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1

While the Editors Draft has been updated even as recently as yesterday (17-Nov-2014), the last Working Draft was published nearly a year ago (Dec-2013) and will be unstable, potentially completely incompatible with each next draft/phase and would not yet be deemed ready for use. I would certainly suggest you hold off implementation until it reaches the ...


1

To answer your question specifically, No. The <meta title="" content=""> has no effect on rank; for one simple reason; it is not content. Google pays attention to the title tag, h1 tag, other lesser header hags (h2, h3, ...), img tag alt text, URLs, links, and to a much lesser degree, the description meta-tag giving no or little weight to the terms ...


7

For HTML5, there is no title metadata name. You may only use values defined in the HTML5 spec or registered in the WHATWG wiki, and as title is not registered, you can’t have an element like: <meta name="title" content="…"> <!-- invalid in HTML5 --> In HTML 4.01, you may use any value (there is no registry): <meta name="title" ...


5

Google maintains a list of all the meta tags that it uses. It lists the <title> tag (although it notes that it is technically not a meta tag). It does not list <meta name="title"> tags. Most websites rank very well without meta tags named "title". I've never used such a tag myself before. Your use of a meta title tag would be ignored by ...


5

Search engines crawlers follow the most restrictive rule. If you use nofollow in your meta tag, no link will be followed. If you use follow in your meta tag, all links will be followed except those with rel="nofollow". So answer to your question is no, meta tag with follow doesn't override individual rel="nofollow". ...


2

I cant comment on whether this would work for all situations, but we use Schema.org in the manner you describe -- as meta "content" on the product pages. Why? It's just so much more portable and doesn't wreck up themes. It also allows more granular control on formatting the data, and it gets relevant data just after <body> (far above the fold). ...


2

Your plan of using meta data for microdata is not viable. Here is Google's FAQ about why it isn't showing your data in the search results: Is your marked-up content hidden from users? In general, Google won't display any content in rich snippets that is not visible to human user. Don't hide the content that you have marked up for rich snippets ...


0

Simply Yes. Title play immensely an important role in SEO. Having your important keywords optimized in Titles gives better ranking. It is also important to limit your title word count under 60 characters. Using heading is beneficial.


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Yes this is how it works. Duplicate page titles will have less effect. Also, various tools claim that you may encounter limits if if a page title is the same as the <h1> title. Its good to diversify those if you can. In page title, there are about 60 chars that SERPS will display so prioritize the best or most useful keywords first. Google may still ...


1

Oh heck yeah! Create a specific titles per page. Search engines use titles for a few things: To know the topic of the page. To gauge important topic keywords for the page. To create a search engine result page (SERP) link. How SEO works in it's simplest form is that each page would have a title tag that uniquely describes the topic of that page. The ...



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