New answers tagged

1

The first <H1>Hello!</H1> is actually a placeholder for geo-targeting. It appends the name of your company (based on IP information) to that hello and if you visit it at night, it changes the text to Still Awake? (even though the code in the backend remains 'hello') followed by their second H1. For example, from my local PC, when I open the ...


2

It's not bad practice in principle, but the implementation in your example is. Using multiple <h1> elements on a page is perfectly valid HTML and no problem for SEO if used appropriately (in short, as headings for discrete sections of content). Former Google engineer Matt Cutts confirms this in a Q&A video. Note he states that overusing <h1&...


2

Nothing special to do here, the code is your content. You mark up your code with appropriate elements, and consumers (like search engines) then can do whatever they want to do with this information. A code search engine might be especially interested in it, other search engines might ignore it, most will probably don’t care and handle it in the same way like ...


0

Google handles some HTML elements differently than all the rest. We know that the title tag, description meta-tag, keywords meta-tag (depreciated), and h1 tag have unique influence in how much weight is given to these elements and the particular influences they have. In that, Google will always take the first one found and ignore the rest. This is more a ...


1

You're right. Two h1 elements in the same section is not a good idea, semantically or structurally, but it's not a HTML error. It's most likely a copy/paste error on their part but who knows why some people do what they do. Don't always look at any one company and think they write code perfectly in every way, all the time, no matter who they are.


0

Its really quite simple, and we were all new programmers at some point and time. You can use this link for anything really not just text. <a href="">Your Content here</a> That is the basic code for linking objects. It will be the same with images or divs all the same you would just add the content in the same area. Div Example: <a href="...


2

Make a .html File with the following content: <a href="http://website.com"> The Text </a> It's simple, isn't it? More information: http://www.w3schools.com/html/html_links.asp


2

The span element doesn't mean anything on its own. https://developers.whatwg.org/text-level-semantics.html#the-span-element This element is used as a hook for styling or javascript access and doesn't change the document flow. So Google might even just ignore the tag for that very reason and only look at the content of it except if one were to use it to ...


2

I don't think span tag will create any problem with indexing. Just make sure the h tag is closed properly e.g. <h1>...</h1>. If it is perfect then you don't need to worry about the indexing. Search engine will not have any problem crawling your website.


2

The span tag is pretty much the most general tag you can have within a html document and is therefore ideal for nesting within headings etc for many purposes, for example styling. I am sure Google will know this making the tool you are using a little misguided. If you were nesting h1's within h1's then things could get a little funky :).


2

is it a good practice to render different HTML contents from server-side based on screen size?...Also, we prefer not to separate the website into two versions... No for a couple of reasons. As closetnoc pointed out, your website will then commit an act of "cloaking" which is serving different content from one URL based on a screen size. Cloaking is bad ...


0

After looking at your given code, I think there will be no impact as far as the keyword ranking is concern. Normally changing h tags fluctuate the organic ranking, but in your case the html is looking simple so the change in the navigation bar will not create big problem for you. The content, UX, linking of the pages should be the same.


0

You can provide data that will be indexed, but this means you have to explicitly list all values (you can keep them hidden). While using meta elements for this purpose is possible, Google will only index up to 50 meta tags, so this will not work for "about a hundred different specific part numbers". (They don’t document that it would be possible to provide ...


1

The best practice is to omit the previous link (on the first page) and the next link (on the last page), because user agents without CSS support will display them, which might confuse users having them is pointless The link to the current page would ideally be omitted, too, because user agents without CSS support will display it in the same way like ...


2

There will be no negative impact on this from the SEO vantage point. Maintaining a navigation tree is more of an UX thing than an SEO thing. As long as both the pages are crawlable by spiders, you should be fine. If you still want to indicate a relation between the links, then create a tree on your HTML sitemap.


2

Okay. This gets a bit complicated. While no-one short of a search engineer can tell you what any search engine will do specifically, we know a few things based upon what Google tells us in a whole host of places. I will explain. Google will parse the HTML DOM objects from top to bottom assigning each HTML element with an ID that will uniquely identify the ...


0

It depends on how you're actually importing the code and the contents of it. If the code contains actual text valuable to search engine crawlers, then chances are, it might be bad for SEO because some search engine robots might not understand the new import tags. If the target audience are people with older web browsers, then importing might not even work ...


0

It does not affect to SEO only if you're using for legit purpose. Bad practice always heart SEO, it does not about whether you got penalize or not. For example, you got chance to write some article on quality website, but you're placing links with inline CSS so moderator don't see it, then it is consider as bad practice. But if you do for legit purpose ...


1

Google state that if you fail to distinguish your links then "your content becomes less useful". So, if your aim in SEO is to provide useful content, then yes - it can affect SEO. Google's SEO best practices specifically state that you should : Format links so they're easy to spot Make it easy for users to distinguish between regular text and the ...


-1

It'll not affect seo. At least as long as you don't try to make some(black hat stuff) links invisible (font color the same as background color) .


3

Don’t use another heading element for the duplicated content. Headings (h1-h6) serve various purposes (generating the document outline, navigation for screen reader users, etc.). A duplicated heading is useless and can be bothersome or lead to confusion. Using a different element and styling it according to your intended design is the correct way. Using p ...


1

No effect. Breadcrumb is specific structure to display tree structure of links. You can apply anchor attributes like title. H1 or other highlighters ( em,cite,headings) help to extract document meta-data. Link is for navigation ,so document highlighter does not effect on them.


0

An alternative to that would be the following code, but I am not sure how it would work with your plugin. <a class="fancybox" rel="group" href="full-size-image.png" style="background:url('full-size-image.png'); width: 300px; height: 200px;" ></a>


1

I don't think this is the place for these types of questions, you should use stackoverflow. However one way to deal with this is to edit the bootsrap source file. On line 4321 of bootstrap.css you will find the following: @media (min-width: 768px) { .navbar-toggle { display: none; } } Change the above media query to display the navbar-toggle (...


0

Absolutely no difference from SEO perspective. Both are same! The way SEO pages function is that they will give more priority to the tags such as h1, h2 ..etc. 'div's are just block level elements used for the HTMLisation purpose. It offers no contribution to SEO optimisation. From the point of semantics , it is important to avoid such glitches that can ...


0

HTML5 The non-normative section 4.10.1.3 Configuring a form to communicate with a server explicitly says that it is valid: Multiple controls can have the same name; for example, here we give all the checkboxes the same name, and the server distinguishes which checkbox was checked by seeing which values are submitted with that name — like the radio ...


2

The page is only fully loaded when all linked resources (including <script async defer) have loaded. This is when the onload event fires. However, the DOMContentLoaded event is likely to fire before this - which will probably be before the async defer scripts have loaded. (I say "probably" - if the browser is able to determine that it can load the script ...


3

In (X)HTML5, the a element’s href attribute […] must have a value that is a valid URL potentially surrounded by spaces. As the anchor suggests, it may contain leading and trailing spaces. The linked section makes clear that these spaces will be stripped: […] the user agent must remove all space characters that are at the start or end of the string ...


0

After You Create The Ad unit, it takes sometime to be Activated. So, it'll Automatically start showing Ads After Sometime.



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