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25

There are many acceptable ways to structure your site for both SEO and internationalization. Each have advantages and disadvantages. Top Level Domains Buy the same domain name at multiple top level country domains like example.com, example.es and example.de. Advantages Fully supported by Google. You can add the sites to Google Webmaster Tools where ...


14

Answering a question similar to yours on his blog, Matt Cutts suggests: If you have sites with say French and German versions for a business, my preferences would be: ccTLDS such as example.fr or example.de After than, subdomains such as fr.example.com or de.example.com. If that’s not possible, I’d use subdirectories such as ...


11

Content-language is going away soon (note the big red "obsolete"), and I'm not sure language was ever official. The W3C recommends this instead: <html lang="en"> The lang attribute works with most tags (except <script />, <br />, <frame />, etc), so you can mix, match, and cascade: <p>This is English, since the html tag ...


11

In my opinion, you should use either the folder or subdomain approach, because they are more intuitive to the user. Which one is a matter of personal taste, I personally find the folder approach clearer. The filename option is far less intuitive. Parsing the Accept-Language header for directing the user to the correct content on his first visit is a good ...


10

I've been told that .htaccess should be avoided when possible, as it reduces the server performance and new servers disables it or just don't implement it anymore. The part about compatibility is absolutely not true; the part about performance is kinda true but probably irrelevant for you. What the person you quote was probably talking about is that ...


8

As a German user I hate it when a website won't let me on the English page because it's think it knows better what I want. It might be hard for Americans to understand but there are actually people who speak more than one language. Sometimes I might want to view the German websites and sometimes I might want to view the English one. Simply parsing the ...


5

rel=translation has been proposed but not adopted by the W3C (it's not in the HTML5 working document). If the words on the pages are different then Google won't penalize you for duplicate content (several people say this in the Webmaster forums). There's lots of advice on multi-language sites in this blog post.


5

This is the same question I asked on StackOverflow. And I got a recource for it, ill post the answer. I have found a nice resource from Google on the choices you can make. There is a section with pros and cons of each method you can use. I have been struggling with the multi-lingual websites for a while now. There are definitely some points in the article ...


5

Use subdomain option if you use localized versions (i.e. France != French). Use subdomains, but I think it's better use directories if this country uses diferent languages. For example: us.domain.com (USA) us.domain.com/en/sample.html (USA - english) us.domain.com/es/ejemplo.html (USA - spanish) es.domain.com (Spain) es.domain.com/es/ejemplo.html (Spain - ...


5

The only way to change this is by replacing the button, (e.g. with SWFUpload) but I don't see why you would want to. You shouldn't change the user's system language. They've chosen their system language for a reason, and there's an expectation that their UI will be rendered in this language that they can read/understand.


5

There is no big SEO advantage using either top level domains, sub-domains, or sub-directories. This is well covered in the question: How should I structure my URLs for both SEO and localization? The biggest differences are going to be: Top level domains and sub-domains allow you to move the hosting near the users by getting servers that are in the ...


4

There isn't any cross-browser compatibility issues AFAIK. But it makes the most sense and is most commonly used by putting it in html since your document isn't just limited to body. See this page for the purpose of lang and this page for the proper use of lang versus other ways of specifying language. Since lang only specifies the language of the current ...


4

The W3C provides this very long guide on choosing language tags/subtags. The important bits: Language tag syntax is defined by the IETF's BCP 47. In the past it was necessary to consult lists of codes in various ISO standards to find the right subtags, but now you only need to look in the IANA Language Subtag Registry. We will describe the new ...


4

Those are user agent language headers, not content language tags.


4

All data on a page should be in the same language to make language detection easier for search engines. On a page with <html lang="fr"> English keywords could actually be harmful because (at least) Google doesn’t use just the lang attribute to determine the real language. In practice … I wouldn’t waste time with keywords. I don’t know any relevant ...


