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Not all servers use httpd.conf, but all have some type of configuration file. If you're using apache, the httpd.conf configurations can be overriden through .htaccess file in the root web directory unless overrides are turned off in httpd.conf See: http://httpd.apache.org/docs/2.2/howto/htaccess.html


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the example you provide should and does work (tested on 2.2). so I guess the problem will be somewhere else. your env may be getting an another value somewhere else? (note the regexp will not match plain 'sorryspammer.com' - you need something like ^(.*\.)?sorryspammer\.com$ note2: you could use .*sorryspammer, but that is bad practice, since it matches ...


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httpd.conf is available only if you have Apache as the web server. Nginx and LiteSpeed have their own configuration files and names. On cPanel servers it is under the /usr directory, whereas on plain servers with Linux distros, it is under the /etc directory.


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There is no 'proper' location for any config file on a unix system. It can be anywhere the system admin wants to put it. There are conventions - like putting the base config file in /etc/ - but they are just that: conventions. It may make sense in some web hosting environments to cather all the config files in each user's folder, or one common folder for ...


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There is no way to change the port numbers for cPanel, the WebHost Manager or Webmail. The port numbers are hard-coded into cPanel and there is no configuration option that allows them to be changed. Even if you edit the httpd.conf file and change the ScriptAlias directives that cause /cpanel, /webmail and /whm to work, they will still be accessible via ...


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Apache applies configurations for directories to a request from smallest to largest. In essence the <Directory /> section specifies virtual host defaults; since every other possible directory will have that portion in its path. If multiple (non-regular expression) sections match the directory (or one of its parents) containing a document, then ...


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I would strongly recommend for the second one that has special characters that you use the <LocationMatch> Directive. The <LocationMatch> directive limits the scope of the enclosed directives by URL, in an identical manner to <Location>. However, it takes a regular expression as an argument instead of a simple string. ...


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After doing the above, you can also change the: in the of wamp directory (wampmanager.ini, wampmanager.conf). php.ini my.ini Save your changes and close Wampserver.



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