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14

Just because the site with Frames outranks the site without frames doesn't means that frames aren't harmful. The site with the frames may simply rank well despite the frames. The frames may be hurting them but thanks to quality incoming links and/or poor SEO on the other site they rank higher. Frames are still bad for accessibility and there is rarely, if ...


8

Some folks get a fair amount of traffic by allowing themselves to be framed by social network sharing sites like StumbleUpon - if your page is at all likely to be shared, I'd avoid doing this, and handle instances of framing in another way. Also, your site can already be sucked in and repurposed by benign services like Google Translate - and I believe an ...


6

Xframe has never been implemented in any version of XHTML. It was proposed in a separate working draft by the XHTML2 working group while working on XHTML 2.0. The XHTML 2.0 working group itself was closed in 2010. The next version of XHTML is XHTML5, and is part of the spec being developed by the HTML5 working group. Xframes is not part of this spec. HTML5 ...


6

Cleaning a WordPress install, or any site, of such files is generally straightforward. If there's a pattern, do a search of the relevant files and then replace the bad code. In the case of WordPress, there are a few different sources of bad code (probably others): An already infected theme was installed Your site's FTP password was guessed and hacked ...


4

No need to use an <iframe> when a regular <frameset> will do. (This is untested as I haven't used frames in more then a decade). <HTML> <HEAD> <TITLE>A Basic Example of Frames</TITLE> </HEAD> <FRAMESET ROWS="1%, *"> <FRAME SRC="index.html"> <FRAME SRC="http://www.otherdomain.com"> ...


4

You can't share cookies across domains. You may share across subdomains. So, if your domain wrote the cookie stored on the client - whether in an iframe from other site or stored by visiting your main site, your domain should be able to access it. Otherwise - no. Here's some good info on the matter (over on SO)...


4

Search engines that recognize and crawl iframes, like Google, should treat this similarly to a backlink. Here are two reports confirming this: Links In IFrames Pass Value In Google Does Google Crawl And Index Iframe/Javascript Widgets? Whether iframe's have the same ranking benefits (i.e., 'juice') as regular backlinks depends on the attributes and tags ...


3

You're mashing concepts together in your question. Even if the content of the iframe were indexed (I've seen a little evidence for this but can't definitively say one way or the other myself), it would–and should–not be considered part of the surrounding page and any ranking etc. for those portions would/should be assigned to the site the iframe comes from. ...


3

Paste the button JS only once at the bottom of the page and then load the HTML as many times as you want. Try to use static links for Facebook and Twitter like on this site if you do not wan't the share count. Use share tools like ShareThis and AddThis which have already optimized JavaScript. Using cache to increase PageSpeed and decrease load times is very ...


3

I think there is a misunderstanding about frames affect SEO that I've heard from a lot of people. There is no inherent penalty for having iframes on your site, as there are several legitimate uses for them. There are iframes in GMail for example. but as tnorthcutt said, The content of an iframe isn't part of the parent page and isn't going to be indexed as ...


3

I think you mean you want to float the Iframe not align it. <style> iframe{float:left;} </style> As for using iFrames, it's discouraged and people using ad-blockers may not see your images. Most AD's use iframes to host their images and content so it's often ignored on websites when an adblocker is turned on. Cool trick though just between ...


3

You won't be able to manipulate the URL to get only a portion of the page. So what you'll want to do is grab the page contents via the server-side language of your choice and then parse the HTML. From there you can grab the specific DIV you are looking for and then print that out to your screen. You could also use to remove unwanted content. With PHP you ...


3

Since the search button is within the iframe's code located on the hepdata.com domain, you would need access to the source code on that site in order to add tracking code that you can use on your site, by setting the document.domain property or using cross-document messaging. If you don't have access to the code on that site, you might try positioning a ...


2

Yes, you're allowed to run your own advertisements within your application on Facebook, but you have to follow their rules. There are too many to repost here -- you should just read their Developer Policy: http://developers.facebook.com/policy/ Specifically, the sections on Advertising and Advertising Guidelines: ...


2

One of the best ways to prevent framing, is to use a rule on your .htaccess, like so <IfModule mod_headers.c> Header always append X-Frame-Options SAMEORIGIN </IfModule> This method doesn't rely on JavaScrpit being active or not but on the support of the X-Frame-Options header. It is not an Internet Standard, but it is quite well ...