4

Well, I don't know how to merge them into Google Analytics, but I can answer the first question. de or de_de are (obsiously) the same. They are Language tags. de is a Language subtag de-de is a Region subtag. A few examples of language tags: fr: French language, en-AU: English language, as written and spoken in Australia, az-Latn-IR, Azeri language, ...


4

The idea of the rel="alternate" hreflang="xx-XX", as I understand it, is ultimately to stop duplicate (or near duplicate) content that is intended for discrete regions from competing with itself or being actively penalised as duplicate content. So the specification of alternates won't stop them from showing in search in regions that aren't targeted (or ...


4

I ended up emailing Google. MY LETTER If my website is written in English, but I allow my visitors to temporarily translate the page using the Google Translate tool, do I need to remove unsupported adsense languages from the Google Translate tool? Since the translation is a temporary one I assume that the language is primarily in English and thus not in ...


3

An XML sitemap will show them where to find the alternative language pages. You can also put links in the footer of your pages linking to other languages. This is good usability as it allows people to easily find the language of their choice if they accidentally ended up on the page in a less-preferred language.


3

Does it make much of a difference if I code my site in HTML5 in terms of SEO [ use of < article >, < header > tags ] ? As of right now it makes no difference for SEO. Obviously that will change in the future. Can I do my site in 2 languages ? Does it hurt SEO ? No. Here is what Google recommends for multi lingual sites. I have heard SEO ...


3

To inform search engines of alternate language versions of a page, you should use the <link> element with the hreflang attribute, as described in the HTML spec. <LINK title="The manual in Dutch" rel="alternate" hreflang="nl" href="http://someplace.com/manual/dutch.html"> These links go in the head so are not visible to normal users. For users ...


3

There's no way to be 100% sure unless they tell you (and this site doesn't seem to do so). So send them an email and see what they say.


3

I don't think reinventing the wheel is the right path. There are a lot of standards currently on use. I think if you wanna markup your elements correctly, start from the basis: there is a global HTML attribute named lang for this purpose. <html lang='de-de'> <html lang='en-us'> ... for an element only <html lang='pt-br'> ... ...


3

What's the best way to determine users' preferred language? Ask - include a language selection dialog on every page and abide by the user's choice. The easiest way to to manage user preferences with this method is to host localized/internationalized content under distinct domains or URI's - e.g. "domain.com":"domain.kr" or ...


3

I'm not aware of anything explicit from Google that specifically advises translating URLs to local language, however they have acknowledged that keywords in URLs do help. You can see that Google (and Bing) is doing something with URL keywords by the way they're bolded in search results. That being established, it's a reasonable extension to say that ...


2

I would not use subdomains. In terms of SEO it's less helpful: http://www.hobo-web.co.uk/seo-blog/index.php/blog-subdomain-or-subfolder-which-is-best/. Similar talk here: Subdomain versus subdirectory. If you look at big sites, the most often use subdomains. It also depends if your business is more of a global or local nature. We are a copyrighting ...


2

You are abbreviating language names in English, not in that language. German speakers will be looking for an abbreviation of "Deutsch", not "German". Why not use the standard two-letter abbreviations for languages?


2

The question doesn't really make sense, functionally. The translation widget is triggered by the act of changing from the default selection("Select Language") to the target language. Making the widget come up with a different item selected wouldn't accomplish anything. In fact, people would probably have to change the selection to something else, wait for ...


2

The best practices are often the simplest practices (particularly when there are many different systems involved) - maintaining session data for every visitor and redirecting behind the scenes isn't very simple. For SEO: Search engines will automatically return results in the language which matches the user's language preferences and search terms, and users ...


2

Mydeco appear to use Python and the Django framework. To find out what technologies big commercial websites use, it's worth trying their jobs page to see what they ask for when hiring new recruits to their Web team. In this case, they had a position for a Senior Front End Web Developer in December 2008 that makes reference to Django. Their current position ...



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