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70

HTTPS does not just provide secrecy (of which you are doubting the value, though there are good reasons for it still) but also authenticity, which is always of value. Without it, a malicious access point/router/ISP/etc. can rewrite any part of your site before displaying it to the user. This could include: injecting ads for your competitors injecting ads ...


20

"nothing secret on the site" ...According to you. There migh be a perfectly fine reason someone wants a secure connection. It (partly) creates privacy: My admin can see that I'm browsing some picture site on my phone via url, but he can't tell if I'm watching pics of cute cats or hardcore porn. I'd say that's pretty damn good privacy. "a content" and "...


10

(Parts taken from my answer to a similar question.) HTTPS can achieve two things: Authentication. Making sure that the visitor is communicating with the real domain owner. Encryption. Making sure that only this domain owner and the visitor can read their communication. Probably everyone agrees that HTTPS should be mandatory when transmitting secrets (...


9

You get HTTP/2 support, the new web standard designed to significantly improve website loading speeds. Because browser makers have chosen to support HTTP/2 only over HTTPS, enabling HTTPS (on a server that supports HTTP/2) is the only way to get this speed upgrade.


8

If your framework/CMS/whatever has the appropriate functions, you can include the scripting conditionally as @Michael suggests, but without the additional library. Taking your datatables case, for example, WordPress might handle the situation via something like: // For reference; this isn't functional code. if (is_page('whatever')) { <script src="/...


6

It prevents man in the middle attacks that make you think you are visiting your site but present a page that is actually from another and may attempt to get info from you. Since the data is encrypted, it also makes it more difficult for an attacker to manipulate the page as you see it. Because you need a SSL certificate, that verifies you are the owner of ...


6

You can use requirejs to dynamically load the libraries you need only on that pages. Then you only have to load the requirejs (which is about 14k) on all pages, saving about 385kb. Integration is also very easy: just "wrap" the code you have with the require include stuff: require(["jquery", "jquery.alpha", "jquery.beta"], function($) { //the jquery....


5

700kb of JavaScript IS a performance issue, because it must be parsed after page load. Because of it, you should take care, that only those scripts, that are needed, are loaded. One big JavaScript may be OK on full AJAX sites, such as GMail, when the navigation is handled internally without leaving the single page. However, even full AJAX sites do dynamic JS ...


5

This is because some image formats, such as PNG, JPEG and GIF can be saved in an interlaced/progressive form which allows the full image to be roughly rendered immediately, with an increasing level of detail added as more and more file data is received. This contrasts with the "baseline" format, which arranges the image data in a top-to-bottom fashion, which ...


4

The second request is made by the following CSS rule (lines 46 to 50 in your HTML-output): <style type="text/css" media="screen"> body{background:#f9f9f9 url('') ;} </style> Apparently url('') is interpreted by the browser as "the current url". So this CSS rule tries to load the current URL as background but since no image is returned it ...


4

This is a question that might be too broad for this platform. It's true that encryption carries a computational overhead, but with the right configuration, it can be negligible. This video from the middle of 2014 explains quite a bit about common problems and myths about the implementation of TLS, and why it can be slow, and why it shouldn't. My suggestion ...


4

Generally speaking, yes, off-loading comments will reduce your load pretty much inherently, since WordPress won't be dealing with the overhead of saving the comments, fetching them for display, etc. There will still be a small amount of db work involved as comments get synchronized, but after that it's almost all just storage. How much the difference ...


4

View source. It's Paul Irish's Infinite Scroll jQuery plugin, for WordPress.


3

Marketing firms like Hitwise pay ISPs to gather data about your site when you don't use SSL. Data about your site gets collected which you might rather not have your competitors know: user demographics visitor statistics popular pages search engine keywords (although with "not provided" this is less of an issue these days)


2

Yes it will help, but note that Facebook comments are stored only on the facebook site and not in your Wordpress database. Disqus, Intensedebate and Livewire are great offsite comment systems with the function that syncs the comments with your wordpress database.


2

First up, you definitely shouldn't put JSON files is a sitemap as they are meaningless to a search engine, which wants web pages. It wouldn't make sense for a user to land on your /Content/goldenglobes.json file. So if the site stays exactly as it is, then a sitemap provides zero benefit. However, if you are loading in content with JavaScript you may wish ...


1

You have two options to secure your main domain (mysite.com) and its sub-domains (play.mysite.com and test.mysite.com). SSL is not only for ecommerce, payment merchant sites where financial transactions or login credentials are shared over the website. It is as equally important for content-based website. Attackers always search for plain HTTP website or ...


1

In addition to the other answers, browsers should (as in RFC 2119) send the User-Agent header. It provides enough information about what platform a user is using if he sends the actual User-Agent. If Eve can eavesdrop on a request made by Alice, and Alice sends the actual User-Agent, Eve will know what platform Alice uses without Alice making a connection to ...


1

The simple answer is that there's no good reason not to. In the past there were arguments about only using SSL where absolutely necessary (e.g. on ecommerce sites collecting payment details). These were largely to do with the installation procedure for SSL certificates, cost, additional load on the webserver, and network limitations - at a time when people ...


1

Besides the benefits mentioned by others there is one reason that will make you switch to SSL unless you don't care about your visitors that use Chrome - the new versions of Chrome (starting from the end of the year as far as I remember) are going to show a warning (which will drive away users from your site) by default for all sites that aren't using HTTPS. ...


1

This may not be feasible. In-page static content can be considered loaded as soon as the page url is retrieved. Separate assets such as CSS, JS, images, dynamic content, etc. are loaded individually. For CSS, JS, and dynamic content, it's not possible to automatically tell if they affect things above the fold or not until they're loaded. Never mind the ...


1

It is not the number of users but the number of transactions. You had 3456 in about 300 seconds which equals 11.52 transactions per second with the longest transaction taking 1.95 seconds. This seems within the good range to me. You may be able to tune Apache and MySQL some to handle more transactions, but I would not bother until you start to get to 8-10 ...


1

Estimates can vary widely depending on how long the database queries take and whether there is any caching involved, along with the amount of RAM, processing speed, and many other factors on the server itself. However, as a very large ballpark I would generally expect any reasonably simple website on a modern server with updated software to be able to ...


1

It's more important if one or more of your plugins is a known resource hog, not how many plugins you use or not. Try to implement caching if you don't have yet, that's always a good starting point. For wordpress install W3 Total Cache or WP Super Cache. See this draft about Testing Wordpress Performance. Do you have some webanalytics software installed (...


1

~700kb of JavaScript is a performance issue and if compressed and we have to see the Rules to be followed while dealing to optimize the Code are: Minify Javascripts - Simply you are compressing and decompressing, which didn't reduce the code, First of all use the good Minify JS tool and Minify your code. You are 12 Files and each file would be Minify ...


1

Can internal linking create excessive web server load? Not unless your server is already struggling - Googlebot (unlike many poorly-conceived spiders and some recursive downloading agents) throttles requests and even allows webmasters to specify how often Googlebot should visit pages via Google Webmaster Tools (if your server is already struggling). ...


1

It is the trailing slash that is triggering the issue. Your server is handling non-existent directories by sending them to the home page. You should be getting a 'Page doesn't exist error' instead. If you are on a linux account, you may want to check you .htaccess settings. Otherwise I would look into your link structure. Why do you have the trailing ...


1

Check to make sure your cases match between the URL and the file itself. contactUs.php is not the same as contactus.php. I've never used MAMP but it's possible that it doesn't care about case; I know that XAMPP under Windows treated URL's as case-insensitive, which caused me some problems when moving to GoDaddy's Linux hosting.



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