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1

It’s similar to using the meta element for Microdata (in fact, the only difference between meta and link is that link must be used if the value is a URI, meta in every other case): Use link if you can’t provide a visible hyperlink/image/video/etc. A typical (but not the only) reason for using link is in cases where the URL is not supposed to be visited by ...


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For the Microdata, it does not matter if you use div, span or li. Using this is invalid, of course (span can’t have the attributes a and href): <span a href="http://www.example.com/" itemprop="url"></span> If you want to provide a URL without having a clickable/visible link, use the link element (which can be used in the body if used for ...


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You are over thinking this. Search engines use semantics more for weighting these days. While the old parser models still make sense, semantics plays a much larger role. Here are some answers that will provide some background before I answer your question more directly. This answer explains how content is weighted: Why would a website with keyword stuffing ...


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This answer hugely depends on what you are expecting as an answer. Google has not, and will not, reveal exactly how much weight each element is worth, nor am I aware of any case study that has proven SVG as in-viable. This answer is based on what we know and not what we hope Google loves responsive design :: SVG scales to any resolution :: GREAT! Google ...


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Yes, itemref can do this, but it has to be used on the element to which the properties should be added to. So instead of this <div id="main-product" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Product"> </div> <div itemref="main-product" itemprop="isRelatedTo" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Product"> </div> you have to use this ...


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The duration property expects a Duration as value, which has to be in the ISO 8601 duration format. The time element can have a "valid duration string" as value (which is based on one of the ISO 8601 formats). Your value "PT4M5S" would be valid. So you should use <time itemprop="duration" datetime="PT4M5S">4:05</time> Microdata parsers have ...


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In HTML5+Microdata, only the meta element can have the content attribute. (In HTML5+RDFa, every element may have the content attribute.) So if you want to add the string value "in_stock", and it should not be visible on the page, using the meta element is the correct choice: <meta itemprop="availability" content="in_stock" /> You were probably ...


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Using structured data (e.g., via Microdata or RDFa) is not a direct ranking factor, but it can lead to more traffic (for example, because of Rich Snippets in the SERPs). However, if you already are using Microdata (probably with the Schema.org vocabulary), and you would now add RDFa, this would only benefit those consumers that only understand RDFa but not ...


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Yes, you may use any HTML5 element for Microdata. Bute note that some elements come with special rules: elements with href/src attribute (e.g., a, link, img, etc.) create a URI as value the time element creates a datetime as value All other elements create a string as value. This is usually the element’s content, but in some cases it’s the value of an ...


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If the value is a URL, you must use link instead of meta. <link itemprop="image" href="/uploads/images/medium/product_img.jpg" />


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Using meta (and link) elements for Microdata is fine. Sometimes there is even no sensible alternative to it, e.g., if specific codes have to be provided where it would make no sense to show them to your users. Google even uses meta in some of their Rich Snippets examples: Products and Software Apps: <meta itemprop="priceCurrency" content="USD" /> ...



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