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It is perfectly valid for the alt attribute to be blank, if the images are purely decorational. Otherwise, if you are outputting the same image over and over then it makes sense that the alt attribute be the same for all of them. There is no negative SEO benefit to that, and your cross/tick images are unlikely to rank in image searches anyway. One ...


5

There is nothing wrong with having duplicate alt tags as its job is to describe the images for screen readers and users who have images disabled. So if you have the images on the page many times then it is likely you will have duplicate alt tags - it is semantically correct. Saying all that you could however describe your images differently for each one ...


5

You can remove the image from the td and just add it to the td instead. In your example you don't actually need the image, it has no content value, or SEO value. Because of that, you can do this: <td class="center Crossed" title="Cross"></td> .Cross{ background: url('/images/cross.png') no-repeat center center; height: 15px; } This has ...


1

I heard the first, but not the second. This is advice. There are no rules regarding H1 tags. Search engines cannot dictate how to use HTML. Use as many as you want however you want. However, the advice to use just one H1 tag is generally a good one and fits convention. It is strong SEO advice. In addition, the H1 tag should strongly support the title which ...


1

Although their documentation doesn't say so, using the rel attribute is supported by Google, so both should work. The 'in-URL' ?rel= syntax exists for blog users, who may not have access to edit the page's HTML tags, but the HTML5 separate attribute version is more 'correct' so I'd recommend: <a href="[profile_url]" rel="author">Author</a>



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