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11

There are a few ways you can do this but if you have the URL Rewrite Module installed, it's fairly easy and a good way to do it. You can paste the below configuration into your site's web.config file. <rewrite> <rules> <rule name="https redirect"> <match url="(.*)" ignoreCase="false" /> ...


8

It is definitely System Log. Which Log file? Well -- you can check the physical path by right clicking on the System Log (e.g. Server Manager | Diagnostics | Event Viewer | Windows Logs). The default physical path is %SystemRoot%\System32\Winevt\Logs\System.evtx. You can create a Custom Filter and filter by "Source: WAS" to quickly see only entries ...


7

IIS7+ is actually pretty darn' fast. There isn't much you can do to speed up IIS; in general you'll optimize on the HTML, JS, Images, CSS, HTTP, HTTP headers, and possibly webapp code (C# etc). These issues are cross-platform. The user interface is of course different between Apache and IIS, but the knowledge is much the same. Steve Souders literally wrote ...


6

There's nothing explicitly wrong with it. It's just a domain. It's as cumbersome as you choose to make it. Some legitimate concerns, however, would revolve around the testing of security and certificates, etc. Since certificates are based on the TLD, it would be impossble to run tests against any web service that sits behind an SSL layer. Similarly, ...


5

From How to change the TCP port for IIS services Open Internet Information Services (IIS) Manager. Select the Web site that you wish to configure. In the Action pane, click Bindings. Click Add to add a new site binding, or click Edit to change an existing binding. Click OK to apply the changes.


5

In order for IIS to allow access to the file at all, it needs to be assigned a MIME-type. Use application/octet-stream and the browser will almost certainly treat it as a file it can't handle itself. (You could also experiment with application/x-whatever-you-want)


5

This won't work in an HTML page, so is it possible to configure IIS 7 to have the #include directive work in both HTML and PHP pages? Is there a better way to do this period? Something that might simplify things for you overall would be to configure IIS to use PHP code inside .html files instead of .php files. Then you'll be able to use PHP code ...


4

It's really very hard to suggest anything without more information, the nameserver thing is weird but not unheard of in the messy world of DNS. If I had to guess I'd say it's something local rather than your site. The most common cause I've seen for this kind of thing is the adblock plugin, cached DNS information or overactive antivirus/antimalware. I'd ...


4

There are a couple of ways this can be done. IIS7 introduced the integrated pipeline. Many IIS6 developed applications can handle running as is in the IIS7 integrated pipeline, but for the ones that can't there are a couple of options for what can be done. The easiest thing to do would be to switch the app pool the site or application is running to ...


3

This can be done with URL Rewrite module using "Reverse Proxy" kind of rule (when incoming request is handled/internally redirected to be processed by another back-end server), but for this you will also need an Application Request Routing to be installed. Unfortunately I have not dealt with AAR much and cannot really advise further. With Apache it is easier ...


3

There are lots of bots (computer programs) that visit webpages. However, they pretend to be real users by using the user agent of a popular browser, such as IE or firefox or chrome; instead of using their own specialized user agent so the server knows they aren't real people. As a result, the IIS logs count them as real users. Google Analytics doesn't, ...


3

This may be a problem if there is a server in between which is decompressing the content, such as a load-balancer, CDN, or proxy. If the content is sent encrypted on localhost, it will be sent encrypted to you unless there is a client in between which does not have the Accept-Encoding:gzip header in the request. The best way to check for compression is to ...


3

You haven't specified a web server however you appear to be involved in .net so I'm going to assume it's IIS In which case you can filter your logs using something like this http://learn.iis.net/page.aspx/692/advanced-logging-for-iis---log-filtering/ You can do the same on most servers You can't actually stop browsers requesting the image. However if you ...


3

If your environnement is identical, i mean with the same physical path, ip etc.. you can just applicationHost.config. The file is by default located in the C:\Windows\System32\inetsrv\config it's an xml file, si if you rigth a little tool you could change your binding before restore the file in your dev environnement


3

<configuration> <system.webServer> <httpRedirect enabled="true" exactDestination="true" httpResponseStatus="Found"> <add wildcard="*.php" destination="/default.htm" /> </httpRedirect> </system.webServer> </configuration>


3

From memory (I had to research this a few years ago) it has to do with what ISAPI extension is handling the redirect - what you want is something which is running in the same process space as IIS otherwise the redirection can actually slow or choke the webserver depending on the volume. I believe that the method you describe above is performing the rewrite ...


3

Windows Authentication will really only work if the IIS server is joined to the domain. That's the first thing you'll want to do (assuming you can). Once you do - WindowsAuthentication will make authentication a breeze. If joining the domain is out of the question, then you'll at best be able to use a mechanism based on forms authentication that could ...


3

At its root, this is almost certainly a database problem. The first thing to check is the indexes on the tables. If the full-text search is fast and the SELECT is slow, then there are most likely JOINS being performed that could benefit from indexes, possibly even composite indexes. You will need to profile the application (run a trace using SQL Profiler) ...


2

Have you tried setting the following? <system.webServer> <httpErrors existingResponse="PassThrough" /> </system.webServer> Here are a couple of references on error pages: http://www.iis.net/ConfigReference/system.webServer/httpErrors http://blogs.iis.net/ksingla/archive/2008/02/18/what-to-expect-from-iis7-custom-error-module.aspx


2

In answer to your question: 1 . My server has a distinct IP, can I use it although I have other sites there but they don't need ssl? There is really no mucking about when it comes to SSL, your site will need its own IP address for a single domain SSL. There are various hacks and bodges I've seen people do over the years, they all end in tears. 2 ...


2

I don't necessarily agree that a domain always has to be short. It depends a lot of how it is used. Let's say you're an agency having to show multiple projects to multiple customers, but not all these customers actually do have domains of their own, so something like supercooldemo.customer.com will not always be possible. So, you'll probably end up with ...


2

What you should look into whether or not there is an issue with the "byte range" HTTP requests feature of IIS7. Any issue with that would cause the byte_range_error_message error. For example, here's an IIS 7.5 hotfix for byte range requests that was causing problems with streaming PDFs: http://kb2.adobe.com/cps/807/cpsid_80780.html Since IIS7 typically ...


2

What is the request URI for the CSS file? Firefox will not cache the result when the URI contains a query string (i.e. a ? followed by parameters). According to the HTTP specifications, a browser should never cache a response from a request containing a query string unless the server explicitly allows it. Unfortunately though, Firefox and IE do not comply ...


2

All that you have done in that code is enable PHP on the server. You need to either rewrite or redirect your .html pages to the corresponding .php pages with the IIS URL Rewriter. Something like this might work for you. Put it in system.webServer. <rewrite> <rules> <rule name="REWRITE_TO_PHP"> <match ...


2

You can block favicon.ico requests from the browsers using the rewrite module for IIS. Basically you must install the module and activate it. Then you must create a rule in your web.config of your site or use the GUI on IIS Admin for creating it. You can get more info there: http://www.iis.net/download/urlrewrite ...


2

The applicationHost.config is not necessary in this case since you're going to setup a development server. I would copy over the configuration to your dev box. The easiest way to do this is to go into IIS on your production server, click on the root server and select Shared Configuration. Then click Export Configuration... and select a location. Then on ...


2

I found this can be done with URL ReWrite Credit to: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=ut0pD2l4z5c#! from web.config Be sure to add the ServerVariable you choose (HTTP_X_AdminIPAllowed in my example) to allowed server variables from the URL ReWrite module in the IIS Console. This example allows access to 192.168.1.* clients to ...



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