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According to Mozilla, there support for <noscript> on mobile browsers is good: Android - (Yes) Firefox Mobile (Gecko) - 1.0 (1.0) IE Mobile - (Yes) Opera Mobile - (Yes) Safari Mobile - (Yes) Mobile browsers that are implementing noscript to the standard should not download any images from within the tags when JavaScript is enabled.


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Serving multiple sized images is not a big SEO problem, but I try to stick to two sizes: thumbnail large That way, I can have smaller images in the pages, but get the large images ranked in image search. To optimize for image search you should: Use large images (at least 600px in the smaller direction, but not so large that they can't fit on the ...


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Responsive Design does not normally use any width or height attributes Google Development Tools is a guide and you shouldn't need to enforce everything you read on their site, in fact some of the stuff is outdated. The majority of responsive websites do not use width or height because they want the images to adapt to the screen size and by using fixed ...


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Browsers download data in parallel and try to start rendering the page as soon as possible. If you do not specify the size, the browser has no idea how large the image is going to be until after the image download is fully complete. This delay forces the browser to repaint or reflow the layout - delaying the page load time. The more images with this ...


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The process goes something like this: read .html file from .html file header, read .css, .js files (.js should be AFTER .css...) read img and script from the page Thus, image tags are read "late". However to calculate the formatting of your page, having the size of the image is a good thing (otherwise browsers use a "random" size such as 1x1, 25x25, ... ...


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Website compression The boilerplate your using uses nginx and ngx_http_gzip_module which will compress components of the website. It's pretty common to find most websites using gzip compression. Caching Your website is currently caching meaning that it will use a status of 304 Not Modified combined with an expire data. At present your website is using an ...


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Yes, there is a more practical way. Use relative paths everywhere. Instead of setting your image path to src='www.aaa.com/images/myimage.jpg', set it to src='/images/myimage.jpg' instead. Using relative path has no impact on SEO. It is neutral.


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Here are the sprites CSS of a site. They are useful to display little pictos (=icons) in a site. The main advantage is the browser only loads one big image with all the pictos (performance because of less requests to the server). And to display these pictos separately, you just move a cursor with a fixed size in this big image. Another advantage is also ...


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This is handled via HTML 5 SrcSet attribute which allows for one single image to have different sources. The problem is that browser support is still lagging, therefore you need to use polyfills or shims to get it to work correctly. As for your CMS, I would suggest having an Original, and then sizing the other images dynamically. If you are on ASP.net ...


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To my understanding, rel="canonical" is a page level attribute designed for HTML pages (and PDFs). The goal is help search engines identify the preferred URL for your content. You can find two good discussions: Google's Use canonical URLs Moz's Rel=Confused? Answers to Your Rel=Canonical Questions


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yes, but since these external images come from a 3rd part domain you need to make sure they are not blocking them via some method of cors or hotlink protection. also add dns prefetch meta for domains you will be pulling from.



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