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Use the same format for thumbnail. The absolute difference between a resized jpg and a resized png/gif is too little to matter anyway, even thoug the percentual difference may still seem big. You may need to account for numbers as well, though. How many such png/gif thumbnails are you going to display on a single page at any time? If there are tens or ...


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Solutions 1 and 3 are pretty much the same, with #1 taking an unnecessary step for a negligible saving on bandwidth - as the CSS resizing at #3 is fine enough. For really saving bandwidth, with the implied SEO benefit that the site would load much faster, go with solution #2.


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The efficiency of bandwidth seems to be factored into SEO though only the search engines will know the secret weighting they apply to it. If for example your website uses a lot of images that are downloaded at higher resolution than is required and then they are scaled down to a fixed size in the HTML/CSS this can receive an SEO penalty as they think you ...


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Though doing a site: search in Google images shows the images listed, it's not an easy way to find out if they are all indexed, as it doesn't have a total count and can infinite scroll for a long time if you have many images. However if you turn of java script in your browser then do a the same search, you will get an approx number of results shown and ...


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You can find out if Google is indexing your images by heading over to Google.com, searching for site:yourdomain.com then click the images tab. This will list what Google has decided to index. Please note, Google doesn't just index every image on the planet and it can take some time. Chances are if Google has indexed one lazy load image, it can then read ...


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I checked: http://1434513228829.7p3mxx16x2qhbybull8002elikymn2.volluto.com/robots.txt And it turns out that every URL attached to this domain is meant to be inaccessible by search engines and other respectful robots with the exception of robots.txt. Since Google completely respects rules in robots.txt, they will complain about blocked resources for all ...


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If the value is a URL, you must use link instead of meta. <link itemprop="image" href="/uploads/images/medium/product_img.jpg" />


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Your coding styles are perfectly valid but because you're going after responsive design, directly linking to the actual image files is a bad idea unless your images are smaller than the smallest screen for mobile devices because the users would have to flick their screen and/or zoom in/out to see the whole image. Unless there's a spectacular reason for your ...


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It's not considered bad coding style, in fact it's rather common to have the same link occurring at different places on the same page. Take for example, a forum; usually, in the top right you'll have a link to sign up, you'll then have another at the top of the comments section and then possibly one following each comment. Those are all linking to the same ...


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Schema.org neither requires nor recommends specific image dimensions. For an ImageObject, you may specify the image’s height and width with the height and width properties. Consumers of the data would have their own rules, if any at all. In case of Google Search tl;dr: For some Rich Snippets that use the image property, no dimensions are specified. For ...


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The Height should be at-least 120px And if the width is below 100px, then the ratio aspect must not be greater than 3.0. And images which are too small and no properly in square shape are not included in the +Snippet. Also images that do not pass these dimensions will not be included in the +snippet. This link would probably give you answers Check Here: ...



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