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8

1) Yes ii) Unknown, but it may help to keep the information under seal in the court records instead of being accessible to anyone who requests the records of the case. C) I wouldn't at this time. This has very little to do with you personally. The plaintiff is attempting to show that Google acted in an arbitrary or capricious fashion when they closed his ...


1

Websites are one of those funny things in the international environment. Many countries have written into their laws that sites which specifically target their country must comply with domestic laws regardless of ccTLD. In addition to that, the registry for the ccTLD may have in its Terms of Service (TOS) which country has jurisdiction over domains ...


8

According to Judge William A. Fletcher's opinion on Office Depot v. Zuccarini, the jurisdiction over a domain name is dependant on the jurisdiction of the domain name registry. The registry for .com domains is VeriSign, which is headquartered in Virginia, USA. Assuming that the judge's opinion is still applicable, this means the jurisdiction of .com domain ...


2

In addition to Pit's answer, also there's matter of copyrighted material. Most of the companies have registered name / trademark, so you need to ask them if they are willing to participate.


3

Depends on the company. Some might be ok with you using the logo, some might not be ok, some might even require you do follow certain rules. For example Microsoft has very specific rules for using their logo: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/legal/intellectualproperty/trademarks/usage/logo.aspx


5

Depends what you do with it. If it's an innocent use that has nothing to do with the family in question, you are probably fine. I'm sure there are people with the given name Trivago out there. They don't get any rights to the Trivago trademark. If someone "took it personally" and tried to sue you, they'd get spanked out of court, possibly with sanctions ...


4

There is no current legal claim that can easily be made for a name as property with the exception of proven lineage. For example, Lord McDonald who's family has operated a restaurant for 700 years, threatened to sue McDonalds (the fast food chain) if it did not cease and desist it's persuit of a small restaurant owner in England. In this case, lineage and ...



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