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17

Give HTML5 some time to mature and gain wide acceptance and you might have some specific guidelines for SEO, but I don't think it will differ much from what's currently considered good practice. Either way, I think it's a little too early. In general, if it's good for your users, it will be good for SEO. Make your site accessible and usable. Use a good ...


13

If you need to jump users to in-page links, also known as fragment identifiers, you can set the id attribute (which is used for more than just frag ids) on any element. Then use the usual # in the URL of a href attribute of an a element. Here’s an example: <body> <p>Despite the many <a ...


12

schema.org: Article, BlogPosting If something is a schema:BlogPosting, it is an schema:Article, too, isn't it? As schema:BlogPosting is a more specific schema:Article: More specific types BlogPosting NewsArticle ScholarlyArticle So you have an schema:Article, and now you may decide if one of these more specific types applies to your ...


10

To speculate (because I think that's all you can do on this question without rigorous testing in an essentially uncontrollable environment) I personally doubt that there are yet ANY ranking factors associated with HTML5, for the same reason that Google doesn't assign quality points for valid HTML. There aren't enough sites using these structured elements ...


9

[A]re empty placeholder tags as a whole deprecated, and anchors can simply point to any element with an id instead? I prefer to jump users to heading tags (following MediaWiki's default behavior) where in-page links are needed, but yes, you could address the ID of any element.


6

The main thing I would keep in mind at the moment is that if your pages rely on meta-tags, you will want to test and monitor their acceptance regularly. For instance, for Google Webmaster Tools, if you want to verify ownership via meta-tag, you will have to place it in a "head" element (there are other ways to verify ownership, so generally that's not a ...


5

Assuming those search results are available to be crawled by search engines as their support for form submissions is very limited at best, repeating that text isn't going to hurt your SEO efforts at all. Text repeated in that manner is perfectly normal and common. I wouldn't change how you are doing or or worry about this at all.


5

In SEO perspective wrapping contents with <div> tags is not an issue but large amount unwanted coding will increase the bytes of data which may increase the PageSpeed. Here an extract from this source: Compacting HTML code, including any inline JavaScript and CSS contained in it, can save many bytes of data and speed up downloading, parsing, ...


4

It belongs ion the <html> tag: <html lang="en">


4

Yes, markup can be spread all over the page. In fact, you can try it out with Google's own Structured Data Markup Helper, which will allow you to highlight items on a page and see suggested marked-up HTML.


4

I think you'll find Dive Into HTML5, a book in progress, a great resource. Here's a relevant section on when and how to use new semantic elements. For your example, I think that you may be able to omit the <section> tag.


4

I like to use the <code> tag for anything code-like, hash-ish (pun), or data blocks. I use the <pre> tag for displaying direct ascii output (such as screen grabs from mainframes or art).


4

While your checkbox idea is much more efficient, I think you would have to avoid stating it as a question for it to make sense. For instance: <label for="the_question">I would answer yes to this long winded question.</label> <input type="checkbox" name="the_question" id="the_question" value="1"> However, if your designers are dead set on ...


4

At a microscopic level it might make a difference, but I would spend much more time worrying about things like your information architecture, server performance and the quality and quantity or links to your site.


3

I can't find any recent numbers on HTML usage, but this site has some figures from 2 years ago. Here's a small-scale poll of web developers (figures will be skewed since it's from a development site) from 2008 as well. But it's probably best to just choose your HTML version or doctype by looking at browser support. On new projects, you should just use the ...


3

In my view and experience, blog post schema should be used for posts on a blog. It contains all the properties you may require on a blog posts (albeit, so does article schema). The more a search engine utilises information provided via Schema, the more relevant your content becomes if it can be correctly identified (is marked up). I'd associate Articles ...


3

They're using microformats, specifically hCard and hCalendar. Along with RDFa and JSON-LD, this is an alternative to microdata. See Google's Rich Snippet spec for people here, and here's my public LinkedIn page viewed with Google's structured data testing tool, showing a preview Rich Snippet and the extracted structured data.


3

The impact of those styling tags (itself) is very big near nothing. Ok, why is this exactly not what it seems to be? Several sources are talking about the impact of CSS styling, the impact of responsiveness (See links at question), and the impact of semanticity and saying usually completely different things. (Not least because they are created at different ...


2

Interlinking. Google's original (and current) algorithm is based on links, I often explain it like this: Let's say that your website has a link from a webpage like ohio.gov/insurance/vendors/licensed-agencies/county/cuyahoga, without me listing the destination of the link, the anchor text of the link, or anything else, can you guess what line of business ...


2

Another problem with a code-heavy site is it takes the search engine spiders longer to crawl your pages. Even if bloated code does not affect page load time (from the visitor's perspective) the longer crawl time can negatively affect how the search engines rate your site. (It's not a major signal but every little bit helps.) From SearchEngineGuide.com: ...


2

I dont think anyone can give you specific advice on why respnsive design is so hard to code, but there are usually two approaches. A. you design for the smallest possible screen and work your way up (mobile first), or b you start with the largest possible screen and work your way down. You can get very elaborate with things, and its a matter of user ...


2

Having a duplicate set of navigation links isn't going to change how Google sees your site much. In fact, when Googlebot encounters a second link to the same destination in a page, it generally ignores it: PageRank is only passed to the first link Anchor text only counts for the first link Having duplicate navigation is very common. I've worked with ...


2

Where to begin? I will stick with Google because, Who knows what Bing is doing? Your question is actually a rather broad one that requires a bit of understanding. So once again, I will get into a mini-tutorial so that you better understand what you are asking and the answer. When people think of SEO, they think in terms of one page top-to-bottom and in a ...


2

In HTML5, the strong element can be used for "strong importance, seriousness, or urgency". I think none of these three cases matches your example, so you should not use the strong element. While "importance" may sound relevant, the definition makes clear that it’s for distinguishing the important part from other parts, but that doesn’t seem to be the case ...


2

Yes to both. Or mostly, depending upon a potential inaccuracy in your question. Textile is just a simplified markup convention. Browsers won't do anything with it; as far as they're concerned it's just text. You'll need a pre-processor of some sort to generate HTML from it. Some text editors support this directly, there are command-line scripts and ...


2

Sadly with anything Google there is nothing that is given in approx. time frames. This is because Google allocates resources to your site based on its authority and how busy their bot is. But in experience structured data normally appears between 1-6 weeks after the first index - it can take a few crawls before Google decides to display it within Google ...


2

As bybe mentioned, it can take a few weeks before your structured data begins to appear, and there have been some bugs in the reporting system lately. However, I should mention that if you use Google's Data Highlighter Tool to mark up your page, Google's testing tool will not pick it up. That's because the Highlighter Tool does not actually add HTML markup ...


2

The full answer to the question is answered by the W3C here: http://www.w3.org/International/questions/qa-http-and-lang.en @John Conde is correct that it should be included as part of the <html> tag, but there's also the important consideration of ensuring that it's included as part of the HTTP Headers. Most Meta elements are redundant replacements ...


2

<meta http-equiv="content-language" content="ll-cc"> what is this John Conde is correct that it should be included as part of the tag, but there's also the important consideration of ensuring that it's included as part of the HTTP Headers. Most Meta elements are redundant replacements or over-rides for information that should be sent as part of the ...


2

Possible answer, I will only select my answer as the correct one if up voted 3 times: http://w3techs.com/technologies/overview/markup_language/all Also, found these of interest too: Javascript Libraries http://w3techs.com/technologies/overview/javascript_library/all client-side programming ...



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