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2

In (X)HTML5, the a element’s href attribute […] must have a value that is a valid URL potentially surrounded by spaces. As the anchor suggests, it may contain leading and trailing spaces. The linked section makes clear that these spaces will be stripped: […] the user agent must remove all space characters that are at the start or end of the string ...


0

After You Create The Ad unit, it takes sometime to be Activated. So, it'll Automatically start showing Ads After Sometime.


0

Yes, it will be automagically corrected by the browser ,anyway if using spaces you get an error you can write them in another way: a URL, so a href, supports spaces, just replace them with "%20" Anyway if you write <a href="%20#id"> </a> This will result in a " #id" and not "#id" Eg: <a href="?How%20Are%20You">How are you?</a>


3

This is a good and specific question! I have answered this questions in parts all over the place, however, this question is specific enough to warrant it's own answer which will be very direct and helpful to others. First things first. Search is NOT about keywords. Google does not make direct term matches. Not even close. So please stop thinking in terms ...


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<h1> states it's the main heading. That's enough information for Google. If you care about SEO, you should probably have the <title> tag in your <head> section match as closely as possible your H1. How you style it is not an issue - provided you don't do dubious things like hiding the tag using CSS (display: none), or place other DOM ...


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If you end up splitting up the breadcrumb from the H1 tag like closetnoc suggested in the comments (which is a good idea I think), I think you're still left with the problem where you stated, "My site looks good. But putting a big heading at the top doesn't look as nice." In that case, I would still use the H1 tag (as you realize is very important) and ...


2

Short answer: No, there isn't, and in fact it might be a detriment. Longer answer: You're asking the wrong question. Bear with me for a moment here :) Google does its best to understand your site in a way that visitors to it will. It's only a bot, but it's pretty clever and the algorithms are constantly being updated. If you want to game Google, it ...


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As the author of the plugin suggested, this can be treated as a false-positive. Our SpamAssassin checks on mail-tester trigger a lot of false-positives, please ignore them.


-1

You can run your markup through the validator yourself to find out if what you wrote is valid. But valid markup is not always an indication of valid transport and spaces must be URL encoded (and the hash mark also). You can learn more by searching Stackoverflow. In particular, this SO answer. Your characters are not safe to use.


0

Why would you do this? Who writes code like that? That's unnecessary space in between "". Literal spaces are not allowed in URLs and they are not part of the data. just formatting for human consumption. You need to remove the whitespace. Some browsers render it as a space. Spaces are valid. And they both are different because, one has spaces, other ...


1

Yes. The definition of the href attribute for the link element says: […] must contain a valid non-empty URL potentially surrounded by spaces This links to the definition of valid non-empty URL, which links to the definition of valid URL, which says that is has to be a URL that conforms to the authoring conformance requirements in the URL standard ...


1

If possible do always use absolute links instead of relative ones. Why? Because relative links may cause crawl errors. Especially when it comes to alternate links you should make sure the bot finds exactly the URL you want it to crawl. Further it is not a good idea to use parameters for language indication. Please visit the following guides on multi ...


8

Looks like it. This example comes from the HTML5 specs: For example, the following link is a French translation that uses the PDF format: <link rel=alternate type=application/pdf hreflang=fr href=manual-fr>


0

The code seems in order. But one of the guidelines for use of AggregateRating "Make sure the reviews and ratings you mark up are readily available to users from the marked-up page. It should be immediately obvious to users that the page has review or ratings content." Reviews, I suppose, aren't present on the website. And I am guessing that you don't link ...


5

Yes it is possible using Apache and PHP, by setting the expires and cache-control using header(), you can find out more about what is, and what is not supported in the HTTP/1.1 specification. PHP headers will look something like this: $seconds_to_cache = 3600; $ts = gmdate("D, d M Y H:i:s", time() + $seconds_to_cache) . " GMT"; header("Expires: $ts"); ...



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