> <div itemprop="image" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/ImageObject"> <img src="image.jpg" itemprop="url"> </div>                 Another discrepancy is schema.org/...


5

The mainEntityOfPage property is used to give the URL of a page on which the thing is the main entity. It might become clearer if you look at the inverse property mainEntity: this gives the main entity for a page (see an example). For example, for a web page that contains a single blog post, you could provide one of these: BlogPosting → mainEntityOfPage →...


4

you should be clear, why do you want to make use of structured data? to go through the testing tool or to deliver correctly formatted and standard conform structured data to search engine, so your site will be included into Google News output? Google News Article needs image: that's the fact. Why it needs it? To show it to the people. What are solutions? ...


2

Although it says on schema.org that Event.location can be either Place or PostalAddress, the google documentation says otherwise. Event.location is required and has to be a Place location: Place, required A nested schema.org/Place (or more specific subtype, such as schema.org/EventVenue or schema.org/PerformingArtsTheater). Event.location....


2

This code will do the job, and is errorfree validated: <div itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Product" itemref="v1437"> <span itemprop="name">MyProduct</span> </div> <div itemprop="brand" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Brand" id="v1437" itemref="p1437"> <h1 itemprop="name">MyBrand</h1> <link ...


2

Types and properties for hotels are proposed and will likely be part of the next Schema.org release (2.3). In this proposal, Hotel¹ can have the property starRating¹: An official rating for the lodging business, e.g. from national associations or standards bodies. Use the name property of a PropertyValue for indicating the type of the rating (e.g. ...


2

Follow as in visit? Probably not. In additionalType you specify a URI that represents a type. If a search engine supports this type, it has no need to visit it (because it already knows what it needs to know when seeing the URI). If a search engine doesn’t support this type, it could visit its URI, learn something about it (via RDF), and make use of it,...


2

Use this tags. <a href="http://www.example.com/hd-image.jpg"><img src="http://www.example.com/thumbnail-img"/></a> Most of all ecommerce websites, blogger websites, and wikipedia uses links in images for Image SEO. Here, you display compressed image in img src, so it load images quickly, but when Google spider see that link, then they ...


2

Yes, providing the property multiple times is the correct way to do this in Microdata. If you want to provide data about the telephone number, you could use the contactPoint property with a ContactPoint value for each telephone number. Its contactType property could specify the kind of contact point (e.g., "Office" or "Mobile"). <div itemscope itemtype="...


2

The Schema.org properties articleBody and description expect Text as value. If you want to follow this advice, you have to specify the properties (in itemprop) on an element that creates a string value (these are most elements, e.g., div). So let’s say you use <div itemprop="articleBody"></div>. It’s the textContent of that element that will be ...


2

I described the different ways how mainEntityOfPage can be specified in an answer on Stack Overflow. The difference between your two examples is that the second one creates an item (with the type WebPage), while the first one just points to another page (which might or might not define a type). From the perspective of Schema.org, both ways are fine. The ...


1

For the WebSite itemscope, a perfectly viable alternative would be to use JSON-LD format as opposed to Microdata, namely because the scope of a Website would include the <head> element as well. To put that into context, the name item property of the WebPage element is best represented with the <title> element, which lives in the head of the ...


1

If you want, you can use WebPage (or one of its subtypes, like AboutPage) for every page on your site, including the homepage. In addition, you can provide items (using suitable types) for every "entity" you have content about on the page. For example, if every page contains your organization’s name and telephone number, you can (and should) have an ...


1

The website http://schema.org/ is the relevant and the only canonical source for Schema.org types and properties. Type vs. property. A type represents a thing, a property is for providing information about that thing. The name of a type always starts with an uppercase letter (e.g., Person), the name of a property always starts with a lowercase letter (e.g., ...


1

your code contains error, thats why two authors aren't recognized. If you have more then one author, you should add them as list without entity duplication. Here the correct code: <script type="application/ld+json"> { "@context": "http://schema.org", "@type": "WebPage", "mainEntity": { "@type": "Book", "author": [{ ...


