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I don't think css is going to help you for making the blurry ones clearer. Pretty much you have a lower resolution on the "blurry" images...anytime you blow it up, it will be blurry. Of course, since they are 100x100...you can indeed make the others that size as well to match (I think its too small though personally). Is there anyway you can just get a ...


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Google (and other bots) will see your html as it is. If you've got it as an image, they'll see it like that. If you Javascript it to the background, they won't notice, so it'll have no effect. Although, Google (and maybe other bots) are starting to understand javascript. I recommend not hiding the image, simple remove it or load it as background in the ...


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You can create sitemaps for images and upload it in Google Webmaster Tools. https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/178636


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This is normal for a lousy developer. No! This is not normal. It is one thing to use place holders as an example, but as the site is presented, the developer must not only be able to discuss the purpose and vision of any image, but be able to license it too. If, for example, I as a developer simply copy an image off the net and put it on your site, that is ...


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Google have never stated that websites that use the same layout, or using the same images as other sites have any effect on rankings. Think of all the sites that use the same layout, such as stack exchange sites, they seem to rank fine. Matt Cutts of Google also stated that using non-original images is not a factor in thier algorithm, you can see the ...


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Google will pick up on the same URLs and it will be processed in the algorithm. If you have several sites on the same server and the same image URLs Google will pick up on this and you will get penalized for this. you will find that you will be interlinking your websites and you will get links from each individual domain and with them all being on the same ...


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Google knows more about your images than you do. It scans images and builds a footprint, minor edits, resolution changes and renaming does not make the image unique therefor renaming the photos will do nothing for you. While Google appreciates unqine images it also understands that images often get reused dozens, hundreds and even thousands. Reusing an ...


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A pattern of similar structure and file names can indicate duplicate content and not just the text on a page. I would suspect this would especially apply to image based websites. Search engines take all factors into account. For example, registration information, sites on a single IP address or even within an IP address block, and so on. You may not get a ...


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I had the same issue and it is still not 100% perfect but with this approach I was able to increase the quality. I have to mention that we scaled the images with CSS (transform:scale(value)): Maybe this helps: filter: none; -webkit-filter: blur(0px); -moz-filter: blur(0px); -ms-filter: blur(0px); ...



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