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From What are the most commonly used and basic Apache htaccess redirects? contributed by bybe: Catch all and redirect non-www to www You should opt to use mod_write for redirecting all requests for non www versions of your site because the $1 varible will catch page names, so example.com/page1/ will automaticly redirect to www.example.com/page1/. ...


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Not all servers use httpd.conf, but all have some type of configuration file. If you're using apache, the httpd.conf configurations can be overriden through .htaccess file in the root web directory unless overrides are turned off in httpd.conf See: http://httpd.apache.org/docs/2.2/howto/htaccess.html


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There is no 'proper' location for any config file on a unix system. It can be anywhere the system admin wants to put it. There are conventions - like putting the base config file in /etc/ - but they are just that: conventions. It may make sense in some web hosting environments to cather all the config files in each user's folder, or one common folder for ...


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There is no way to change the port numbers for cPanel, the WebHost Manager or Webmail. The port numbers are hard-coded into cPanel and there is no configuration option that allows them to be changed. Even if you edit the httpd.conf file and change the ScriptAlias directives that cause /cpanel, /webmail and /whm to work, they will still be accessible via ...


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For 20 links, you are not going to notice a speed difference with any of those methods. None of them are going to add significant overhead. There is significant overhead added by PHP and WordPress to run your site. The redirects are not going to impact performance at all. For a very large quantity of redirects (thousands), individual rewrite rules ...


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the example you provide should and does work (tested on 2.2). so I guess the problem will be somewhere else. your env may be getting an another value somewhere else? (note the regexp will not match plain 'sorryspammer.com' - you need something like ^(.*\.)?sorryspammer\.com$ note2: you could use .*sorryspammer, but that is bad practice, since it matches ...


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httpd.conf is available only if you have Apache as the web server. Nginx and LiteSpeed have their own configuration files and names. On cPanel servers it is under the /usr directory, whereas on plain servers with Linux distros, it is under the /etc directory.



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