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As of 2015, Googlebot is rendering pages including running JavaScript. It is then indexing all the content it sees: static and generated. To make sure that your JavaScript generated content is seen by Googlebot: Ensure that your CSS and JS files are not blocked by robots.txt Use the "Fetch and Render" feature of Fetch as Google in Google Webmaster ...


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robots.txt can block JavaScript files from Googlebot. http://www.robotstxt.org/ has more information about how to construct a robots.txt file. You could put your JavaScript that shows the password into an external JavaScript file (called showlists.js): $(document).ready(function(){ showLists(); }); Call that JavaScript file in the page head: ...


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I created a cloaking function in JavaScript: function isBot(){ return /bot|crawl|slurp|spider/i.test(navigator.userAgent) } Then I use that function to either show the passwords onload, or to show a message saying why no passwords were generated: if (isBot()){ $('#isbot').show(); } else { showLists(); } Now when I use the "Fetch and Render" ...


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Use canonical urls. So, if your "parent" page is http:\\www.example.com\page1.html, put this line in all your "children" page's <head> tag <link href="http:\\www.example.com\page1.html" rel="canonical"> How it works? It simply says to spiders "give all the credit of this web page content to this one I link". So, Google crawls the content and ...


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It is only supported by Google Search Appliance and is not officially documented by Google to be used for Google indexing so most likely will not work on Google. However, Quora seems to use Googleon/Googleoff on their site for the purpose you want to use it for.


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Use Structured Data markup to indicate the contentUrl of the image object. Here is an example using Microdata syntax: <div itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/ImageObject"> <a href="book.jpg" itemprop="contentUrl" itemprop="contentUrl" style="display:none;"></a> <img src="book_thumb.jpg" itemprop="thumbnailUrl"> ...


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Google indexes two primary types of online information for which you can submit sitemaps for: pages, and images Access google webmaster tools and verify your site with them, then create a sitemap with a list of URL's to your large and other images you want google to see. Follow the example at: https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/178636?hl=en ...


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There used to be the loresattribute – but that points to the opposite direction, I suppose. Afaik there is no corresponding hiresattribute. You could however digg into the html5 <picture> element / adaptive images, which could also be useful if you're working on a responsive layout: <picture alt="screen-image.jpg"> <source ...


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After trying different methods I came to the conclusion that you can never be really sure if a search engine respects robots.txt or no-index or anything the like. So if you really want to be sure your test site is not indexed, I's recommend using password protection through a .htaccess / .htpasswd file combi similar to the following code snippet: AuthType ...



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