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7

These are no resources which get usually accessed by the browser but simply a fancy way to declare a name space, i.e. all SVG images share the same XML name space which is defined by the URL and same with xlink. This means you should treat any of these xmlns just as some kind of special string and leave them unchanged.


4

JSON-LD doesn’t care. Which makes sense, because the data is the same, no matter from where in the document it gets extracted. From the perspective of HTML, you should only include it in the head if the JSON-LD is about your web page or about what your web page represents, because the head element is defined to contain metadata for the document. But it’s ...


4

I guess there is no reason to assume that Google wouldn’t handle SVGs as value of the image property: Schema.org’s image property expects an image URL (or an ImageObject). SVG is an image format (image/svg+xml). Google does index SVG images. (Of course, we can never be sure; and things might change always.) Generally, the syntax shouldn’t matter, as ...


4

Note that syntaxes like Microdata and RDFa don’t annotate the HTML, they use the HTML just as a carrier. After parsing the Microdata/RDFa, it doesn’t matter anymore which markup was used. If your two properties with the same content belong to the same item, it’s not useful to have the additional one, as it doesn’t add anything new (but it’s not forbidden ...


3

What makes it worthwhile providing metadata? The fact that companies like Google and Microsoft provide this metadata also themselves? Or the fact that these companies make use of the metadata you provide? The Schema.org sponsor’s search engines provide no (Bing, Yahoo, Yandex) to little (Google) metadata using the Schema.org vocabulary, and this might ...


3

What is the correct usage of using the brand schema from schema.org? There is not one "correct usage" – it depends on what you want to convey. If you want to say something about a brand, you can use Schema.org’s Brand type. The Product type has the property brand, which takes a Brand item as value. This would allow you to reference the Brand from each ...


3

you should be clear, why do you want to make use of structured data? to go through the testing tool or to deliver correctly formatted and standard conform structured data to search engine, so your site will be included into Google News output? Google News Article needs image: that's the fact. Why it needs it? To show it to the people. What are solutions? ...


2

Historically, Google said they ignored structured data which was not used to markup visible content. Because your snippet shows both date published and date updated as visible on-page content but the Moz example shows date published as non-visible meta data, I'd try tweaking that and seeing if it works to get Google to show the last update date instead.


2

The mainContentOfPage property expects a WebPageElement as value, but you are using Blog (which is not a child of WebPageElement). You seem to use it like a property to denote the "main entity" of a page, but this is not appropriate. A property for that is currently under discussion. Side note: It is not appropriate to use the url property for each ...


2

No, your example would mean that it’s an schema:Article and a pto:Dog_breed. To state what the schema:Article is about, you could use its about property. The elaborate version would be: <article itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Article"> <div itemprop="about" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Intangible"> <link ...


2

I’m assuming you are using the vocabulary Schema.org and have something like this: <script type="application/ld+json"> { "@context": "http://schema.org", "@type": "LocalBusiness", "url": "http://example.com/" } </script> Here the url property belongs to the LocalBusiness item. So it should give the URI of the local business, no matter on ...


2

Your use of additionalType in the first snippet is correct. An example where additionalType is used can be seen on Schema.org’s IndividualProduct: <script type="application/ld+json"> { "@context": "http://schema.org", "@id": "#product", "@type": "IndividualProduct", "additionalType": "http://www.productontology.org/id/Racing_bicycle", ...


2

Schema.org neither requires nor recommends specific image dimensions. For an ImageObject, you may specify the image’s height and width with the height and width properties. Consumers of the data would have their own rules, if any at all. In case of Google Search tl;dr: For some Rich Snippets that use the image property, no dimensions are specified. For ...


2

You are missing some closing </div> tags. If I correctly interpret your intentions, it should look like this: <div itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/SocialEvent"> <a itemprop="url" href="www.convention-name.org"><div itemprop="name"><strong>Bob's Convention</strong></div></a> <div ...


2

There is no need for the >symbol regarding to the Google Structured Data page about Breadcrumbs. Just use a markup as shown in the example: <ol itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/BreadcrumbList"> <li itemprop="itemListElement" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/ListItem"> <a itemprop="item" ...


