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7

schema.org/BlogPosting image permits ImageObject and URL, however Google only permits ImageObject, hence the error. The intended markup is: <!-- my code --> <div itemprop="image" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/ImageObject"> <img src="image.jpg" itemprop="url"> </div>                 Another discrepancy is ...


3

you should be clear, why do you want to make use of structured data? to go through the testing tool or to deliver correctly formatted and standard conform structured data to search engine, so your site will be included into Google News output? Google News Article needs image: that's the fact. Why it needs it? To show it to the people. What are solutions? ...


3

Schema.org neither requires nor recommends specific image dimensions. For an ImageObject, you may specify the image’s height and width with the height and width properties. Consumers of the data would have their own rules, if any at all. In case of Google Search tl;dr: For some Rich Snippets that use the image property, no dimensions are specified. For ...


3

What makes it worthwhile providing metadata? The fact that companies like Google and Microsoft provide this metadata also themselves? Or the fact that these companies make use of the metadata you provide? The Schema.org sponsor’s search engines provide no (Bing, Yahoo, Yandex) to little (Google) metadata using the Schema.org vocabulary, and this might ...


3

What is the correct usage of using the brand schema from schema.org? There is not one "correct usage" – it depends on what you want to convey. If you want to say something about a brand, you can use Schema.org’s Brand type. The Product type has the property brand, which takes a Brand item as value. This would allow you to reference the Brand from each ...


3

The mainEntityOfPage property is used to give the URL of a page on which the thing is the main entity. It might become clearer if you look at the inverse property mainEntity: this gives the main entity for a page (see an example). For example, for a web page that contains a single blog post, you could provide one of these: BlogPosting → mainEntityOfPage ...


2

No, your example would mean that it’s an schema:Article and a pto:Dog_breed. To state what the schema:Article is about, you could use its about property. The elaborate version would be: <article itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Article"> <div itemprop="about" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Intangible"> <link ...


2

I’m assuming you are using the vocabulary Schema.org and have something like this: <script type="application/ld+json"> { "@context": "http://schema.org", "@type": "LocalBusiness", "url": "http://example.com/" } </script> Here the url property belongs to the LocalBusiness item. So it should give the URI of the local business, no matter on ...


2

Your use of additionalType in the first snippet is correct. An example where additionalType is used can be seen on Schema.org’s IndividualProduct: <script type="application/ld+json"> { "@context": "http://schema.org", "@id": "#product", "@type": "IndividualProduct", "additionalType": "http://www.productontology.org/id/Racing_bicycle", ...


2

There is no need for the >symbol regarding to the Google Structured Data page about Breadcrumbs. Just use a markup as shown in the example: <ol itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/BreadcrumbList"> <li itemprop="itemListElement" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/ListItem"> <a itemprop="item" ...


2

In HTML5+Microdata, only the meta element can have the content attribute. (In HTML5+RDFa, every element may have the content attribute.) So if you want to add the string value "in_stock", and it should not be visible on the page, using the meta element is the correct choice: <meta itemprop="availability" content="in_stock" /> You were probably ...


2

This code will do the job, and is errorfree validated: <div itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Product" itemref="v1437"> <span itemprop="name">MyProduct</span> </div> <div itemprop="brand" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Brand" id="v1437" itemref="p1437"> <h1 itemprop="name">MyBrand</h1> <link ...


2

Types and properties for hotels are proposed and will likely be part of the next Schema.org release (2.3). In this proposal, Hotel¹ can have the property starRating¹: An official rating for the lodging business, e.g. from national associations or standards bodies. Use the name property of a PropertyValue for indicating the type of the rating (e.g. ...


2

Follow as in visit? Probably not. In additionalType you specify a URI that represents a type. If a search engine supports this type, it has no need to visit it (because it already knows what it needs to know when seeing the URI). If a search engine doesn’t support this type, it could visit its URI, learn something about it (via RDF), and make use of ...


2

Use this tags. <a href="http://www.example.com/hd-image.jpg"><img src="http://www.example.com/thumbnail-img"/></a> Most of all ecommerce websites, blogger websites, and wikipedia uses links in images for Image SEO. Here, you display compressed image in img src, so it load images quickly, but when Google spider see that link, then they ...


