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1

Technically, a URL can be 2083 characters long but some say the real limit is 2000. I am not about to test this. Okay. Not what you are looking for? Remember that there is a lot of advice out there some of it very real, some silly as [redacted], and some culled completely from the dark smelly nether-regions (you know... New Jersey!). The practical reality ...


0

Google uses "deception" fairly broadly, it can either mean deceiving the user (i.e. if your link that says "skip to text" actually sent you an ad or pop-up or whatever, basically if it does not in fact skip to the text) or it can mean deceiving/manipulating Google (i.e. the example above in @SE505's answer where the hidden text is being used to ...


14

For what it's worth, I'll offer my own take on this. Hidden text alone is not deceptive. What you do with it is what determines whether it's deceptive. There are many scenarios in which hidden text is a good thing, both in terms of accessibility, functionality and just pure awesomeness. But there are also some setbacks, and times where hidden text may ...


4

Other answers say that Google would allow this, but they don't say what hidden text Google penalizes for. Google only considers hidden text deceptive when: There are hidden keywords that users might search for but then be upset when they find that your site doesn't have them. Users are not likely to be searching for "skip to content" The hidden text ...


11

I agree with w3d’s answer, there should be no problem with Google Search or any other search engine. However, I suggest to make it visible anyway. Not for SEO, but for accessibility: Screen reader users are not the only users that can benefit from skiplinks. Skiplinks are useful for all users that navigate with the keyboard, and only a subset of those ...


7

I can't see any reason why Google would think a hidden "Skip to content" link was deceptive. Are you flooding the page with hidden keywords or trying to deceive the search engines? No. Google is no doubt very aware of "skip to content"-like links. They have been recommended by the W3C after all. Google does state (in the article you link to) that "not all ...


1

If you view the source code of the page as its cached in Google, you will see the links: You won't see them when just viewing the source code as some one has hacked your site, injected the links and set them so they only display when Google-bot is crawling the site. They do this to build back links which can help the SEO of the sites they are linking to. ...


2

Originally, I was mistaken and @Max steered me in the right direction. Thanks @Max!! Forever grateful! I apologize in advance for the error and confusion. You do want to link your desktop pages to your mobile pages with canonical links. However, you have to link each page to the corresponding page between the desktop and mobile versions. From mobile: ...


4

Computers, mobiles and tablets can send fax's with software, its just like sending an email, it was added to rfc2086 15 years ago but it never took off and as far as I know no major browsers support href="fax:" they do however support href="tel:" that can be used just the same to send a fax using software. 2.3 "fax" URL scheme The URL syntax is ...



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