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16

Just because the site with Frames outranks the site without frames doesn't means that frames aren't harmful. The site with the frames may simply rank well despite the frames. The frames may be hurting them but thanks to quality incoming links and/or poor SEO on the other site they rank higher. Frames are still bad for accessibility and there is rarely, if ...


14

According to this article, The content in an iframe is not considered part of the parent page. Seems like that would be pretty bad for SEO purposes.


8

Some folks get a fair amount of traffic by allowing themselves to be framed by social network sharing sites like StumbleUpon - if your page is at all likely to be shared, I'd avoid doing this, and handle instances of framing in another way. Also, your site can already be sucked in and repurposed by benign services like Google Translate - and I believe an ...


7

Use a frame breaker script: <script type="javascript"> if(location.href!=top.location.href){ top.location.href=location.href } </script>


6

Cleaning a WordPress install, or any site, of such files is generally straightforward. If there's a pattern, do a search of the relevant files and then replace the bad code. In the case of WordPress, there are a few different sources of bad code (probably others): An already infected theme was installed Your site's FTP password was guessed and hacked ...


6

Xframe has never been implemented in any version of XHTML. It was proposed in a separate working draft by the XHTML2 working group while working on XHTML 2.0. The XHTML 2.0 working group itself was closed in 2010. The next version of XHTML is XHTML5, and is part of the spec being developed by the HTML5 working group. Xframes is not part of this spec. HTML5 ...


5

Search engines that recognize and crawl iframes, like Google, should treat this similarly to a backlink. Here's a report confirming this: Links In IFrames Pass Value In Google Whether iframe's have the same ranking benefits (i.e., 'juice') as regular backlinks depends on the attributes and tags used: iframes support Global Attributes, including title ...


5

You can't share cookies across domains. You may share across subdomains. So, if your domain wrote the cookie stored on the client - whether in an iframe from other site or stored by visiting your main site, your domain should be able to access it. Otherwise - no. Here's some good info on the matter (over on SO)...


4

Your current meta description is too long to fit into Google's search results pages. If this happens, instead of truncating the current description, Google often pull content from elsewhere on the page to create a description. This often results in unhelpful, incomplete or widely inaccurate description such as yours. The first thing you should do is ...


4

Since the search button is within the iframe's code located on the hepdata.com domain, you would need access to the source code on that site in order to add tracking code that you can use on your site, by setting the document.domain property or using cross-document messaging. If you don't have access to the code on that site, you might try positioning a ...


4

No need to use an <iframe> when a regular <frameset> will do. (This is untested as I haven't used frames in more then a decade). <HTML> <HEAD> <TITLE>A Basic Example of Frames</TITLE> </HEAD> <FRAMESET ROWS="1%, *"> <FRAME SRC="index.html"> <FRAME SRC="http://www.otherdomain.com"> ...


3

Paste the button JS only once at the bottom of the page and then load the HTML as many times as you want. Try to use static links for Facebook and Twitter like on this site if you do not wan't the share count. Use share tools like ShareThis and AddThis which have already optimized JavaScript. Using cache to increase PageSpeed and decrease load times is very ...


3

One of the best ways to prevent framing, is to use a rule on your .htaccess, like so <IfModule mod_headers.c> Header always append X-Frame-Options SAMEORIGIN </IfModule> This method doesn't rely on JavaScrpit being active or not but on the support of the X-Frame-Options header. It is not an Internet Standard, but it is quite well ...


3

You won't be able to manipulate the URL to get only a portion of the page. So what you'll want to do is grab the page contents via the server-side language of your choice and then parse the HTML. From there you can grab the specific DIV you are looking for and then print that out to your screen. You could also use to remove unwanted content. With PHP you ...


3

I think you mean you want to float the Iframe not align it. <style> iframe{float:left;} </style> As for using iFrames, it's discouraged and people using ad-blockers may not see your images. Most AD's use iframes to host their images and content so it's often ignored on websites when an adblocker is turned on. Cool trick though just between ...


