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12

The three big search engines, Google, Bing and Yahoo (and more recently, Yandex), have agreed to understand 1 single microdata vocabulary. This is Schema.org, which has examples of placement. This formats your results as Rich Snippets, the search engine results which have pictures and fivestar ratings, etc, displayed on the search result page. While this ...


11

The real answer is to use whatever suits your site best. Some facts: Keywords in the URL aid SEO and give users an idea of what the page is about. This is true for both static and dynamic URLs. The consensus is that a lowercase slug, separated by dashes, is the best. Search engines index dynamic URIs (e.g. index.php?page=about) just fine. Using ID numbers ...


9

Microdata extends HTML5 in a way that link and meta elements can be used in the body, if they contain an itemprop attribute. If the itemprop attribute is present on link or meta, they are flow content and phrasing content. The link and meta elements may be used where phrasing content is expected if the itemprop attribute is present. This extension is ...


8

W3Schools does not set the industry standards on HTML coding. They are simply a 3rd party reference site that is not affiliated with the W3C in anyway. W3Schools and other sites are often wrong when using cutting edge coding technologies such as Schema and Responsive design. When using fairly new code your one stop shop should be W3C as set the compliance ...


7

Both are solutions for semantically annotating your content, but in very different ways: Microdata extends HTML5 (e.g., by introducing new attributes like itemprop), while Microformats only uses existing HTML mechanisms (like class and rel attributes). With Microdata, you can use almost any vocabulary (a popular one is Schema.org), with Microformats you ...


6

schema.org: Article, BlogPosting If something is a schema:BlogPosting, it is an schema:Article, too, isn't it? As schema:BlogPosting is a more specific schema:Article: More specific types BlogPosting NewsArticle ScholarlyArticle So you have an schema:Article, and now you may decide if one of these more specific types applies to your ...


6

You could use the itemref attribute. From the Microdata specification (Working Draft): 4.2 The basic syntax: Properties that are not descendants of the element with the itemscope attribute can be associated with the item using the itemref attribute. This attribute takes a list of IDs of elements to crawl in addition to crawling the children of the ...


5

You can also check your microdata format against Google Webmaster Tools, rich snippet testing tool at http://www.google.com/webmasters/tools/richsnippets


5

There is no definitive timeframe. In fact, there's no guarantee Google will use breadcrumbs in their search results for your pages. As with anything related to Google displaying search results, you can give them clues and express your wishes as for what to display in the search results but ultimately Google will decide if and when it will happen. All you can ...


5

I believe you are looking for schema.rdfs.org - pertinent links: RDF/XML JSON CSV


5

It certainly does look like Google is treating these sites specially. When you see results from discussion forums in Google search results it contains various helpful bits of information, like dates and numbers of replies. So it looks like Google has written custom parsers for various popular forum engines. This blog post from 2009 announces it as a feature ...


5

Neither: http://example.com/good-uri-design or at least: http://example.com/articles/good-uri-design Good slugs are not necessarily the same as the title, they should be concise and use URL friendly characters.


5

Google recommends using microdata, but it does support three formats: microdata, microformats, and RDFa. A big reason to choose microdata would be that the examples that Google gives on it's website and those on schema.org are in the microdata format. Here is a site that has a huge table of the various advantages and disadvantages of the three formats. ...


5

Tool from Yandex The "Structured data validator" supports JSON-LD. Alexander Shubin (working for Yandex) wrote: Pls, take into account that in order to check JSON-LD you need to put it in tag (since this is how it should be embedded into html). E.g., <script type="application/ld+json">{ "@context":"http://schema.org", "@type" : ...


4

This advice, from Jakob Neilsen, was written back in 1999 but still seems pertinent today: The URL will continue to be part of the Web user interface for several more years, so a usable site requires: a domain name that is easy to remember and easy to spell short URLs easy-to-type URLs URLs that visualize the site structure URLs that ...