1

Yes, provide multiple author properties. But note that the itemprop has to be specified on the element with the itemscope. <div itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Book"> <span itemprop="author" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Person"></span> <span itemprop="author" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Person"></span&...


1

I think the first variant (ExerciseAction → event → SportsEvent) makes more sense, but only because the definition of potentialAction seems to suggest that it’s for, well, potential actions, i.e., actions that could possibly happen at this event (e.g., things you can do), and not for actions that actually happened. For explicitly denoting that this action ...


1

Traditional hotel star ratings are not based on reviews and would not be appropriate to use the aggregateRating. Instead the stars are an award and if you wish to represent them in schema.org you should do it like this: Rated <span itemprop="award">★★★★☆</span> by the Hotelstars Union.


1

itemref does not work like that. You have to add the itemref attribute to the element you want to apply a property to, and this property has to be defined on an element with the matching ID. So your example should be: <div itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Product" itemref="v1437"> </div> <h1 itemprop="brand" itemscope itemtype="http://...


1

It's actually pretty straightforward - the breadcrumbs error is because you marked up the last (current) element as breadcrumb. However the requirement is to be link also, as the previous breadcrumbs. You have two options: 1). Add the url property to the last element too. It will be link to the article itself, will pass the validator (recommended): instead ...


1

FWIW I think this issue was resolved on Google's side quite some time ago.


1

The rich snippets that you are talking about are pulled from the Google knowledge graph which allows certain rich content to be appended to the top search results where the Google algorithms deem it most appropriate. Google uses machine learning techniques to distinguish data from the structured layout of your page. As a webmaster you can use microdata to ...


1

You could use both types, BlogPosting and Review. That’s perfectly fine in RDFa and JSON-LD. In Microdata, it’s allowed to use multiple types, too, but it’s (strictly speaking) not allowed to use properties that aren’t defined for all these types; many ignore this restriction, though (and I think Schema.org intends to explicitly allow this for their ...


1

Anwser edited: On second thought. You don't have to choose. You can use BlogPosting and in the about field you use Review directly or choose Product and use its review field. <article itemprop="blogPost" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/BlogPosting"> <h1 itemprop="name headline">some clothing review</h1> <p> <time ...


1

Your table markup is not valid (a div can’t contain a tr, a tr can’t contain a meta). If you fix it, Google’s testing tool seems to recognize it fine. A quick way for testing this (but you shouldn’t publish like that): replace the tr and td elements with div.


1

Parents should always have siblings, but you can use as few as you like, or as many as you like. Since your using SiteNavigationElement, you can use any of the childs from: Properties from CreativeWork Properties from Thing Using with or without itemprop="name" are both valid. Valid: <nav itemscope="itemscope" itemtype="http://schema.org/...


1

Google has stated, that structured data is not currently used for featured snippets. https://www.seroundtable.com/google-structured-data-not-featured-snippets-21206.html Other than that, it is not known (not publicly announced) that structured data elements compete for being displayed in SERPs in any ways.


1

If a search engine supports a specific Schema.org type (like Organization) and also supports a specific property that takes another item as value (like parentOrganization), it would of course parse this nested item, otherwise you couldn’t really speak of "support". So the question really should be: Which Schema.org types/properties does make the search ...


1

If Google wouldn't be able to understand your Thai content, so it wouldn't be able too, to rank it and to show it like a search result. So, for first, be sure, it understands your site. For the second, you should explain the meaning of your site in the site's language. So, if your use Schema.org's inline markup, something like <span itemprop="description"...


1

You can use Microdata (as you do in your example) as well. Just add the necessary properties and missing data (with a meta tag) for example like this: <div itemscope itemtype='http://schema.org/LocalBusiness'> <p><strong>Contact Us:</strong></p> <p itemprop='contactPoint' itemscope itemtype='http://schema.org/...



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