3

I think there is a misunderstanding about frames affect SEO that I've heard from a lot of people. There is no inherent penalty for having iframes on your site, as there are several legitimate uses for them. There are iframes in GMail for example. but as tnorthcutt said, The content of an iframe isn't part of the parent page and isn't going to be indexed as ...


3

See if it helps: https://www.vbulletin.com/forum/showthread.php/18640-iframe-in-bbcode


3

You're mashing concepts together in your question. Even if the content of the iframe were indexed (I've seen a little evidence for this but can't definitively say one way or the other myself), it would–and should–not be considered part of the surrounding page and any ranking etc. for those portions would/should be assigned to the site the iframe comes from. ...


3

The noindex should be enough to stop it getting indexed. With regards to iframes and linking, I can't actually find any guidelines from Google. In fact, all they seem to officially say on the entire subject of iframes is "Google supports frames and iframes to the extent that it can." You would need to link to the article you mention for its context, but I ...


3

Why do you think showing your other site on your first site will help its rankings? There's nothing to gain by doing this for SEO. Not only is traffic not a ranking factor, but iframes are not SEO friendly so that content is invisible to the search engines anyway. So this is not useful and could possibly be seen as an attempt to manipulate the search ...


2

Google say of iframes: Google supports frames and iframes to the extent that it can. Frames can cause problems for search engines because they don't correspond to the conceptual model of the web. In this model, one page displays only one URL. Pages that use frames or iframes display several URLs (one for each frame) within a single page. Google tries to ...


2

When you use an iFrame you actually open a "window" of another domain. This is like browsing through different websites. If you add a resource (a font file for instance) on the page that hosts the iframes slider, you cannot manipulate the iframe slider (that is, the website inside) to use that font. (think of it - you can do iframe to any website in the ...


2

For some reason Google seems to be indexing the URLs of the iframes As covered here, Google will indeed try to crawl and associate framed content with the page containing the frames. Would rel="nofollow" work for iframes? Within the header section of the iframe page (not the parent page containing the iframe), use: <meta name="robots" ...


2

As far as I know, there is no way to have your HTML frame site get indexed the way you want. Google always indexes content at the URL of the child frame, not at the URL of the parent frame. Lack of search engine support is one of the reasons that frames are so rarely used on the web. It is far more common to rely on server side technology to build a ...


2

In HTML5, iframe comes as a replacement for frameset. iframe has been around since HTML 4. It was introduced at the same time as frameset. There isn't a replacement for frameset since framesets are just awful. Is this expected? Yes. If the server says that only pages from the same origin may frame a page, then it will appear blank if framed from a ...


2

Google means, it does its best to correctly recognize the content in iframes, while iframes are indeed violation against w3c, because iframes establish situation, where one url could get more then one head (one head of the site, and other head of the iframe src site). My strong recommendation, if you make use of iframe, do explicit control of the iframe ...


2

It is definitely not a good idea to use any kind of iframe in your webpage since they are hard and near to impossible to control their correct display to all users, especially the ones with smaller screens. Ofcourse the most important thing is that they are not working well when it comes to Responsive websites unless you use extra modifications to your ...


2

Solution for client: If the client want to get seo benefit out of this, then they can call this url from their backend and render it using a headless browser like prerender and include that as a html on page. So that crawler can see that content and index it. https://prerender.io/ Solution from you - the provider Other way around, you should add this ...


2

No, the NINDEX, NOFOLLOW on the embedded iframe will not effect the page it is displaying on. As they are neither on the actual page, nor within the <head> section of the pages source code. I know this from experience as I have used this technique before where I had content that must appear on the page, but was duplicate content, so I didn't want ...


2

This is due to the "Same Origin" security policy. The “Same Origin” policy limits the access of one window to another. The reason behind that is security. If you have blabla.com in one window and gmail.com in another one, then you’d not want a script from blabla.com to access or modify your mail or run actions in context of gmail on your ...



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