4

These resources might help: 11 Best Practices for URLs How to make URLs user-friendly


4

From schema.org: This site provides a collection of schemas, i.e., html tags, that webmasters can use to markup their pages in ways recognized by major search providers. Search engines including Bing, Google and Yahoo! rely on this markup to improve the display of search results, making it easier for people to find the right web pages. Many ...


4

Is Google treating these sites specially? As paulmorriss mentioned, Google does apply an algorithmic means for identifying forums and, interestingly enough, Yahoo Answers and Ask.MetaFilter show similar snippets (search "Does my dog have fleas?" or "What does my cat think I am?" ... ?!) so it's quite possible that Google is treating sites with a few key ...


4

I used the instructions on the article How To Implement Rel=Author for creating my page. The only difference is that I had two rel=author links instead of one. I then tested the page with Google's rich snippets testing tool, and the first author that was linked was displayed as if it were the only author. The second author was not displayed at all. Multiple ...


4

If there is a microformat for the data you have on your website and you wish to optimize your website for the search engines then you should use use microformats in your websites. How much of a difference it will make in your SEO efforts will vary just like every other thing that has to do with SEO. It will depend on lots of other factors. But if you want to ...


4

Your rich snippet data needs to be visible to users. From Google's rich snippet troubleshooting: Is your marked-up content hidden from users? In general, Google won't display any content in rich snippets that is not visible to human user. It can be tempting to add all the content relevant for a rich snippet in one place on the page, mark it up, and ...


4

You should use <meta itemprop="image" content="/uploads/images/medium/product_img.jpg"> Since src="" is associated with embedding content on the page and content="" is associated with embedding items off the page so to speak. This is the same method as used with the Facebook Open Graph meta as well, take a look: <meta property='og:image' ...


4

Typically, user agents wouldn’t dereference these URIs. There should be absolutely no problem in using the Schema.org HTTP URIs on a HTTPS site. In fact, many other vocabularies (used for Microdata or RDFa) provide only HTTP URIs, so you have no choice there. I’d even say it’s bad practice to provide multiple vocabulary URIs for the same concept, as ...


3

I couldn't find any author-specific information, but the HTML specs do allow you to define more than one link with the same relationship, e.g. <link rel="alternate" hreflang="de" href="//de.example.com/my/page.htm"> <link rel="alternate" hreflang="en-gb" href="//uk.example.com/my/page.htm"> <link rel="alternate" type="application/rss+xml" ...


3

No, you don't need to duplicate the HTML exactly: microdata schemas are based on the microdata attributes. It doesn't matter (usually; e.g. links are an exception) what HTML tag those attributes are applied to. You may want to start by reading "Getting started with schema.org", if you haven't already.


3

It means the page that link points to will contain a list of links to other pages that are tagged by the anchor text of that link. For example, if a link looked like this: <a href="/tags/seo" rel="tag">SEO</a> The microformat tells the search engine, and any other user-agent, that the URL /tags/seo contains links to documents (i.e. pages, etc) ...


3

Unfortunately none of those formats are suitable for what you do. What you're offering is a service and although each of the rich snippets formats support Products, services are really quite different things. There's some discussion of the need for something on services on the Microformats wiki There is a need for a specific microformat dedicated to ...


3

Honestly, I have a feeling it is about as elusive as getting Google Sitelinks. My recommendation is to follow the Google guide for Rich Snippits and when the site gets enough PageRank and keywords hits, it will naturally start appearing. Also be sure to watch your webmaster tools closely and address any issues Google finds. There is also a section called ...


3

According to the HTML5 Working Draft: The author keyword may be used with link, a, and area elements. This keyword creates a hyperlink. For a and area elements, the author keyword indicates that the referenced document provides further information about the author of the nearest article element ancestor of the element defining the hyperlink, ...


3

As of right now, schema.org microformats are primarily used to display purposes in search results. So far there has not been any indication that they affect search results in any significant way. Plus with that particular format being easy to abuse i would suspect it would have no effect on rankings. I would speculate it will serve other purposes somehow ...



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