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11

You've really got two licenses there: The Apache License 2.0 and the MIT License. Both have restrictions that require copyright and other notices to remain intact. As indicated here for the Apache License under Licensing conditions: in every licensed file, any original copyright, patent, trademark, and attribution notices in redistributed code must be ...


5

You're not likely to find much of a direct statement from companies about this, because they don't have to say anything. Your question is covered by the base trademark laws and fair use. (At least in the US. Other countries may have different arrangements, or no such concept at all, but that starts moving out of our scope and requires your own research if ...


3

Usually, their license information is also within the .js and .css files that you are using for your JavaScript and CSS. As an example, I use a lot of bootstrap colours from Bootswatch which are premade themes and colour sets. Here is an example of one of the license information within the bootstrap.css file: /*! * Bootswatch v3.1.1+1 * Homepage: ...


3

You seem to be confusing "free font" with some sketchy site allowing you to download [something] for free. This is like assuming some music album is free because you found a torrent for it. If you want to know if Monotype's Gill Sans is free, then you ask Monotype, not "FontPalace." It's very much not. If you want to use Monotype fonts for web embedding, ...


3

From the .pro official website: .PRO is an exclusive top-level domain reserved for use exclusively by licensed business and service professionals and entities internationally. All applicants meeting the following qualifications may register a .PRO domain name: Provides professional services Admitted to or licensed by a government certification ...


3

It is legal to make money from a website using that software.


2

You should really contact the copyright/trademark holder (as images they are subject to copyright) and ask their permission. It may well be that they have a page on their website with suitable icons you can download and use, but you should not assume that any image you pull off their website (for example) is free to use. What you need to be aware of is not ...


2

You would need to read the static maps terms of service. If there is nothing in there barring such customization then you can go ahead.


2

Web design is not a regulated industry such as law, medicine, accounting or engineering. That's why there's no requirement for you to get a web design license in order to practice web design. Secondly, the W3C offers no certificates for web design or otherwise. W3School offers one, but they're an unrelated commercial organization that has no regulatory ...


2

My answer is in no way any sort of legal advice. I am not a lawyer and have actually no idea how copyright and licences may or may not work in your country. The GNU.org website pretty much covers it all. I quote (emphasises by me): If a program P is released under the GPL that means any and every part of it can be used under the GPL. If you integrate ...


1

It looks like it was taken from a video, rather than created for a gif. Specifically, this one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z5uHt4AwYb4 I personally wouldn't worry about copyright issues in this case - the fact the video has been there since 2007 suggests that the owner isn't that bothered, even though he is more likely to make money from selling ...


1

This is confusing because there are 2 pieces of information here that are not intuitive. First is the license that this theme is distributed under, GLPv2. Short answers is that GPLv2 allows you to modify and distribute as you see fit. You can ready about the specifics here - http://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl-2.0.html The second piece of information is the ...


1

Dump it, apply for a license, download their current, up-to-date package, install it and proceed from there. If you liked what you saw, then your purchased install will be legitimate. Proceeding with the current state of affairs without purchasing the template is theft and often Karmic in that when you run into problems in implementation, you have no ...


1

I'm sure you could modify this to suit your needs: http://sawapan.eu/sections/section84_disclaimer/disclaimer.html Just be sure to change all of the names and Entities in it.


1

First of all, if you're interested in corner cases, you really should read the actual license (the "legal code") instead of just the summary. I think that would clarify things for you. Second, IANAL, but I doubt that the use cases you describe would infringe upon the original work's copyright, at least under most jurisdictions. Thus, you don't need a ...


1

For the first question - I'm not a lawyer, but every search engine crawler is indexing both copyright and Creative Commons text, so that's probably OK to do. For the second question, you are taking the text and links and remixing them. You are not just saying "for this word go to this page (on wikipedia)" like search engines do. So you can do that, so long ...


1

I would expect a contract for a website design and development to contain clauses that transfer the rights to the design and code to the client after the work is done. So it is no longer "your" code and design, save for personal rights. What you are really asking here is what you can do if your client wants to change the contract. That depends on the ...



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