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Title is common to all elements: http://www.w3.org/TR/html-markup/global-attributes.html#global-attributes However, it is worth paying notice of the warning on this page: http://www.w3.org/html/wg/drafts/html/master/dom.html#the-title-attribute Relying on the title attribute for the visual display of text content is currently discouraged as many user ...


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The title attribute is available to all HTML tags: HTML defines a few attributes that are common to all HTML elements. These attributes can be used on all elements, though the attributes may have no effect on some elements. So you can safely put it on any element you want. But it is up to the browser to determine if it will do anything with that ...


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For SEO, there is a cascading effect from external inbound links, through the title tag, h1 tag, and description tag and so on. While you do not always have control over the inbound links, you have control over on-page optimization so here goes: Your title tag should be a short and unique title of each page. It should be succinct and optimally limited to ...


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My questions is, what should I do with the site name and slogan? Is the <h1> appropriate, then use another <h1> tag for each page title or should I continue using the styled <p> tag? Or should I convert this into an image and use that for the site name/slogan? From an SEO perspective, it is a bit better to use <h1> and <h2>, ...


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There is no hard and fast rule as to how to do it. However, I would like to answer this question in relation to what webmasters.stackexchange.com do with relation to its page design. They put the site name (no slogan) and logo in an image and wrapped it in an <a> tag with a link to the home page. The questions (apparently an important component of ...


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This issue is rather common and found in mostly poorly edited or made WordPress themes. entry-title, updated and author are all related to the Hatom markup which requires hentry to included above the fold and ideally in the body. It's likely that your website is missing author, updated and entry-title leaving hentry still within your code. View source and ...


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There is no benefit in using the hreflang on a single language website, it is meant exclusively for multilingual and international websites. I am not suggesting that Google (or other search engines) would penalize you for it, but they would definitely not reward you. You can see a proper implementation of the hreflang tag over at trip advisor - a well ...


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Don't use like you have used it. Use it in <html> tag. Like following example: <html dir="ltr" lang="en">....</html> It is not necessary to put this attribute to your page as it just tells Google the language of page. It is not necessary because Google itself detects the language and it is very good in detecting any language. It is not ...


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Each W3C standard offers stable URIs for different maturity levels and versions. The HTML5 specification has an URI which always points to the most recent version: http://www.w3.org/TR/html5/ Currently, it’s a "Last Call Working Draft", and this version has the URI: http://www.w3.org/TR/2014/WD-html5-20140617/ You can link to each element and attribute ...


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I prefer to use the lang attribute of the <html> tag to declare the language for the current web page: <html lang="en" dir="ltr"> However, even that doesn't have any effect on SEO. Google doesn't trust any meta information (lang=, hreflang=, or anything else) provided with a page to determine what language it is in. It detects the language ...


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There are no tangible benefits from using the hreflang attribute, beyond special usage like the one described by Google. It is declarative markup and does not cause any action or affect rendering, unless you make it to. The HTML5 LC explicitly warns: “It is purely advisory. [...] User agents must not consider this attribute authoritative — upon fetching the ...



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