2

You would need to pass their account variable as a parameter to the iFrame. You could then grab it (via server side or JS) and throw it into the GA call. <iframe src="adhost.com/displayad.php?ga=UA-XXXXXXXX-X"> .. in displayad.php: var GAaccount = 'UA-XXXXXXXX-X'; // grabbed via server side or custom JS function <script ...


2

IFrames are sometimes used to display content on web pages. Content displayed via iFrames may not be indexed and available to appear in Google's search results. We recommend that you avoid the use of iFrames to display content. If you do include iFrames, make sure to provide additional text-based links to the content they display, so that ...


2

There are plenty of ways to do it, but why haven't you installed some sort of CMS on the website, when you're actually the one creating it? WordPress is awesome for blogging, and you should get it installed on the website instead of trying to get it embedded. Why would you want that anyway? It is usually a horrible solution. If you absolutely must, you can ...


2

It's a security feature of Chrome. Preferred solution: use relative paths, just as you do with <a> tags. Temporary pseudo-solution: run Chrome with --allow-file-access-from-files switch. It will make it work, but that's not a real solution, because the real cause of the problem is you using absolute local paths.


2

IFrames are completely ignored by search engines, then pets.tumblr.com/cats will look as a blank page. All content inside the IFrame belongs to a different site. Using IFrames will not hurt pets.tumblr.com but your pages will never get ranked because they will be blank pages. Doing javascript/jquery redirect might look as a sneaky redirect, you are sending ...


2

You could dynamically write the IFrame into the page using JavaScript. I see that you are already using JavaScript to resize the IFrame. If you were to do that, you could then use <noscript> tags in the page to include the full text of the bill (maybe with no formatting) in a way that search engine spiders would be able to see the words and users ...


2

This is because of the x-frame-options:SAMEORIGIN response header. If you analyse a HTTP response from YouTube you will see the following: As you can see there is a response header, 2nd from bottom, that sets x-frame-origin to SAMEORIGIN. This basically prevents you from framing content from YouTube in an iframe on your own site. The idea is to prevent ...


2

This is due to the "Same Origin" security policy. The “Same Origin” policy limits the access of one window to another. The reason behind that is security. If you have blabla.com in one window and gmail.com in another one, then you’d not want a script from blabla.com to access or modify your mail or run actions in context of gmail on your ...


1

it depends on how you call the modal box - if its an A href .../ link with an ID that is linked to javascrips/jquery, then (in one of my site's case) yes it will be indexed, BUT as its OWN page, ie the content page, not the parent / container. i got around that by letting google index the iframe content pages, and when a user clicks on the link from a ...


1

No, it will not affect your ranking but, from a search engine optimization point of view, the use of the iframe is problematic for several reasons. Mainly, whenever a search engine spiders the content that’s within an iframe, the search engine will normally link to the iframed page itself instead of the page it is housed within. This is not optimal for ...


1

Very hard to talk about rank since most Search Engine alghoritms are pretty much a secret for obvious reasons. But it seems iframes are not detrimental at least acording to this post: http://www.convonix.com/blog/search-engine-optimization/iframes-seo-friendly-crawlable-optimization-google/


1

You need two things setup. 1) Cross domain tracking - and according to the Google Analytics docs setDomainName is needed. 2) Correct linking to your iframe: _gaq.push(function() { var pageTracker = _gat._getTrackerByName(); var iframe = document.getElementById('myIFrame'); iframe.src = ...


1

Write a simple plugin to break out of the FeedReader frame. Sample code, not tested: <?php /* Plugin Name: FeedReader Frame Buster */ add_action( 'wp_head', 'wm_34968_feedreader_frame_buster' ); function wm_34968_feedreader_frame_buster() { ?> <script>if (document.referrer.indexOf('feedreader.com') && (self != top)) { ...


1

Google comment on it: http://support.google.com/webmasters/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=34445 Another interesting link from that page is http://searchenginewatch.com/article/2064573/Search-Engines-and-Frames (sorry, there is too much data on each to copy and paste other than the below summary) From Google: "Google supports frames and iframes to the ...



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