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30

There's no circularity implied by having <link rel='canonical' href='http://www.example.com/product/foo' /> appear as http://www.example.com/product/foo. That's the intent. You're saying "the best URL" for this page is http://www.example.com/product/foo, so when the search engines hit http://www.example.com/product/foo?id=1, or ...


24

According to SEOmoz's article Link Title Attribute and its SEO Benefit: The title attribute can be used to describe almost any HTML element. A beneficial way to use the title attribute for SEO purposes would be to use it in the link element to provide descriptive text within an anchor tag (which gives you more real estate for your targeted keyword phrases). ...


22

The problem about "click here" links is that they are not meaningful, as obviously a link is there to be clicked! You should try to link something that describes what you are linking. For instance, instead of using: There are several books about cooking: link1 link2 link3 You could write There are several books about cooking: The art of cooking 500 ...


14

Linking out to relevant sites is never a bad thing and may possibly help your rankings (source). The only time linking to another site may hurt you is when the site is considered by Google to be part of a bad neighborhood (sites that are created to crosslink themselves and boost their ranking or ranking of a main site). By linking to them you are ...


13

On using Asterix in URLs Using an Asterix in your URL is probably not such a great idea, largely because: Neither UTF-8 or ASCII is currently able to denote an Asterix. He would be little more than a smudge in a standard browser address bar. I doubt he'd like it very much. And he has some quite large friends. It's just weird. On using Asterisks in URLs ...


11

I would advise against doing it. Search engines get better and better at detecting such tricks. No matter what you do, some day search engines will notice it. It's not worth it and it's certainly not "white hat". From http://www.google.com/support/webmasters/bin/answer.py?answer=35769 (emphasis mine): Make pages primarily for users, not for search ...


10

Yes, because it's a reserved character. Other reserved characters The asterisk ("*", ASCII 2A hex) and exclamation mark ("!" , ASCII 21 hex) are reserved for use as having special significance within specific schemes. From here: http://www.w3.org/Addressing/URL/4_URI_Recommentations.html EDIT: Section 2, on characters, has been rewritten to ...


10

Yes, the ALTernate attribute acts as 'anchor text' for links that contain images. A recent test found both Bing and Google indexed/ranked ALT attribute values: http://www.webmasterworld.com/google/4265397.htm Also, you need to consider that Google operates functionally like the lowest common browsing denominator (like a Lynx browser, or as one SEO put it ...


10

Technically, "#" is a well-defined URL reference that points to the start of the current document, so it is not “broken” in formal sense. It can, however, be regarded as bad for accessibility, and it is also a common symptom of “fake” links, i.e. a elements that are supposed to link to something external but depend on JavaScript. (In the very old days, <a ...


10

Google does not just ignore links in sections that are display:none. Consider DHTML multi-level drop down menus. In such a menu, you hover over the top level menu item and a list of links drops down. That is a case in which the links are in display:none initially, but user interaction with the page shows them. Using drop down menus like this is ...


10

As long as the number is balanced and the link targets are not spammy sites, then there is no reason to worry about. However, you may want to add some sort of filter that allows dofollow links only to users with a trusted reputation. Another alternative is to limit the maximum number of links in a document. You can either set an absolute limit or compute ...


8

I don't believe that this can be done. The code for the like button has to identify if you are logged into an account and if so rather or not you've liked the topic already. This couldn't be done in plane HTML. The closest you could get is the iframe that you mentioned.


8

It's important to start a URL with a / so that the intended URL is returned instead of its parent or child. Let's say if your browsing /cream-cakes/ then you have a link on the page that has blah.html without the forward flash its going to attempt to visit page /cream-cakes/blah.html while with the forward flash it'll assume you mean the top level which ...


7

That is correct. It is the HTML entity for an ampersand (&) and is the proper character representation of it in a properly encoded URL. Ampersands (&) and well as < and > are special characters in XML and HTML and need to be displayed using their special character entities.


