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12

The three big search engines, Google, Bing and Yahoo (and more recently, Yandex), have agreed to understand 1 single microdata vocabulary. This is Schema.org, which has examples of placement. This formats your results as Rich Snippets, the search engine results which have pictures and fivestar ratings, etc, displayed on the search result page. While this ...


7

W3Schools does not set the industry standards on HTML coding. They are simply a 3rd party reference site that is not affiliated with the W3C in anyway. W3Schools and other sites are often wrong when using cutting edge coding technologies such as Schema and Responsive design. When using fairly new code your one stop shop should be W3C as set the compliance ...


7

Microdata extends HTML5 in a way that link and meta elements can be used in the body, if they contain an itemprop attribute. If the itemprop attribute is present on link or meta, they are flow content and phrasing content. The link and meta elements may be used where phrasing content is expected if the itemprop attribute is present. This extension is ...


6

You could use the itemref attribute. From the Microdata specification (Working Draft): 4.2 The basic syntax: Properties that are not descendants of the element with the itemscope attribute can be associated with the item using the itemref attribute. This attribute takes a list of IDs of elements to crawl in addition to crawling the children of the ...


5

It certainly does look like Google is treating these sites specially. When you see results from discussion forums in Google search results it contains various helpful bits of information, like dates and numbers of replies. So it looks like Google has written custom parsers for various popular forum engines. This blog post from 2009 announces it as a feature ...


5

I believe you are looking for schema.rdfs.org - pertinent links: RDF/XML JSON CSV


5

There is no definitive timeframe. In fact, there's no guarantee Google will use breadcrumbs in their search results for your pages. As with anything related to Google displaying search results, you can give them clues and express your wishes as for what to display in the search results but ultimately Google will decide if and when it will happen. All you can ...


5

Google recommends using microdata, but it does support three formats: microdata, microformats, and RDFa. A big reason to choose microdata would be that the examples that Google gives on it's website and those on schema.org are in the microdata format. Here is a site that has a huge table of the various advantages and disadvantages of the three formats. ...


4

Is Google treating these sites specially? As paulmorriss mentioned, Google does apply an algorithmic means for identifying forums and, interestingly enough, Yahoo Answers and Ask.MetaFilter show similar snippets (search "Does my dog have fleas?" or "What does my cat think I am?" ... ?!) so it's quite possible that Google is treating sites with a few key ...


4

From schema.org: This site provides a collection of schemas, i.e., html tags, that webmasters can use to markup their pages in ways recognized by major search providers. Search engines including Bing, Google and Yahoo! rely on this markup to improve the display of search results, making it easier for people to find the right web pages. Many ...


4

If there is a microformat for the data you have on your website and you wish to optimize your website for the search engines then you should use use microformats in your websites. How much of a difference it will make in your SEO efforts will vary just like every other thing that has to do with SEO. It will depend on lots of other factors. But if you want to ...


4

I used the instructions on the article How To Implement Rel=Author for creating my page. The only difference is that I had two rel=author links instead of one. I then tested the page with Google's rich snippets testing tool, and the first author that was linked was displayed as if it were the only author. The second author was not displayed at all. Multiple ...


4

You should use <meta itemprop="image" content="/uploads/images/medium/product_img.jpg"> Since src="" is associated with embedding content on the page and content="" is associated with embedding items off the page so to speak. This is the same method as used with the Facebook Open Graph meta as well, take a look: <meta property='og:image' ...


4

schema.org: Article, BlogPosting If something is a schema:BlogPosting, it is an schema:Article, too, isn't it? As schema:BlogPosting is a more specific schema:Article: More specific types BlogPosting NewsArticle ScholarlyArticle So you have an schema:Article, and now you may decide if one of these more specific types applies to your ...


4

Tool from Yandex The "Structured data validator" supports JSON-LD. Alexander Shubin (working for Yandex) wrote: Pls, take into account that in order to check JSON-LD you need to put it in tag (since this is how it should be embedded into html). E.g., <script type="application/ld+json">{ "@context":"http://schema.org", "@type" : ...


