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Actually setting the hreflang in the .com as you suggest - <link rel="alternate" hreflang="en-SA" href="company.com.sa/FAQ-page" /> is a way to go. Hreflang is setted on page by page basis, so if the FAQ is the only page in the .sa domain in English - you must set it as en-SA just for that page. The cleanest way is to set hreflang for the whole ...


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Duplicate content is no longer determined in a linear fashion. Today, duplicate content is determined using a semantic scoring method so that near duplicate content will still be seen as duplicate. This is because spammers would simply rearrange the content to avoid content as being flagged as duplicate. As well, n-gram phrase recognition is used to ...


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Which ever page is referenced as the canonical is the one that will show in SERP's. The other will likely not. If the content of the page is very similar or identical, yes it is duplicate content. The domain hosting the content is irrelevant. No, hreflang is used to specify pages where the content is the same, but in alternate languages. In your case both ...


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Just to make sure the google bots aren't gonna play a picky move, if you have a landing page, you might want to add a few more words to the page other than just the list of languages to choose from. Perhaps give a simple welcome message to the (insert website name here) in all the languages. At least then Google won't label the page as "thin content". ...


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Splash screens are acceptable according to Google. They do offer some best practices however, when using multi-language/multi-regional sites. In this article, Google recommends the use of the hreflang tag within <link rel="alternate" ... /> tag in the head. The specific excerpt from the article is below: For language/country selectors or ...


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Could you code in an event listener that pings for every keypress instead of the default space / enter key press? Google Search API and widgets usually have an auto-suggest option, which works the same as you want this to. However, I couldn't find an exact equivalent for the transliterate API, so your only option would be code this in yourself.


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Google created a feature for this exact problem, when you have very similar content but is meant for different regions: hreflang for language and regional URLs You mark up each page that has a version for different regions using special tags, either in the source code of the page, or in xml sitemaps. The tags state the language of the page and ...


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Whereas the answer by Andrew makes sense and is in line with the official response by Google, I see 3 types of errors in my website: A URL containing an URL-encoded URL is linked back using the properly encoded URL. E.g. http://example.com%3Flang%3Dzh is linked back as http://example.com?lang=zh - there is not much I can do if someone is linking my site ...



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