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You can provide Schema.org properties multiple times. So each Service can have multiple areaServed values: <div itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Service"> <ul> <li itemprop="areaServed">…</li> <li itemprop="areaServed">…</li> <li itemprop="areaServed">…</li> </ul> </div>


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If you place the itemscope on the <head> tag, the Microdata item "ends" with the </head> tag. If you want to add properties from the head as well as from the body, you have three options: specify the itemscope on the html element specify the itemscope only on one of these and use the itemref attribute to reference properties from the other ...


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For the WebSite itemscope, a perfectly viable alternative would be to use JSON-LD format as opposed to Microdata, namely because the scope of a Website would include the <head> element as well. To put that into context, the name item property of the WebPage element is best represented with the <title> element, which lives in the head of the ...


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If you want, you can use WebPage (or one of its subtypes, like AboutPage) for every page on your site, including the homepage. In addition, you can provide items (using suitable types) for every "entity" you have content about on the page. For example, if every page contains your organization’s name and telephone number, you can (and should) have an ...


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The website http://schema.org/ is the relevant and the only canonical source for Schema.org types and properties. Type vs. property. A type represents a thing, a property is for providing information about that thing. The name of a type always starts with an uppercase letter (e.g., Person), the name of a property always starts with a lowercase letter (e.g., ...



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