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0

As @Simon_Hayer notes, there's no good way to prevent this entirely. However, if it's just a nameserver thing, you could create a new nameserver, ns.domaina.com (with the same IP address as ns1.myserver.com) and use that as domaina.com's nameserver. Again, this might not solve the main problem, but it will at least solve the "nameserver problem" you ...


2

Users, google and other major search engines are able to detect finger prints from a variety of methods. Simply adding a dedicated IP is not enough, especially if the IP is provided by the same IP block chain. To reduce the finger prints your site must use the following: a different name server, or use one that is used by hundreds to thousands of ...


4

The short answer is yes. Adding the domain name and IP to your HOSTS file will resolve the domain, locally, to the IP you have entered. When you then visit that domain in your web browser, along with your request to the web server (at that IP address you entered), your browser will send the domain name you have requested. The shared web server will then use ...


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Yes - altering a HOSTS file locally to redirect a domain to an IP isn't the same as simply typing in that IP into the browser. The reason why is that in shared hosting, one IP address houses multiple domains. When you type in that IP address of "your" site (which is also the IP of other sites as well), the server can either a) Give an error b/c it doesn't ...



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