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Yes and no. Yes: smaller files of course == faster download. But no: Unless your CSS is just completely out of control, it is likely smaller than the average image on your site. Plus, it will be cached after the first page load. If you're looking for a speed uptick, there are better ways to spend your time optimizing your site. In no particular order ...


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As one who has/had a rather large CSS file, I know that any style sheet can be reduced significantly. I am in the middle of reducing my style down to a minimum. But then again, my site is not too complicated really. It is often argued that CSS, even for an advanced site, does not have to be big. I assume the same can be done with JavaScript. (But please do ...


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The other option here would be to create an XML feed of the content on your main site. This is something I am exploring for a client. It of course does require integration into the remote sites, but as far as I'm aware this would not have a detrimental affect on SEO as its just syndication.


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The HTML tag <link> is not allowed in the <body>. Edit the index.php of the template to include the <link> and remove it from the code to be included in the article.


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I have no clue if this is going to work well, but neither have I if it's about AngularJS and SEO in general. There is very little evidence it works the way it is supposed to do. I would suggest leaving PhantomJS in the dark, it is known to have issues and is not very lightweight. Also considering you don't want to write/set up a backend I would use Firefox ...


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To my knowledge Googlebot reads javascript. Use the appropriate tags in every language version as described in https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/189077?hl=en <link rel="alternate" href="http://example.com/de" hreflang="de" /> <link rel="alternate" href="http://example.com/bg" hreflang="bg" /> <link rel="alternate" ...


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I am not sure what the consequences of all the options are, but I do know that the show/hide method works. This is because the text, if done right, can still be spidered by search engines and has not to date caused a penalty. You will see this technique on many sites that perform extremely well so I have to imagine this is the best option.


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Apart from the comments from Zistoloen and John Conde, the first thing to do is test yourself the situation. Replicate the situation and environment reported by the users to see if the problem happens to you. If you can't replicate completely the environment, at least try to do it as close as you can. Test the load of the site in many browsers, preferably ...


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Okay, I figured it out using PowerShell (feel free to add bash-powered info): The script to strip out unneeded code regions (and all conditional markup): [Regex]::Replace( [Regex]::Replace( (Get-Content $source -Raw), '(?sm)// #if ((!' + $condition + ')|(?!' + $condition + ')[A-Z]+).*?// #endif ((!' + $condition + ')|(?!' + $condition + ...


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It might already be too late to use this idea since the spammers already know about the form: leave out a critical piece of your form (like the action attribute) and populate it using javascript when the document is loaded. Do tell visitors that the form doesn't work if javascript is disabled and remove this message when the form is set up correctly.


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Generally the answer is still no. There are apps nowadays like PhantomJS that make it easier for an automated program to run a browser including JavaScript, however, they are typically slower. It's often much easier to scrape HTML and send direct POST requests. If a bot has problems on one site (e.g. a CAPTCHA) it will just move onto another. So if you ...


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CloudFlare describes Rocket Loader like this... Rocket Loader is a general-purpose asynchronous JavaScript loader coupled with a lightweight virtual browser which can safely run any JavaScript code after window.onload. Rocket Loader does a bunch of things: It ensures that all the scripts on your page will not block the content of your ...


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For the labels of the roads you don't have to set the color of the label, but only style the 'hue', 'saturation' and 'lightness'. For example: var styles = [ { "featureType": "road", "elementType": "labels.icon", "stylers": [ { "Hue": "#0a9ad7" }, { "saturation": 100 }, { "lightness" : -20 } ...



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