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I don't have a link but read an article within the last few months, possibly Matt Cutts but definitely from Google, who said Google still does not consider the new HTML5 elements when analyzing content. So using <nav> makes no difference but a link is a link, a heading <hx> is a heading, and text is text and carry far more weight than anything ...


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The current HTML ("HTML5") standard includes a <main> element for this purpose. Using separate header / footer / nav / main elements help you indicate the main page content; something like: You should also find the relevant Microdata/Schema.org schema for your page content. A Product for example would use itemprop="name" to identify what the product ...


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Nothing special to do here, the code is your content. You mark up your code with appropriate elements, and consumers (like search engines) then can do whatever they want to do with this information. A code search engine might be especially interested in it, other search engines might ignore it, most will probably don’t care and handle it in the same way like ...


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I described the different ways how mainEntityOfPage can be specified in an answer on Stack Overflow. The difference between your two examples is that the second one creates an item (with the type WebPage), while the first one just points to another page (which might or might not define a type). From the perspective of Schema.org, both ways are fine. The ...


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Yes, as its definition says "Indicates a page […]". If it were intended only for the current page, there would have been no point in expecting a URL as value, as a Boolean value would have sufficed. In your example, it’s probably not necessary to define mainEntity and mainEntityOfPage for the Article (assuming that the markup is on the page http://...


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It depends on how you're actually importing the code and the contents of it. If the code contains actual text valuable to search engine crawlers, then chances are, it might be bad for SEO because some search engine robots might not understand the new import tags. If the target audience are people with older web browsers, then importing might not even work ...


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You could always check what your site looks like to googlebot: https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/6066468?rd=2 and to be sure look at the access logs of your server. There doesn't seem to be any information on the engine used w/i googlebot but if it's Chrome 36+ it will work. Alternatively, you could use webcompontent.js Polyfills at http://...



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