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Browsers do not try one protocol and then fall back to the other. The browser will use which ever protocol it is linked to. If that protocol isn't supported, the user will get an error. If you want to force users to use one protocol, you can redirect from one to the other. For example, to force secure connection on your site use the following rewrite ...


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// basically means that the a resource will be requested in the same protocol, thus if someone is browsing httpS://yourwebsite.com, and you include a stylesheet like //yourwebsite.com/style.css, it will load httpS://yourwebsie.com/style.css. If you request resources from http when the page is https, the browser may give an error. To answer your questions: ...


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This is a way old question but it just popped up in stream. Here is my observation on how this seems to work. PR is either made from thin air, passed to you from another site, or both. In the case of standard followed backlinks, they generate tiny PR then pass bigger PR. In the case of nofollow backlinks, they generate tiny PR but pass no extra PR. I ...


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As mentioned is this answer there is a new method of doing this: Referrer Policy/meta tag. See spec and example in this q&a.


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Repeating a link will not cause extra PageRank to be passed to that page, nor will it cause link juice to get lost. Google usually only pays attention to the anchor text from the first link. If one of the links has a rel nofollow on it, then Google treats all the duplicate links as if they were nofollowed. (Why should they trust any if you say they can't ...


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You would write the following in Template:PMC: [http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC{{{1}}}/ PMC {{{1}}}] And then call it with {{PMC|2824929}}. Of course this doesn't verify that the number is valid or even that one has been provided.


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Google looks at registration, DNS, whois, host, network, contact, citation, social, and any other information that is available and determines what sites have relationships with other sites. In addition, links are evaluated and mapped to look for linking patterns regardless of what pattern may present itself. It is an AI function and not hard-coded. Being in ...


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Like @JohnConde said, Google isn't going to credit your website if the ultimate 301 is pointing to YouTube. If you want the biggest bang for your buck, why don't you embed the YouTube hosted videos on your site? You could create a playlist with each video first as well as some other videos secondarily, but either way the user has the option to view the ...


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Search engines follow redirects so this won't affect SEO unless you are blocking the redirect script (which you shouldn't be doing). The final destination of the link after redirects will get credited for the link.


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HTTP/HTTPS Backlinks Google will treat both backlinks the same since they are protocols and technically the same site, however...! If someone links to your site using HTTP:// and your site is HTTPS only then a redirect action will be required and whenever using a 301 redirect some juice is lost, but its a tiny weenie! amount! and nothing worth worrying ...


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Technically speaking, http and https are two different sites, and hence it is highly recommended that you setup a http to https version redirect while migrating to https. Linking directly to https will help. When you do a 301 redirect, a very small amount of link juice is not passed to the newer version. This is a long-time known issue. I guess it makes ...


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Your terminology of "potentially copyrighted" is problematic. Everything created since 1989 has a copyright unless the author specifically disclaims it and announces that the work is in the public domain. In almost every country, pretty much everything online has copyright protection. Bitlaw has an article about the legality of linking. The most ...



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