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10

A CMS of some sort really is a must nowadays in most cases. Making money off updating clients' sites may have been a business model in 1998, but isn't any more really. At the end of the day, of course, it's a question of cost, benefit and updating frequency. If a site needs changing once every two years, having static HTML pages that are re-worked manually ...


6

It's on case by case basis, but I would say that they are trying to build a user base first and monetize later on. Perhaps they have Venture Capital (VC) funding that is keeping them going for the moment. A prime example of this is Instagram, never made a penny, sold for $1bn, they effectively sold their user base to Facebook. Tumblr is another great ...


5

Sounds to me your after a Inline WYSIWYG Editor, there happens to be many on the market that you can integrate into your current setup. Of course a content management system is better if you want to allow more than yourself using the engine. Here's just a few to get you started: CKEditor TinyMCE Aloha Editor NicEdit Snippetedit Wymeditor ...


4

Here is a blog post that Dan Blumenthal (a friend of mine) wrote about shutting down a long time project and website. I think that he handles the situation well. Post about the shutdown fully explaining your reasoning on a blog so that people looking for the resource can figure out what happened after the fact. Email your users explaining the situation ...


3

Future browser compatibility isn't so much of an issue provided the website is designed to be future-proof (within reason) from the off - by that, I mean valid html/css that displays properly in a range of browsers on a number of devices. If your friend were to experience an influx of traffic, it is merely a case of upgrading the server or data transfer ...


2

"the site will […] manage itself" Yeah, sure. I hope that too for all my sites, but they never do anything alone. If you run a web-centric business, you need a permanent webmaster, who can fix bugs or help you if you suddenly have much more visitors, that your allowed via your hosting-contract and so on. He will at least need some maintenance contract with ...


2

Free: authorize e-mail addresses to send and receive mail from a Gmail account I use Gmail to send and receive mail for a variety of POP3 accounts at a variety of domains - it's worth the 2-3 minutes' setup time per account for the superior spam filtering alone.


2

Even if the client isn't asking for a CMS, I still install one. Partially, it's for consistency. I've been refactoring and improving my CMS for 5 years now, so I've got it to the point where it works for me (and my clients) really well. I know that it's a matter of one button click and a few text box answers to install the back-end, and my front-end code ...


2

I assume you are an individual and not representing a corporate portfolio of branded domain names, right? If you are that, then there are services like MarkMonitor that could help you, but will cost major money. If you are an individual, then you are similar to me. I have looked into this some myself and I am not aware of any company that will actually ...


2

Maybe not yet, I remember when Youtube and Facebook put no ads on their pages and video (pleade CMIIW but at least in my country was). But there are many ways for startup to pay the bill: donation, pro product, member or page promotion (e.g in your Twitter suggestion, page suggestion). Money is not always part of the main purpose. My friend told me that a ...


1

Maybe you can consider to sell your domain name under the condition that the new owner will place a good looking message about your shutting down and a link to how to find your new domain and your apps: a message in your wordings on his front page (or maybe somewhere else too), with your (old/new) logo for better recognition, in the px dimensions and ...


1

Yes, and you don't need a plugin. Just log into Plesk and go to: Server Management -> Tools & Settings -> Server Information (under the "Server Management" column) It breaks down the following: CPU Usage Physical Memory Usuage Virtual Memory Usage Hard Disk Usage You might also find "Server Health" helpful too, because it breaks down a lot of ...


1

I'm not entirely sure what you are exactly looking for but I have similar issues and this is how I handle the pain: Use Passpack.com to store your logins for CMS's, databases etc. Pass pack has a "1 click login" feature that is very useful for gettingo the relevant admin panels quickly. If you have a lot of sites using a particular CMS try to set up a ...


1

I really like Redmine for things like this. You set up each client as a project then you can have an ongoing (and easily searchable) wiki or timeline of events. It will hook into your VCS so you can even see code changes between clients and projects.


1

You have two options (assuming you will not be using server side scripting whish is implied in your question): 1) Use JavaScript - this allows you to dynamically check a username and password, set cookies, and reject users who fail authenticate. The downside to this is anyone who knows how JavaScript works can easily find the username and password in your ...


1

Is moving the DNS an option? I sounds like you want to use an external provider for DNS, so you have it all in one place. That way you can hunt around for a provider that matches all of your requirements and then change the relevant domains to point at their name servers. If you don't mind a little extra cost there are some companies who focus on providing ...


1

Just an update to the already good answer here: Microsoft's online email sites (e.g., Hotmail) have recently been converted to Outlook.com, which closely resembles the desktop version in form and function. Gmail's labels are slightly different than Outlook's folder concept: You first Create a Label and then have to Filter Messages with the "Skip Inbox" and ...



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