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117

If ( your site does not make money ){ do what makes you happy } else if ( the cost of supporting IE6 > the money you make from IE6 users ) { stop supporting IE6 } else { keep making money from IE6 users }


39

I agree that your decision obviously should reflect the business realities and audience of your particular website. That said, large companies officially dropping support for IE6 is still significant. It raises the general perception that it is finally OK to leave a 10 year old browser behind. It also adds ammunition to any case you wish to make to the ...


32

HTML5 is huge, but also awesome. In my view, it is mostly about interoperability. The spec goes and specifies even edge cases to try and make sure that all browsers read the markup the same way. In second place, HTML5 has video and audio, which do exactly what the name says it does. If you want to include video or audio, HTML5 should reduce your plugin ...


18

To keep track of features and specifications support you can check When can I use. It includes HTML5 and CSS3 features and things like SVG, PNG, CSS2.1 and CSS2. It also tracks their status of approval (Recommendation, Proposed Recommendation, Candidate Recommendation, Working Draft, IETF standard). FindMeByIP maintains matrices of supported CSS3 features ...


17

Give HTML5 some time to mature and gain wide acceptance and you might have some specific guidelines for SEO, but I don't think it will differ much from what's currently considered good practice. Either way, I think it's a little too early. In general, if it's good for your users, it will be good for SEO. Make your site accessible and usable. Use a good ...


14

I really enjoyed reading Dive into HTML 5 (an online, free book).


14

90% or more of Americans have images on, JavaScript enabled, CSS support, and a reasonable connection. Spending 90% of your time chasing the 10% of the world that has gone out of their way to not experience the modern web is a waste of time.


13

I think this has to be dictated by metrics. If a significant number / percentage of visitors is using older browsers, you should support your visitors. What is "significant" depends on the client. ;-)


13

According to Matt Cutts, Google doesn't penalize sites just for having multiple <h1> tags. It's possible that their indexers may be programmed to detect egregious overuse of <h1> — like, say, having all your text inside <h1> tags — and to penalize such pages, but I've seen no direct confirmation of that. It is very likely that ...


12

Probably. There are parts of HTML5 that you can use right now, today. Forms for example. If you have <input type="email"> in a browser that doesn't support HTML5 (yes, even IE6) you will simply see the same thing you'd see if you used <input type="text">. Yet on a browser that supports HTML5 form elements, you gain the advantages of the email ...


12

HTML5 is supported by all browsers now, even IE5!(if you use the html5shiv script). I highly recommend reading http://diveintohtml5.org It is one of the best HTML5 resources out there. As for CSS3, if you do use it, make sure to use vendor predix too, on top of the regular syntax. e.g. border-radius -moz-border-radius -webkit-border-radius I believe in ...


12

The three big search engines, Google, Bing and Yahoo (and more recently, Yandex), have agreed to understand 1 single microdata vocabulary. This is Schema.org, which has examples of placement. This formats your results as Rich Snippets, the search engine results which have pictures and fivestar ratings, etc, displayed on the search result page. While this ...


12

Assume: JavaScript will be turned off CSS3 will not be supported Images will be disabled The users connection will be slow I know that's not what you want to hear but as web designers and developers this is the reality we face. Not only will there be users using older browsers but some of them will alter the settings on their browser to change its ...


12

Add Google Analytics to your site and track your users The only way to find out is to collect a reasonable sample of statistics about your user base. Anything short of that is just a baseless assumption. Fortunately, Google Analytics tracks absolutely everything about the browser, screen size, enabled capabilities, etc... Target Internet Explorer as the ...


10

It depends on your timescales. Right now Flash is far more widespread than HTML5, mainly due to browser support (like it or not, until IE9 is released and widely adopted, this will remain the case). However, I think over time HTML5/Canvas will become the dominant technology — at least for things like video, animations and simple interactivity. I suspect ...