2

This code will do the job, and is errorfree validated: <div itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Product" itemref="v1437"> <span itemprop="name">MyProduct</span> </div> <div itemprop="brand" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Brand" id="v1437" itemref="p1437"> <h1 itemprop="name">MyBrand</h1> <link ...


2

Types and properties for hotels are proposed and will likely be part of the next Schema.org release (2.3). In this proposal, Hotel¹ can have the property starRating¹: An official rating for the lodging business, e.g. from national associations or standards bodies. Use the name property of a PropertyValue for indicating the type of the rating (e.g. ...


2

Follow as in visit? Probably not. In additionalType you specify a URI that represents a type. If a search engine supports this type, it has no need to visit it (because it already knows what it needs to know when seeing the URI). If a search engine doesn’t support this type, it could visit its URI, learn something about it (via RDF), and make use of ...


2

Use this tags. <a href="http://www.example.com/hd-image.jpg"><img src="http://www.example.com/thumbnail-img"/></a> Most of all ecommerce websites, blogger websites, and wikipedia uses links in images for Image SEO. Here, you display compressed image in img src, so it load images quickly, but when Google spider see that link, then they ...


1

It’s similar to using the meta element for Microdata (in fact, the only difference between meta and link is that link must be used if the value is a URI, meta in every other case): Use link if you can’t provide a visible hyperlink/image/video/etc. A typical (but not the only) reason for using link is in cases where the URL is not supposed to be visited by ...


1

An entity (like a book) can have multiple types. Stating that something is a Book and a Product (or in your case maybe IndividualProduct) is possible and can make sense. However, Microdata has only limited support for multi-typed entities: the spec requires that all types come from the same vocabulary, and that each property is defined for all of the used ...


1

FWIW I think this issue was resolved on Google's side quite some time ago.


1

If your web page is a search results page, simply use SearchResultsPage instead of WebPage. It’s a hierarchy. Each child inherits from all its ancestors. So a SearchResultsPage is a more specific WebPage, which is a more specific CreativeWork, which is a more specific Thing. Always go with the most specific type that applies to your case. On a type’s ...


1

From what I found, Google Structured Data Validation tool doesn't allow you to use PostalAddress for 'location' despite it being allowed by the schema. In here https://schema.org/location it's specifically said that 'location' can be either Place or PostalAddress. Given that the Place have attributes 'address' and 'name' and GSDVT is asking for them ...


1

Having something like CreativeWork → about → Product seems to be appropriate: it’s a creative work whose "subject matter" is a product. However, you can be more specific: ItemPage inherits from CreativeWork: A page devoted to a single item, such as a particular product or hotel. So you might want to use ItemPage → about → Product Probably a better ...


1

As far as I understand it, an ApartmentComplex does not represent a single apartment/condo, but the whole building consisting of several apartments/condos. (In the same sense, GatedResidenceCommunity is for the whole community, not a single residence inside of that community.) So if you want to represent a single apartment/condo, you should use Residence. ...


1

The benefit of using specific is supposed to be the additional field attributed to them. For a Condo, it might be 'safer' to use Residence or Place vs ApartmentComplex unless you specifically need an attribute that appears in ApartmentComplex and not in it's parents i.e. Place. Place should cover most locations and since these two specific items in your ...


1

Yes, you may use different vocabularies (like Schema.org and Data-Vocabulary.org) in the same document. Microdata (in contrast to RDFa) has rather limited support for mixed vocabulary use for the same content, so if you decide to use Schema.org’s BreadcrumbList together with Data-Vocabulary.org’s Breadcrumb in the future, you would have to duplicate your ...


1

Using meta (and link) elements for Microdata is fine. Sometimes there is even no sensible alternative to it, e.g., if specific codes have to be provided where it would make no sense to show them to your users. Google even uses meta in some of their Rich Snippets examples: Products and Software Apps: <meta itemprop="priceCurrency" content="USD" /> ...


1

Google says that they can read dynamically added structured data if the JSON-LD syntax is used: Also, Google can read JSON-LD data even when it is dynamically injected into the page's contents, such as by Javascript code or embedded "widgets". They don’t document this for the other syntaxes they support (Microdata, RDFa), but this doesn’t necessarily ...



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