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18

The US is a member of the Berne Convention which means users have the Copyright for their work and even have it without notice on the work itself (although I would recommend using it). (For a full list of countries who this also applies to see the list of other members. You automatically have the copyright to any work you create. There isn't an official ...


16

The Better Business Bureau Online has a Sample Privacy Notice which is as good as any in terms of a simple, but thorough policy. It has these sections: Our Commitment To Privacy The Information We Collect How We Use Information Our Commitment To Data Security Our Commitment To Children's Privacy How To Access Or Correct Your Information How To Contact Us ...


13

From the "Gov Internet Program Guidelines" on DotGov.gov: No Political or Campaign Information: The Gov Internet domain is for the operation of government, not the political, political party, or campaign environment. No campaigning can be done using .gov domains. However, I'm pretty sure that GOP.gov doesn't put forth a purely unbiased viewpoint. In my ...


12

Ends up with a message saying it's blocked by Adobe. FontSquirrel allows font publishers to request to be put on a blacklist. Not only that sometimes if the font can be converted, it often looks like crap when viewed in a browser. Sometimes automated conversion doesn't turn out perfectly and adjustments or alterations to the fonts are needed. ...


11

Unless you had a pre-existing contract with them that required you to renew the domain or notify them of cancellation, then they cannot charge you. AT domain registration So basically, it depends on whether or not there were explicit terms from your registrar about this occurring; which if there are, you should be able to find them on your registrar's ...


11

Yes it is a legal requirement to display company registration details on a UK based website. It's also good practise - it'll will reassure the company's customers that it's a serious organisation. Out-Law site contains the relevant information. The name, geographic address and email address of the service provider. The name of the organisation with ...


11

I know you said the client doesn't want to get lawyers involved, but um, your client needs to get a lawyer involved. An SEO slap fight just isn't going to fix this, and if it's the route they want to go then they don't get to complain about promotions sending business to the competitor since that's kind of the core of the entire problem. Everything from here ...


11

You've really got two licenses there: The Apache License 2.0 and the MIT License. Both have restrictions that require copyright and other notices to remain intact. As indicated here for the Apache License under Licensing conditions: in every licensed file, any original copyright, patent, trademark, and attribution notices in redistributed code must be ...


10

There definitely is a hard line that you cannot cross. You'll have to talk to a trademark attorney if you want exact details. But if you're using a trademark in your domain and the site is related to the trademark you can bet it is ripe for a lawsuit if the trademark holder decides they want to sue. Of course, they may just request you hand the domain name ...


10

The "excitement" relates to confusion about how the new directive (PDF: 2009/136/EC) should be interpreted and implemented, and whether or not it's fair to European webmasters: Do the laws apply to third party cookies? The UK data protection body in charge of enforcing the laws in Britain says in their guidelines that they're seeking clarification (see my ...


10

The short answer is that no-one knows yet. The long answer is that 3rd party cookies are a hazy area; it's not clear from the directive (PDF) who would be prosecuted for failing to obtain consent when storing 3rd party cookies. The ICO's current interpretation and advice, published in "Changes to the rules on using cookies...", admits that they don't know ...


10

It's potentially illegal and also morally wrong. Basically, if you would be unhappy for someone to read your private messages then it's wrong (morally) and I suspect it would be considered criminal under one of these Canadian Laws (technically the crime would be committed at the location of the server):- Section 342 of the Criminal Code of Canada ...


10

The UK Information commisioner says in their guidance document on cookies: "An organisation based in the UK is likely to be subject to the requirements of the Regulations even if their website is technically hosted overseas." So it depends on where you are based, not where you are hosted.


10

Kim Dot Com was a German operating servers in New Zealand and yet the FBI still raided him. Despite the raid being deemed entirely illegal in hindsight, that data and business was destroyed regardless. Basically you can not avoid the US claiming jurisdiction wherever they please unless you work in countries like China because the US has no regard for ...