10

It is perfectly valid for the alt attribute to be blank, if the images are purely decorational. Otherwise, if you are outputting the same image over and over then it makes sense that the alt attribute be the same for all of them. There is no negative SEO benefit to that, and your cross/tick images are unlikely to rank in image searches anyway. One ...


9

Probably not, try this tool http://robot.dabase.com/ to see what a robot typically sees on your site.


9

To speculate (because I think that's all you can do on this question without rigorous testing in an essentially uncontrollable environment) I personally doubt that there are yet ANY ranking factors associated with HTML5, for the same reason that Google doesn't assign quality points for valid HTML. There aren't enough sites using these structured elements ...


8

According to the HTML5 spec, "nav" is a "section" and a section "is content that defines the scope of headings and footers." The W3C example for the nav section shows h tags in the the nav. http://www.w3.org/TR/html5/sections.html#the-nav-element


8

To answer your question: yes, your current DTD is fine. But it's also the wrong question. Standards don't work like this. It's not about making sure you're always using the latest one, and they don't really "expire" in the way that your question seems to suggest. They're about picking one and following its rules. Even if your site were using HTML 4 and ...


8

Google doesn't favour HTML5 over HTML4 per se. However, HTML5 does allow more semantic mark-up, which will make it easier for Google to figure out what's what on any given page. This allows Google to be more precise when it comes to ranking what is and what isn't important on a page. For example, the nav element indicates very clearly to Google (or any ...


8

The problem you have is out of your control since this is how the hosting is setup at Github on the path that you have mentioned, Extension type is not only the factor when it comes to executing files since the web hosting can over-rule how a browser renders a file. You could have a .zip file rendering as a .html file if the host was setup to do so, you can ...


8

Rawgithub.com allows users to take the "Raw" versions of a Git and turn it into a URL usable in <script> tags. It's quite easy to use, simply remove the first . from the raw URL. For example, this: https://raw.github.com/joelambert/CSS-Animation-Store/master/cssanimationstore.js would turn into this ...


8

First of all, use better alt attributes. Seriously, "Cross" and "Checkmark" are horrible alt attributes. To see why, try viewing your page in a text-only browser. With your HTML as it is, you'll see something like: Unregistered Basic Premium ------------------------------------------------------------------- ...


7

There actually are many things that you can do in Flash or Silverlight that are not possible in HTML5 (DRM/Content Protection, VBR-streaming, Embedding, fullscreen, COM access). This blog post from Google offers great insights to why even though there is a lot of potential for HTML5 to enhance the web, browser plugins are far from dead.


7

Modernizr is used to check the availability of HTML5 features in different rendering engines. It includes a script like Html5Shiv, which (only) enables HTML5 tags on Microsoft Internet Explorer (prior to version 9, which knew HTML5). See also "How to get HTML5 working in IE and Firefox 2". If you just want to enable HTML5 for IE < 9, then Html5Shiv would ...


7

If you need to jump users to in-page links, you can set the id attribute (which is used for more than just in-page links) on any element. Then use the usual # in the URL of a href attribute of an a element. Here's an example: <body> <p>Despite the many <a href="#gum-benefits">benefits</a> you may experience while ...


7

It's wise to use autofocus with a JavaScript fallback for browsers that don't support it. From Mark Pilgrim's Dive into HTML5 Forms: What’s that? You say you want your autofocus fields to work in all browsers, not just these fancy-pants HTML5 browsers? You can keep your current autofocus script. Just make two small changes: Add the ...


7

I am a product manager about to spend 40 MD supporting IE6 for a single customer. We sell software into call centers, an unfortunately IE6 is the default platform for many big organizations. My point is it depends, if I was building consumer web software I would have been off IE6 a long time ago, but as long as we have clients using IE6 we have to support ...


7

It's generally accepted best practice to have only a single <h1> on a page, or only 1 <h1> in a section for HTML5. Google will not penalise you for meeting the HTML standards, nor will it penalize you for having multiple <h1>'s - it may penalise you for having ONLY <h1>'s though. The important point is that it's about the ...



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