2

The Schema.org properties articleBody and description expect Text as value. If you want to follow this advice, you have to specify the properties (in itemprop) on an element that creates a string value (these are most elements, e.g., div). So let’s say you use <div itemprop="articleBody"></div>. It’s the textContent of that element that will ...


2

Yes, providing the property multiple times is the correct way to do this in Microdata. If you want to provide data about the telephone number, you could use the contactPoint property with a ContactPoint value for each telephone number. Its contactType property could specify the kind of contact point (e.g., "Office" or "Mobile"). <div itemscope ...


1

itemref does not work like that. You have to add the itemref attribute to the element you want to apply a property to, and this property has to be defined on an element with the matching ID. So your example should be: <div itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Product" itemref="v1437"> </div> <h1 itemprop="brand" itemscope ...


1

Anwser edited: On second thought. You don't have to choose. You can use BlogPosting and in the about field you use Review directly or choose Product and use it's review field. <article itemprop="blogPost" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/BlogPosting"> <h1 itemprop="name headline">some clothing review</h1> <p> ...


1

Your table markup is not valid (a div can’t contain a tr, a tr can’t contain a meta). If you fix it, Google’s testing tool seems to recognize it fine. A quick way for testing this (but you shouldn’t publish like that): replace the tr and td elements with div.


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Google has stated, that structured data is not currently used for featured snippets. https://www.seroundtable.com/google-structured-data-not-featured-snippets-21206.html Other than that, it is not known (not publicly announced) that structured data elements compete for being displayed in SERPs in any ways.


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If a search engine supports a specific Schema.org type (like Organization) and also supports a specific property that takes another item as value (like parentOrganization), it would of course parse this nested item, otherwise you couldn’t really speak of "support". So the question really should be: Which Schema.org types/properties does make the search ...


1

If Google wouldn't be able to understand your Thai content, so it wouldn't be able too, to rank it and to show it like a search result. So, for first, be sure, it understands your site. For the second, you should explain the meaning of your site in the site's language. So, if your use Schema.org's inline markup, something like <span ...


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You can use Microdata (as you do in your example) as well. Just add the necessary properties and missing data (with a meta tag) for example like this: <div itemscope itemtype='http://schema.org/LocalBusiness'> <p><strong>Contact Us:</strong></p> <p itemprop='contactPoint' itemscope ...


1

the testing tool is clear with error descriptions: you haven't applied required properties. If you add location as Type PostalAddress, so you MUST add address and (stadion)name. Location by its own should have its own name too, not only as postalAddress. And avoid usage of relative urls like urls - they could be not correctly recognized. Update: following ...


1

As you said there is an open issue on schema.org for this, so you may be better attempting your own solutions and using trial-and-error to see if google picks it up correct. I would use solution 2. because it gives closed hours and seems clearest, this sounded similar to the suggested solution from the schema.org thread ...


1

It's actually pretty straightforward - the breadcrumbs error is because you marked up the last (current) element as breadcrumb. However the requirement is to be link also, as the previous breadcrumbs. You have two options: 1). Add the url property to the last element too. It will be link to the article itself, will pass the validator (recommended): instead ...


1

About your HTML: You can (and should) use semantic markup, of course. So, for example, the product container should probably be an article instead of a div, and the "Product Name" should probably be an h1 instead of span. Like Martin Hepp writes also, you have to use link instead of meta if the value is a URI. About your Schema.org: The price property ...


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(Leaving aside consumer support.) The vocabulary Schema.org offers two ways to provide breadcrumbs for a WebPage (and its sub-types): breadcrumb property with a text value breadcrumb property with a BreadcrumbList value Using text is easy, but unstructured (harder to parse for consumers). Using BreadcrumbList is more complex, but allows to specify ...


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It does not matter how you nest elements in Microdata, unless you use a property (itemprop). These two snippets produce the same Microdata: <div itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/WPSideBar"> </div> <div itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/WPAdBlock"> </div> <div itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/WPSideBar"> ...



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