3

According to the HTML5 Working Draft: The author keyword may be used with link, a, and area elements. This keyword creates a hyperlink. For a and area elements, the author keyword indicates that the referenced document provides further information about the author of the nearest article element ancestor of the element defining the hyperlink, ...


3

I couldn't find any author-specific information, but the HTML specs do allow you to define more than one link with the same relationship, e.g. <link rel="alternate" hreflang="de" href="//de.example.com/my/page.htm"> <link rel="alternate" hreflang="en-gb" href="//uk.example.com/my/page.htm"> <link rel="alternate" type="application/rss+xml" ...


3

No, you don't need to duplicate the HTML exactly: microdata schemas are based on the microdata attributes. It doesn't matter (usually; e.g. links are an exception) what HTML tag those attributes are applied to. You may want to start by reading "Getting started with schema.org", if you haven't already.


3

It means the page that link points to will contain a list of links to other pages that are tagged by the anchor text of that link. For example, if a link looked like this: <a href="/tags/seo" rel="tag">SEO</a> The microformat tells the search engine, and any other user-agent, that the URL /tags/seo contains links to documents (i.e. pages, etc) ...


3

Honestly, I have a feeling it is about as elusive as getting Google Sitelinks. My recommendation is to follow the Google guide for Rich Snippits and when the site gets enough PageRank and keywords hits, it will naturally start appearing. Also be sure to watch your webmaster tools closely and address any issues Google finds. There is also a section called ...


3

As of right now, schema.org microformats are primarily used to display purposes in search results. So far there has not been any indication that they affect search results in any significant way. Plus with that particular format being easy to abuse i would suspect it would have no effect on rankings. I would speculate it will serve other purposes somehow ...


3

There are two properties: significantLink - URL - One of the more significant URLs on the page. Typically, these are the non-navigation links that are clicked on the most. significantLinks - URL - The most significant URLs on the page. Typically, these are the non-navigation links that are clicked on the most (legacy spelling; see singular form, ...


3

Source: http://support.google.com/webmasters/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=1211158 Google currently supports rich snippets for people, events, reviews, products, recipes, and breadcrumb navigation. So, no address information will be shown in SERP. However, Google may change it's algorithms some time later, like showing pin icon or anything else. And ...


3

Here is your example HTML in the testing tool. Works perfectly fine for me, with everything you say is a problem recognized, and no warning: The example code from Google's docs does display the warning, but that's because of a syntax error which is breaking the markup: <img class="photo" src="anvil_executive.jpg /> Note the src attribute is ...


3

Your rich snippet data needs to be visible to users. From Google's rich snippet troubleshooting: Is your marked-up content hidden from users? In general, Google won't display any content in rich snippets that is not visible to human user. It can be tempting to add all the content relevant for a rich snippet in one place on the page, mark it up, and ...


3

Open Graph markup is completely different from Schema.org markup usually displayed in individual meta tags in the site's header, like so: <meta property="og:type" content="website" /> Schema.org markup is used inline with the content and is used to mark up, or describe the content itself. Open Graph and Schema.org are two different things and have ...


3

Sadly, schema.org doesn't have every type of place, person or object on the planet. At this current time you only have 2 options, which are: <div itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Place"> <div itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/City"> Either are valid because a village, town and city is a place. City is more specific, which is also a ...


3

If the code is validated, no. The following is: <div itemscope itemtype="http://data-vocabulary.org/Breadcrumb"> <a href="http://www.example.com/" itemprop="url"> <span itemprop="title">Dresses</span> </a> </div> Gets validated with any of those tags (<span>, <li>, <div>) and many ...


3

They're using microformats, specifically hCard and hCalendar. Along with RDFa and JSON-LD, this is an alternative to microdata. See Google's Rich Snippet spec for people here, and here's my public LinkedIn page viewed with Google's structured data testing tool, showing a preview Rich Snippet and the extracted structured data.


2

My site had not yet had the rating and reviews index under my links, where other websites have and they use the bare minimum. Also, having the same micro formats on multiple pages affect this too? Just because you use microformats doesn't mean Google will automatically include rich snippets with your listing. Just like sitelinks they only do ...



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