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The Common Name is typically composed of Host + Domain Name and will look like "www.yoursite.com" or "yoursite.com". SSL Server Certificates are specific to the Common Name that they have been issued to at the Host level. The Common Name must be the same as the Web address you will be accessing when connecting to a secure site. For example, a SSL Server ...


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Time for an update! It's not 100% resolved, however having updated the sitemap and robots.txt to ensure that all were pointing to HTTPS, traffic is now at about 85% of what it was. It seems to be gradually climbing again, and one explanation for lower traffic/searches is due to seasonal demand. So I think for now the issue is resolved, though I'm ...


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You can purhase certificate which has multiple Subject Alternate Names listed, that is, the domain can be valid for client.gadgets.com and client.widgets.com. However, every time you get a new client, you have to purchase a new certificate that has this additional SAN in it.


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These are no resources which get usually accessed by the browser but simply a fancy way to declare a name space, i.e. all SVG images share the same XML name space which is defined by the URL and same with xlink. This means you should treat any of these xmlns just as some kind of special string and leave them unchanged.


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The security certificate states that certificate issuer verified the identity of the website operator. A certificate should only be issued when the identity has been verified and control over the domain name can be demonstrated. A certificate authority may have different levels of entity verification such as: Personal verification for an individual -- ...


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Well, remember that a certificate certifies something: The CA signs that "somebody came to me with the public part of a private/public key pair, and I have verified that this person controls (domain), so it is safe to use that private/public key pair for encrypted communication with (domain)". For various reasons, you can have multiple servers handling ...


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So you support all the bleeding edge encryption, got an A+ on Qualys, that is awesome. But did ya'll check your analytics for XP users, specifically using IE or Chrome? Its no secret that XP is a dog that dies slow when connecting to modernized sites. Its also no secret that IE and Chrome on XP (or even old version of android browser) are very much limited ...


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I could imagine (by a far stretch here) that the "bots and spammers" people don├čt like https because it drains more resources on there end (too) so they just crawl and visis http.


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I changed three of my websites from http to https and all of them entirely different niche aswell. Take for example Pakistan broadband forum which I changed from http to https and did everything by the book. 301 redirects and google webmaster tools site change and even all the internal links that were posted using http in the url were changed to https over ...


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You may want to test if your webserver is configured properly to serve HTTPS. If not configured correctly, it is possible that the browsers are throwing a warning page to the users and the users are choosing not to visit your site. Tools such as this one from Qualys SSL Labs can tell you if there is an issue. Aim for an A rating


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This is easy to do, and the only piece of the puzzle missing is an SSL cert for olddomain.com. Forget the idea about IP addresses restricting you, this misunderstanding is the root cause of your issue. 'Domain Validated' (or DV) certificates are very inexpensive and available from multiple vendors for well under $10 USD. I have used cheapsslsecurity.com and ...


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While it isn't impossible to host multiple secure sites on a single IP address, thanks to SNI and SAN, the redirect you're trying to do is impossible without one of the aforementioned solutions. In order to receive a redirect from https://www.olddomain.com, the browser must have already requested that URL using SSL/TLS, and is expecting an encrypted response ...


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HTTPS does not improve traffic in any way, shape or form. It's a secure protocol and nothing else. No different, otherwise, from HTTP. If you want Google to combine the results for both http and https, you have to do that in webmaster tools AND, better, redirect your http traffic to https. Then your totals will be added together instead of separately ...


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HTTPS doesn't send the referrer header. Such traffic will therefore be lumped in with 'direct' traffic.


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I've supported HTTPS on my websites for about two years now, but I'm just starting to experiment with the HTTPS versions in search engines. For my sites, I have always had the HTTP version as the canonical (using link rel canonical tags) but allowed users to navigate to either HTTP or HTTPS. On March 18th, I switched that for one of my sites. I made ...


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%{HTTP_HOST} will refer to whatever host the site was accessed through. ie. example.com or www.example.com. To always redirect to www.example.com then simply put this in the substitution: RewriteCond %{HTTPS} off RewriteRule .* https://www.example.com%{REQUEST_URI} [R=301,L] But unless you had a similar rule before then both example.com and ...


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If the payments are totally handled by paypal then they are taking care of this for you. See this info on PCI DSS compliance https://www.paypal.com/uk/webapps/mpp/pci However if you are additionally taking and storing customer details you have additional obligations under the data protection act. Here is a good roundup... ...


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You can add a single-domain certificate to as many servers as you wish. Wildcard certificates are only if you want to use multiple subdomains (hosts) on a domain. The geographic location of the servers does not matter.



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