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You don't necessarily need to externally redirect. You could keep the (URL) filename the same and either internally rewrite to the actual .jpg file, or just make sure you send the correct Content-Type header. It is, after all, the mime-type that determines the file type, not the file extension (although this might be a bit confusing). Obviously if you ...


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Doing a 301 redirect, you should be fine. I would not try and redirect each image by name, but rather make sure that each new image has the same name, just another file extension. This should make redirecting a simple regex operation. Having said that, I suggest using http://www.smalleranimals.com/thumb.htm especially since you have 10k images. Here are ...


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With regards to the WebPageTest issue about the openh264 zip file, I honestly don't know but I suspect Alex Berry is probably right in his comment, though I couldn't confirm this with any information I was able to find about it. With regards to the PageSpeed Insights recommendation to use lossless compression, I suspect you will have to change file format ...


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There isn't really a special number of bytes for an image that's a standard, but you know you're in trouble if the image takes a while to download on a high-speed network connection. According to google, you want to serve compressed images. Nice thing with that idea is that the image size in bytes is substantially smaller than the original size yet the ...


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The answer is the same as it was back then: what does your userbase support? Back in the day almost everybody was on dial up so you need to keep page sizes to a minimum to allow your page to load in a reasonable timeframe. Then came broadband and that requirement eased up a lot. Nowadays it is not uncommon to have pages that are 500k in size after a;ll of ...


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In short, this means stripping out parts of the file that aren't required to display the image. For example, JPEG files may include EXIF data that contains information such as the make of camera used to take the photo. For PNGs it can also mean using different compression parameters that will yield better results for that specific file. Free tools such as ...


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Its a way to say compress your images. Easiest way is to use an art program and save the image at a quality lower than 100%. Usually 60% to 70% quality is acceptable to much of the world. Anything lower than 60% and you'll notice some blur in some spots of the image. If you use PHP, what you can do is load the image within it, and then output the image but ...



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