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5

Using img.widgets.com for cookieless requests won't work if your main pages are hosted on widgets.com (as opposed to a subdomain, like www.widgets.com). This is because the domain scope of a cookie is a domain and all subdomains, and so if the cookie's domain is widgets.com (necessary to get the cookie sent to widgets.com) then the cookie will also get sent ...


5

I don't think there is an optimal time. I have never read anything about it. How about tracking the last open of a newsletter and deleting images after a month or so! I don't think anyone will be opening a newsletter after 1 or 2 months of sending it. I have a couple of newsletters and 2-3 weeks after sending is the maximum time I have seen a newsletter ...


4

Yes or no. Your assumption is correct and that more resources can be loaded in parallel by the browser if they are served from multiple domains. There are two cases to consider though: Your server is not presently serving at maximum capacity: In this case more requests being served simultaneously is better. Visitors who's download bandwidth is not already ...


4

If your system works as it is now, I don't think it will be a good idea to move on. Since you will need lots of migration, script update, etc .. From my point of view, the only reason you should store an image in DB (store only the path, not as binary) is to easily retrieve them. That's all. If you write your code depending on id as image filename, that's ...


3

You can sign up for a Flickr Pro account (not free otherwise you can only see the last 200 pictures) and tell people the email address that they've set up for you on this page: http://www.flickr.com/account/uploadbyemail/ You can use the subject line to give your photo or video a title and the body to add a description.


2

Also they can include them on SSL protected pages without them coming from a 3rd party site which is a trust issue.


2

This doesn't make any difference for image search at all. Either an image is relevant for the search term or it isn't. Where it is hosted doesn't matter. Image search is affected by other factors such as ALT text, text proximity, (if part of a hyper link) anchor text and/or keywords in the URL of the hyperlink, etc.


2

ImageMagick is free - I have used it to stamp 'preview' on pictures before, make dynamic fancy text out of people's names (it was wrapped around an orange in cloves, before you ask why I didn't just use @font-face) amongst other things. You install ImageMagick yourself and integrate it with your own service. A lot of platforms and CMSs provide plugins for ...


2

Tom, you stepped into a big, gigantic, outstanding, and pretty scary gray area. Random images used for descriptive purposes should all be correctly licensed. In practice even bloggers using wikimedia commons pictures (those should be free for all uses as long as they are correctly credited) hardly meet the copyright's holder requirements. (that is: they ...


2

Including images from one website on another is part of the way that the web works and there's not been much successful legal challenge about it. (http://www.bitlaw.com/internet/linking.html) Read that article for more info on what's not allowed (pretending comics are your own, pretending that your website is the official one for the product featured). ...


2

You could use Posterous and set up a Group, which does exactly what you describe. A group gives you a yourgroup@posterous.com address, and anyone can email photos to that address for it to appear on the group page. For example, in this blog post they create a collaborative photo album for a graduation ceremony. To get started, sign up on their homepage ...


2

Each time someone request anything all cookies matching domain are sent. This adds weight to every request in proportion to how much cookies your site uses. Since it seems your site relies heavily on cookies, you visitors should see a speed improvement if you serve images (and any static content, even css/js/etc) from a separate domain. Google uses ...


2

You will be hard pushed to find a site that does all that for free. However, imgur.com allows dead simple free image hosting with no discernible limits. There is a feature to group images into albums, but that is mainly for display on imgur itself and not your own organisation. Your other alternative is a CDN solution like Amazon S3/Cloudfront. Unless your ...


2

Short answer yes using a sub domain will enable parallel downloading that can will improve the amount of fetches sent and received at any one time, also you can setup the sub domain to be cookieless with good expires which will further emulate the use of a CDN. But bear in mind the following: CDN mirrors your files all over the globe and speeds up the ...


2

Images not on your site will not be attributed to your site in Google image search. As well, if Dropbox restricts spidering the images with robots.txt, they will not show up in Google image search at all. There is no way out short of moving the images to your server which is what I recommend if you want them indexed by Google. I do not know what kind of ...


2

Are you just trying to share a banner image? and have it hosted/served from somewhere? You can use windows skydrive, google drive, or dropbox. You can also put it up on a cheap godaddy instance or amazon aws and setup cname in dns settings so you can have an easy url to point to the image file.


1

Since Dropbox blocks your images via their robots.txt, these will not be indexed. If you want them to be indexed, you need to move them to a 3rd party server not blocking them with a robots.txt. If you want some SEO benefits too, you need to store your images on your blog website. Makes sure your images have descriptive alt attributes to maximize chances of ...


1

Does Google consider the URL of an image? How Google works with images Google Webmaster help Youtube channel


1

Because images are typically static they often don't strain resources the same way that dynamic pages do. Dynamic pages typically put strain on: The CPU The Database Images typically strain Number of simultaneous requests Disk IO Bandwidth It is likely that you can serve a fair number of image requests from your server without bogging it down. If ...


1

The host that is serving the image will consume resources every time that image is accessed, so for example: App.com has HTML page image.com has the images, every time that app.com is accessed resources are used on app.com to serve the HTML and image.com server will consume resources serving the images. So, yes CPU/RAM is used.


1

Google ranks images based on the source page and not the file location, so it shouldn't be a problem... if anything you may see a slight improve on page rankings due page speed being a factor.


1

There's no optimal time but maybe keep them for a year to be on the safe side. However, you have 2 other options: 1) Make sure your newsletters will look good and be readable even without the images. 2) Send your images inline inside the emails. The second option will make the email sending process heavier as it will have to attach the images inside the ...


1

The answer from StackOverflow: Do you really need to keep this file in the .cur format? Isn't converting it to, say, .png an option? I'm not even sure every browser/OS out there supports .cur (though I've seen examples online with this format, so I might be mistaken). Converting to a more standard format might ensure better portability, besides saving you ...


1

The reason the file is just downloading rather than processing correctly is that you need to setup the MIME list to support this. It's doubtful that this is possible on Google Code or Picassa and you will need to use a proper hosting account or a CDN that allows adding of custom MIME. You'd need to use the following MIME code image/vnd.microsoft.icon .cur ...


1

It is not normal for "anyone to use images like that" and I would strongly suspect that the stock photo sites either: have a special license option for high-traffic blogs that trades images for the plug and link; or those three sites have worked out a special deal with the respective stock photo houses and get free access to a limited number of images in ...


1

Completely viable, yes. A good idea... depends. I did something similar with imgur.com a while ago kind of testing the same thing. Technical issues I couldn't really find, like you said especially if you pay for a premium account. I just felt out of control with my content privacy wise. That said Photobucket does have a way of making your images ...


1

Plenty of people run their blog images off of Flickr, including slideshows. There are a couple of minor requirements, like the images linking back to Flickr, but if you want someone else to handle your media, especially if you're asking for free, you have to make some concessions. (In my experience, this isn't even always done and you'd probably have to be a ...


1

Have you asked your webhost to accept them? It could just be that by default their uploaders will not accept .cur (it isn't a file extension I would think to allow) but if you asked nicely they would place it on the server for you. The only other way I could think to do it is if you are able to rename files after upload to your host, then upload it as a ...


1

Imgur does: http://api.imgur.com/



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