7

As far as SEO benefits nothing stands out as being truly beneficial other then canonical. The only other SEO possible benefits I can see from using the <link> tag is when using start/next/previous to indicate pages related to the current one, like in a multi-page article, to help the search engines understand the relationship between those pages. ...


7

Linked text should tell a visitor what they will find on that page W3C offers this advice about how to use link text in their Web Content Accessibility Guidelines: Good link text should not be overly general; don't use "click here." Not only is this phrase device-dependent (it implies a pointing device) it says nothing about what is to be found if ...


7

I'd prefer to do a <a href="" title="whichever the text"></a> Anyway, that seems to be a premade Dokuwiki tag? Which actually adds a javascript that initially sets a display:none to the block. If is the case I think it would not harm SEO.


7

That theme is from some collection posted on a Blogspot site. Read this: Why You Should Never Search For Free WordPress Themes in Google or Anywhere Else There's a pretty good chance nobody edited anything, and the link was there in the first place. If, for whatever reason, you're set on continuing to use that particular theme, the Authenticity Checker and ...


7

Looking at bots vs. browsers, they display every user agent that's ever visited their page. Some clever spammer realised that this would be a clever way to drive traffic to their sites, because webmasters/anyone looking at the site is probably going to wonder why there's a url in the user agent, think it's a new specification or something, and visit the url ...


7

In general, from a SEO point of view, read more links are implemented on blogs for the following reasons: to avoid duplicate content between homepage and articles (the main reason) for visitors to see more article titles on the home page (to act as a sort of table of contents) to pass more PageRank to an article if the read more links point to an anchor in ...


7

There is no such thing as "dofollow". All links are followed unless specifically stated otherwise (nofollow).


6

Your Sitemap file must be UTF-8 encoded (you can generally do this when you save the file). As with all XML files, any data values (including URLs) must use entity escape codes for the characters. This may help out, http://sitemaps.org/protocol.php


6

Start by using Ontolo's free SERP dominator tool (free registration required) this will let you know which sites specifically are ranking across your top keywords (IE the most powerful) even if you think you know it's worth the 5 minutes it takes to run the report because you'll usually find a surprise or two. then buy your comepetitor's backlink profiles ...


6

People use all sorts of things for links. Use whatever makes sense for your actual design. The icon you're currently using is fairly common and well-known. For whatever it's worth, I don't think I've ever encountered that → character in this use. Asking if it's a replacement kind of assumes there's a standard in the first place; there isn't. Such ...


6

Hi NotMuchOfAProgrammer, It's not a real backlink since the JavaScript is injecting the URL after the page has been loaded. If you disable JavaScript you will see: <noscript> <a href="http://ads.garden.org/www/delivery/ck.php?n=aa4a0d78&amp;cb=INSERT_RANDOM_NUMBER_HERE" target="_blank"> <img ...


6

Does the leading '/' mean the path is starting from the site root? Technically this is referenced in section 4.2 of RFC 3986 as an "absolute-path reference": A relative reference that begins with a single slash character is termed an absolute-path reference. It ensures the path is absolute to the root directory and not the current directory ...


5

Outgoing links from Facebook, for example, to a website are caught by a redirect script ("Are you sure you want to leave Facebook?") - these links are definitely not counted toward the PageRank of the destination site. Internal links within Facebook (i.e. links to the Facebook page within Facebook's indexes) will not have a nofollow or robots.txt ...


5

To me your menu sounds unusable. I don't believe anyone would go through all the links without crying. I really think the best thing to do in your case is to redo your navigation, or have an information architect look at your site. In your case I would think less about Google and more about users. If you focus on making users happy Google will be too.


5

In google type: link:yoursite.com Also their webmaster tools will give you a better rundown. Bing also has webmaster tools.


5

No, links inserted with Javascript will not be crawlable. You are better using a server-side solution to add links, i.e. output <a href="link">etc</a> direct in your HTML. Having said that, search engines are always improving. Google recently announced major improvements to the crawling of Flash files, so it's not impossible that some Javascript ...



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