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1

Since I helped you with the htaccess file yesterday, I need to offer some advice here: Do not use Jaun's rule as a workaround. Leave both sites up, so the HTML based site stays indexed while you work on the WordPress Conversion. Sign Up for Google Webmaster Tools, and add both sites to your sitelist. Finish the WordPress Conversion, and remove the HTML ...


0

I would say it is pretty likely your site has an algorithmic 'penalty'. The content is non-original low quality and a typical panda target. If you posted the same question in the Google Webmaster Forum, then I am sure you would be told much the same. Some information on panda : ...


1

You need to do some SEO work on your site. Pages and blog posts need meaningful headers. Your h1 and h2 etc are important. Each pages header should be different. An example of a problem might be an events page with an 'events' header. The detail may be loaded in by an Id on the querystring. This is bad practice for SEO. Each event should have its own ...


2

Well, it is a case of "Only Google really know". My thoughts: Wordpress sites are going to generate several pages of duplicate content, eg tag pages, and so this type of page may be downgraded in the listings. Your pages are heavy in template, but sometimes only a small area of content changes (such as the title and what video is playing). As so little ...


1

I believe the problem is with your regular expression This sould work fine: RewriteEngine On RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f RewriteRule ^([^\.]+)$ $1.html [NC,L]


1

Since Dropbox blocks your images via their robots.txt, these will not be indexed. If you want them to be indexed, you need to move them to a 3rd party server not blocking them with a robots.txt. If you want some SEO benefits too, you need to store your images on your blog website. Makes sure your images have descriptive alt attributes to maximize chances of ...


2

Images not on your site will not be attributed to your site in Google image search. As well, if Dropbox restricts spidering the images with robots.txt, they will not show up in Google image search at all. There is no way out short of moving the images to your server which is what I recommend if you want them indexed by Google. I do not know what kind of ...


0

One reason for the decline could be that Google cannot find enough information about these pages in the surrounding text or in the alt attribute. The more specific and descriptive the text is, the easier Google can match these with queries. Another possible factor is that Google has detected that your pictures are not that interesting enough to users.


0

This is not an issue if you don't want Google to index these 450 pages. But you may get these warnings forever, or until you get control on the sitemap.


1

You are going to need a scripting language such as PHP to generate html pages from the content of the iframe. The content's html code will need to reside directly inside the shell pages when it is served to search engines. On the shell page, instead of displaying the iframe, the scripting language will generate html code for the shell page content area. ...


4

Sites can be picked up on alternates ports. As an example, search for https://www.google.co.uk/#q=:8080 You should see a result for Outgoing Port Tester on http://portquiz.net:8080 listed. A bit further down you'll also see GLCF: Earth Science Data Interface on http://glcfapp.glcf.umd.edu:8080/esdi/ too.


2

You could delete the sitemap and it would not mess up the current SEO. The purpose of a sitemap is to "tell Google about pages on your site we might not otherwise discover". They help fix indexing problems, but are not required for a site to be indexed. Google (et al) are not going to de-index pages because they are not listed in a sitemap. Realistically, ...


-1

The head tag is optional so nothing cares and it doesn't matter in most cases.


1

Does Googlebot care about valid HTML? In this YouTube Video, Matt Cutts says that the crawler is built to deal with HTML syntax errors. Google does not penalize you if you have invalid HTML. Google places more emphasis on quality content not HTML syntax. So I do not expect a faulty <head> tag to be the only reason for the site not being ...


1

It seems very likely that google will parse the site, like any browser they will try to ignore and work around many errors that their spider has to encounter on the many many sites that they spider. That's not to say that it won't depress your rank drastically, as such a broken problem probably will. As far as not being indexed at all, that certainly ...


2

Google will index anything it can regardless of what errors/issues it contains providing it doesn't explicitly instruct Googlebot not to crawl. With a missing <head> section, anything such as the page title, meta tags, stylesheets and javascript calls etc will all be missing - this will cause a lot of issues in terms of how the site performs in ...


0

Google does index sites with 'invalid' html. You can see if the pages are indexed by doing a site:search as it could be that the pages are indexed, but just not ranking very well.



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