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Your find a lot of information by searching on Google, with any website if the website is accessible by a country or regional zone then you most comply with their rules and laws, if you don't agree then you should make attempts to notify users or block those users from your website. Hosting a website in X, a domain in X doesn't mean it can't break laws in ...


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The checkmarked answer above includes 3 samples and states "...i.e these are all the same:" NOTE that all three notations are not created equally, 2 are incomplete. US copyright law requires 3 components in a legal notification : the copyright symbol or the word "Copyright" or abbr "Copr." date of publication (or date range, 1st publication-to-most-recent ...


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Depending of the personal info you want to collect. If you want a Name/e-mails for example, for a subscribers list or something like that - you are good to go without company. Of course you must have the right Privacy Policy and you shouldn't misuse the collected information. For certain types of PII however you'll need not only a company, but certifications ...


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As Su` suggested there is a legal process for this. They are ultimately domain name squatting and there are clear rules for domain name resolution stating how to go about it and that Trademarks for example are used to support the process - the aim of this is to force the other party to hand over the domain name which is in your company's name. The domain ...


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Google was forced to show this when the EU regulators got very antsy about data protection and gave them a deadline to sort out how they use customer data and declare that usage. ZDNet have a summary of the issue here and if you're really keen, you can read the whole ammendment here


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The big legal question is whether visitors to your website will confuse you with the corporate Google. If you set up a math website that talked about 10^100 and all its implications, you'd likely be fine (especially if you included a "I have nothing to do with Google™" statement on every page). If you set up a "I work for Google, and here's all the ...


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Found this article which might help: Obviously, this is a sensitive situation. No merchant wants to offend honest customers by turning the shopping experience into what feels like a prosecution. At the same time, you can't afford to turn a blind eye to fraud. The major card issuers have published recommendations on what to do if you or a ...



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