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From the very beginning, Google primarily utilized three perspectives when using semantics and ranking: one, link text and value to the target page; two, the title tag of the target page; and three, the content itself. One of the interesting research results the project found was that performing a search against the title tag was about 2% more effective than ...


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No its not same. Google will count img01231 as <ALT> or <title> name for new image. Basically 301 redirect passes link juice not such things.


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Yes, although I'm not sure how to measure the negatives. Essentially you will lose out on SEO by not having the pictures on your site; image searches do drive traffic, although the amount can be very minimal. If you host the images, you also have control over their naming conventions, which you can utilize for them to perform well in image searches. ...


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Yes you can includes images from different domains (such as when using CDNs) if both domains are verified in your Search Console (formally Web-master tools) account, or you include an entry for the xml sitemap file in the other domains robots.txt. More info on Image sitemaps This is similar to including entries for URLs that reside on a different domain, ...


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Schema.org does not require any properties, so having a BlogPosting without an image property is totally fine. (And, other than omitting the property, there is no way to denote that you don’t have an image.) (I’d even guess that not providing an image would be the norm, as the image property is not for just any image that is contained in the blog post, but ...


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Yes, the file name matters, it affects SEO, and it will rank you. We have a top image bar preview thing position in a very huge search query simply because of the file name. There is no alt on it, and the Google image search preview lists no text. The image we used is a stock photo, so there are thousands of sites that also use it, but G prefers ours. It ...


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So I set up a test page here. Using Webmaster Tools' Fetch As Google feature, I saw that Google doesn't pick up the image declared in the img's srcset attribute: However, adding the JavaScript Polyfill Picturefill I was very surprised to see that Google now does pick up the image declared in the srcset attribute. This means Google is running the ...


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It would appear not, currently. I have numerous images on my site, including many with srcset, and it appears that only the image URL in the src attribute has been indexed by Google. I can't find any recent authoritative sources though.


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You could explore a few options that pop to mind - not sure which one would be best for you, but you're probably the best judge to decide that for yourself: As @closetnoc suggested, create JS links that Google might not follow. This isn't going to be a permanently reliable option as Google is getting really persistent with rendering and following JS ...


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The message... The following image(s) are missing width and/or height attributes. ...means that the image tag should have values assigned to width and height which then is used to construct a placeholder until the image is loaded. Your HTML code for your image is probably similar to this: To solve this HTML wise, use the following HTML code for your ...


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The browser requests this for performance. Say you have a paragraph of text with an image of 100x100 pixels in the top left corner. Browser builds the page, no image yet, so it builds it with just text The image now loads, and suddenly there's space needed Browser rebuilds the page, with the proper room for the image If you give width and height to the ...


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Adding the height and width attributes to your IMG SRC HTML tag allows the browser to know how much space to leave for an image. Without these values, the browser gives an image no space until the image is loaded, which means anything surrounding the image is adjusted after the image has loaded. http://www.computerhope.com/issues/ch001158.htm


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It's not exactly what you've wanted but you can try that way. You can put a meta code for facebook image, your logo for example. put this in your code and every time you will have your logo as an option. <meta property="og:image" content="http://example.com/logo.jpg"/>


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If it were me, I would use a script that invokes GD or imagemagick and create separate smaller thumbnails and keep them in their own directory. You can even have the identical file name if you want, but that might become a little confusing so better to name them something like image0001-thumb.png or whatever. I run a webhosting business and the most common ...



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