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9

You can't simply assign your router a static IP to get a static IP. Most broadband providers allow you to lease a static IP from them for an extra monthly fee. But you're probably better off spending that on a decent webhost, as it'll be cheaper, less hassle, and you'll have better uptime. Plus, most residential broadband connections have really poor ...


4

Bonded T1, DS1, SDSL (Symmetric DSL) Check with your Local Exchange Carrier to see what their offerings are. Business Cable 20-100Mbit down/3-5Mbit up It's usually against the TOS to use asymmetrical home use Internet Access like ASDL and Cable. Two of the main reasons are: a)while the downlink has blazing speed, the uplink speed (control traffic outbound) ...


3

Don't send auto-complain Europe and near it served by RIPE NCC - https://apps.db.ripe.net/search/query.html?form_type=simple&searchtext=IP On this page access to some additional whois-databases was added some time ago (America, Asia, Africa)


2

It looks like you can not do much at the moment. You could put up a message on the old server stating that the visitor is on the old website. If you would have more control over your website then you could configure a "proxy" to the new server. But for this you need your own server and some understanding about web server software. But something for the next ...


2

Look to use a Dynamic DNS (DDNS) service, such as Dyn. A DDNS provider allows for a static domain name for dynamic IPs. The service is pretty cheap for low traffic sites. The way DDNS works is that you set up your router to periodically update the DDNS service holding your domain name with the current IP. Using DDNS at the router level is more convenient ...


2

I also host a website on my local DHCP server. Even with a DHCP connection like I have my IP doesn't change if I lose power. The protocol works by checking my mac address and trying to give me my old IP back. Anytime the ISP is doing work though I typically lose my IP when my modem goes down. How I host the site is by using no-ip.com this tells them what my ...


2

While it's not a good idea to host a business site (much less a high traffic one) on a regular residential broadband (or even most business broadband) connections, it is possible in some places to get a residential T3/DS3 connection, which is about 43~45Mbps. However, the problem with trying to host business sites from home is the availability of such high ...


2

Do major ISP's (like Google) look at the IP address of incoming email or the domain, or both? Typically they look at the IP address of the mail server using DNSBL databases. These are based on DNS, which resolves IP addresses to domain names. Often spam can be spoofed from a fake email address and domain, and domains do change hands often, so blocking ...


1

My ISP optimum online blocks port 25 and port 80 for regular users. They claim lots of viruses and malware are spread on these ports. Spreading propaganda IMO since 99% of websites run on port 80. Well I upgraded to Boost which lets me use those ports. Here are two discussions on Mercury and ISP's blocking port 25 ...


1

Using the shortest path etc is regulated by routers used by the ISP. There isn't any way you can change the effects of this. Your traffic makes up a small fraction of the traffic going through these routers. These routers are already configured to get the traffic to the end point using the best means possible. If there was a way of you choosing your ...


1

Does ARIN require ISPs to specifically ask for certificate key pairs? There is no legitimate need for anyone else to have access to your private key if you are managing your own server - you have every right to be skeptical of this "requirement" and you can be certain that it is not an ARIN mandate (see ARIN Number Resource Policy Manual). Is this ...


1

Your ISP is probably caching requests to those sites (a little too aggressively, by the sounds of it). Unfortunately, you can't clear your ISP's cache in the same way that you can clear your browser cache, so there's little you can do about it beyond: Waiting for their cache to expire (usually around 24 hours). Changing your ISP. Connecting via a VPN, ...


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You could try a worldwide/global satellite ISP. Googling "global satellite isp" turned up a number of results, though you'd have to filter through them to figure out which ones were legit and which ones were shady (a lot of them had pretty sketchy websites, which is always a hit at shadiness IMHO).


1

First off, sites like 4shared/fileserve/mediafire are file hosting/file sharing sites. They're not "movie repository" sites. Most people use them for legal storage and sending files too large to be attached to an email. And filestube is just a search engine for file sharing sites. They don't host anything. Secondly, large websites of any kind generally use ...



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