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H1 can be used for main heading, and as per search spiders, they recommends to use only one h1 tag per page. And certainly it will affect your SEO. Say for example, have you seen multiple titles for a single book? If yes, then don't you think it will confuse readers about the content? If not, then how can you imagine same thing for your own website? thanks ...


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What is the correct usage of using the brand schema from schema.org? There is not one "correct usage" – it depends on what you want to convey. If you want to say something about a brand, you can use Schema.org’s Brand type. The Product type has the property brand, which takes a Brand item as value. This would allow you to reference the Brand from each ...


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Yes, only one H1. But there's an easy solution, which has it's own flaws (you could get very weird titles in SEO results!): <h1> <span class="responsive-hidden">This is my title</span> <span class="hidden responsive-show">This is my title</span> </h1> This is not a perfect solution! This is perfect for less ...


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While for the purposes of SEO, it may be true that the order is not significant, it is not true when considering other things like security, content (character) display, or loading speed. It is a good idea to order your page’s head roughly thus (presuming HTML5 for syntax): <head> So far in the document, you should not have used any non-ASCII ...


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Last week’s Schema.org release (version 2.0) introduced two relevant properties: mainEntity mainEntityOfPage This allows you to omit WebPageElement (which is not very useful in the first place) and use something like this: <body itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/WebPage"> <!-- properties about the web page --> <div ...


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Once you have submitted your site to Google via Webmaster Tools, you should see it starting to get indexed. It also helps to make use of all the tools in there,like the ones under "Search Appearance". It takes time for your site to be crawled and start showing up in searches.


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This sounds like an issue that is specific to your hosting provider. The likely explanation is that they have a check in place to look for malware on the home page of your site. Base64 encoded JavaScript is often used to obfuscate JavaScript inserted by a hack. Their malware scanner triggers when it detects any Base64 encoded data. To resolve the issue ...


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Using the following source code in a file name index.html in the root folder of a published website with a domain ending .com: <html><head> <link rel="icon" ...


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You would need to do two things, One: You will need to create the sub-domains in your DNS. You will use a CNAME (alias) for this. For example. Creating a CNAME for www.example.com that points to example.com is how www is added to a domain. You will be doing essentially the same thing. In your case, you would create a CNAME for... cl.example.com pointing ...


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it's called a subdomain. You would add it in cpanel - or whatever management panel you have.


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I lost 90% of my traffic over night because of duplicate content and I was able to get all my traffic back by using Blockquote with the cite attribute, but also increase by traffic by +82.5%. I wrote a blog post with all data, traffic changes and graphs here (http://condopilot.com/blog/marketing/how-i-increased-my-traffic-825-after-being-penaliz/) and you ...


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It looks like your url path for the actual icons are incorrect. Currently you are using ../ which means that your file is located up a level. I.e if you browsed http://example.com/home/ and assuming you had the icons in the root then it would work... but visiting just http://example.com would not work since ../ does not exist because you can't go any higher ...


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Use Structured Data markup to indicate the contentUrl of the image object. Here is an example using Microdata syntax: <div itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/ImageObject"> <a href="book.jpg" itemprop="contentUrl" itemprop="contentUrl" style="display:none;"></a> <img src="book_thumb.jpg" itemprop="thumbnailUrl"> ...


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You generally don't want to use noscript as crawlers will ignore that. By looking at the clean cache of your page: http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:http://www.balkanreporter.rs/&hl=en&strip=1 I can see text is visible on your page so you should be good to go. One thing to note is to update your anchor text to wrap around useful ...


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Google indexes two primary types of online information for which you can submit sitemaps for: pages, and images Access google webmaster tools and verify your site with them, then create a sitemap with a list of URL's to your large and other images you want google to see. Follow the example at: https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/178636?hl=en ...


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There used to be the loresattribute – but that points to the opposite direction, I suppose. Afaik there is no corresponding hiresattribute. You could however digg into the html5 <picture> element / adaptive images, which could also be useful if you're working on a responsive layout: <picture alt="screen-image.jpg"> <source ...


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One way to do this is to use an image of text rather than plain text. It is possible that Google will eventually be smart enough to read the text out of the image, so it might not be completely future-proof, but it should work well for at least a while from now. There's a bunch of disadvantages to this approach. If a person is visually impaired, it's bad. ...


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You need to make sure that both servers have the exact same document root folder defined in the configuration files. In a fresh install of apache, look at httpd.conf and find contents similar to this: # # DocumentRoot: The directory out of which you will serve your # documents. By default, all requests are taken from this directory, but # symbolic links and ...


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SO we are using clickfunnels, and it generates the HTML pages for you, but when we look at the HTML they provided, we realize that the HTML is generated from javascript through their site. ... SEO is a huge concern for us. Google won't be happy with indexing your site. Google likes unique content. According to ...


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Google has a spec for AJAX (SPA) applications, https://developers.google.com/webmasters/ajax-crawling/docs/specification. basically you need to provide the server the same content, but by using classic web site (request-response) technology. I call it a core site.


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Only recently did Google start looking through javascript but no one knows exactly what they do with it. Suffice to say they aren't going to render a lot of HTML for anyone's sake. Generating HTML for most of your page is never a good idea for SEO.


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It depends on how you are doing the JS. Google wont index dynamic content (usually) so if you are pulling these items from a db or remote server then you could have an issue. If you are just rotating through a finite array of items by alternating css classes and those are in the static html but hidden (a jquery approach) then the site should be ok.


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I'm looking at: https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/35769?hl=en#design_and_content_guidelines And it states "Avoid tricks intended to improve search engine rankings.". It also suggests you make the site primarily for users. I'm not sure if users want to see text change every three seconds. Also, the contents of the H1 tag are very important to ...



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