8

I AM NOT A LAWYER AND THIS IS NOT LEGAL ADVICE! Update I was browsing an article on Blogger Law and I came across this direct issue. Here is an example case they cited: A leading case in the area of trademark disputes is Continental Airlines, Inc. v. continentalairlines.com. In that case, the dotcom was simply re-routing visitors to a travel site ...


8

So long at it is a summary/review, and it doesn't plagiarise the book directly i.e. include large sections of it simply cut and pasted text, then it should come under fair use. The key things are the amount of copy used, credit and the context. If it's presented as a review or summary and a small amount of the book i.e. a sentence or two is used word for ...


7

As always, your best and most definitive course of action is to seek actual legal counsel with experience in copyright law. I'm not a lawyer and, as such, the following should be viewed only as my opinion and not legal advice. The key phrase in the PDF that MrChrister linked to is: if the parties expressly agree in a written instrument signed by them ...


7

First you will need to know the laws and regulations in the country you are hosting the site and creating "the content". Minimum legal ages and so on. Second, you need to check the T&C of your hosting provider; many will explicitly say hosting adult material is not allowed. If you are self-hosting, you should check your internet service provider since ...


7

All of the above. You have to make sure you follow all of the rules set forth by the Chinese Gov't or whomever controls the .cn TLD. If you do not meet their criteria for use of a .cn domain name they can revoke it from you. If your business, or you if you aren't a registered business, is located in the Netherlands, then you are subject to their laws. If ...


7

as usual, IANAL, but this page was written by a Lawyer: http://www.ericgoldman.org/Articles/websiteliabilityalert.htm Cooley Godward continues to believe that websites should take steps to avoid knowing their users’ activities and content and, in most cases, reduce indicia of their right and ability to control user behavior and content. Thus, we propose ...


7

The Facebook platform policy explains the rules. In particular: You may cache data you receive through use of the Facebook API in order to improve your application’s user experience, but you should try to keep the data up to date. ... By “basic account information” we mean: name, email, gender, birthday, current city, and profile picture ...


7

Your designer should supply fonts with their license agreements, or be able to link to the agreement on the web that makes it clear whether or not the fonts can be used online. For example, the bundled fonts included with Photoshop and other Creative Suite applications are only licensed for use on the computer they were installed on [source]; you can't use ...


7

Here is a list of policies: Permissions. If your issue isn't covered in these, I suggest you Contact Them via email.


6

Take screenshots for proof. Then write to the various parties involved the documents they require so the content can be removed. Focus on the plagiarism of your copyrighted content (uniqueness of products sold is your word against theirs). Send the site owners a cease and desist letter. Send their web host a DMCA takedown notice. This can be determined ...


6

Is it legal to use translated comments from other sites? Depends upon the terms and conditions set forth by the website whose content you are using. Most sites, by default, don't allow others to use their content without their permission. Other sites, like the Stack Exchange sites, are released under a creative commons license. If the content you want ...


6

First, I am not a lawyer and if you continue to receive legal threats then you should definitely lawyer up. There is nothing wrong with posting direct, measurable facts as a comparison. For example, "our product costs x dollars, whereas Company B's costs y dollars". Stick to that and you'll be fine. Don't forget to add a date disclaimer (e.g. "* All ...


6

If its a clear and up-front trademark infringement, they probably by law, already own it. These cases don't turn out well if you decide to attempt to get money out of a corporation that's spent money on a lawyer to protect their IP rights on trade/service marks they own. Protection of trademark and patent rights gets pretty aggressive as they don't like to ...


6

Magnet links are legal just as any other link. Magnet links created for the illegal distribution of copyrighted content is another matter. There are no laws against hosting torrent trackers, torrent hubs/aggregators, or even hosted file sharing services. Just because copyrighted content can be illegally distributed via HTTP or FTP doesn't mean those ...


6

No one will actually be able to answer this until there is a test case in front of a court, then there is a separate question of how enforcement will work. I would suspect that the likely outcome of any case will be that any website hosted on a European domain name or server will be covered by the law, and this will be enforced by the registries. Equally ...



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