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1

This depends on the actual content (there is an important difference between, e.g., a hash and ASCII art) and the context (editable vs. presented content). So after choosing the appropriate element (and possibly WAI-ARIA), HTML5 offers the following options: The language tag zxx (IETF BCP 47/IANA registry) can be used for "no linguistic content": ...


6

nathangiesbrecht said in comments: Mostly because many e-mail clients have really lousy support for modern HTML. While table-based layouts are incredibly old-school, most e-mail clients will display them properly. You also want to keep your CSS all in-line as many e-mail clients strip out any other CSS (think web e-mail clients, and the problems an e-mail ...


2

The four most used notifications are "error", "warning", "success" or "info". (usually colored red, yellow, green and blue) For "error" and "success" we take for granted that the user has started a process on the page before the notification triggered. Thus we can also assume that this notification will never be crawled, no matter how you've implemented it. ...


1

I'd put it in which ever one is going to be easier for you. I wouldn't sweat the bots if you decide HTML is easier. There are ways to mask sections of your page if that is a concern as referenced here: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/8821256/how-to-tell-google-bot-to-skip-part-of-html


7

First of all, use better alt attributes. Seriously, "Cross" and "Checkmark" are horrible alt attributes. To see why, try viewing your page in a text-only browser. With your HTML as it is, you'll see something like: Unregistered Basic Premium ------------------------------------------------------------------- ...


10

It is perfectly valid for the alt attribute to be blank, if the images are purely decorational. Otherwise, if you are outputting the same image over and over then it makes sense that the alt attribute be the same for all of them. There is no negative SEO benefit to that, and your cross/tick images are unlikely to rank in image searches anyway. One ...


6

There is nothing wrong with having duplicate alt tags as its job is to describe the images for screen readers and users who have images disabled. So if you have the images on the page many times then it is likely you will have duplicate alt tags - it is semantically correct. Saying all that you could however describe your images differently for each one ...


6

You can remove the image from the td and just add it to the td instead. In your example you don't actually need the image, it has no content value, or SEO value. Because of that, you can do this: <td class="center Crossed" title="Cross"></td> .Cross{ background: url('/images/cross.png') no-repeat center center; height: 15px; } This has ...


-1

Since your preferred glyph is a graphic, I would suggest an alternative you didn't mention. It is the one recommended back when Wingding fonts were disallowed from the HTML standard. If you want to use an image, use an actual image. SVG would be idea if all your supported browsers can handle it. Otherwise, use a sufficiently large PNG to cover the largest ...


0

It depends on your use case, but we should probably be discouraged from using ' in natural language generally, so the issue shouldn’t arise unless you have computer code in your XML. Where we have strings translated, we find that some translators replace the closing quotes with the unicode curly quotes, but leave the straight quotes as the opening quotes, ...


2

I do not think this is your problem exactly. I remember reading somewhere that Google, while parsing HTML, makes the assumption that text in your case is a paragraph. However, I would bracket the text with HTML anyway. Google likes valid HTML because it is hard to parse otherwise. I would fix the HTML to be as HTML 4 compliant as possible at least. We do ...


0

Apart from the comments from Zistoloen and John Conde, the first thing to do is test yourself the situation. Replicate the situation and environment reported by the users to see if the problem happens to you. If you can't replicate completely the environment, at least try to do it as close as you can. Test the load of the site in many browsers, preferably ...


1

As you are using iThemes Security (formerly Better WP Security), it may be the case that your .htaccess contains: RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^Link [NC,OR] This seems to block the LinkedIn bot from visiting your page (to get the metadata). See the discussions: WP Better Security LinkedIn Problem Better WP Security Blocks Open Graph Data And the ...


0

HTML5 (CR) has an own section about conversations (e.g., for "dialogues in screenplays"). They recommend to use p and punctuation span/b for the speaker name (if a hook is needed for styling purposes) (but see my comment below regarding cite) i for stage directions Simple example: <p><span>Alice</span>: How are you?</p> ...


0

For your specific situation, I would recommend: Using a th element for the speaker name, as that makes more sense in the table context. Wrapping the spoken content in a blockquote element. For example, <td><blockquote>What they said.</blockquote></td> However I feel like there must be a way to achieve the design you want using the ...


0

No difference from SEO perspective. However, HTML semantics & performance should be taken into consideration. Unnecessary HTML tags also impact performance.


0

Which option should I choose and why? I would probably choose the second option, but add to that list text/css and text/javascript. Basically you want to compress any text-based content, but not content like images, as these are already compressed. I have omitted the type="text/css" attributes from all CSS references, as well as the ...


1

To my knowledge it does matter, for a very simple reason: A div is short for division, just a part/block on your website, where paragraph is designed for text. In something like a news article, a paragraph's first sentence is important(at least in Dutch language). It has vital information about what that paragraph is about (just think about it, every time ...


-2

Generally, SEO gives importance only for header tags (<h1>, <h2>, <h3>, <h4>, <h5> and <h6>). So no need to worry about <p> and <div> tags.


2

First, I would take all those <p> is more relevant for SEO than <div> with a big grain of salt. SEO really only cares about content relevancy. Putting text in a <div> or in a <p> is not something you should be tweaking. Just go to what is the natural use. <div> pretty much means 'this is a section of content' while <p> is ...


12

Between two options, there is no difference for SEO. By the way, your question is not about SEO but it's about HTML semantic. To respect the HTML semantic and unlike you think, the <p> tag exists for displaying paragraphs of text, not text. But in general, texts are displayed in a page through paragraphs. That's why you can use <p> tag inside a ...


0

It’s valid to use RDFa in HTML5. While xmlns still works, it is deprecated in HTML+RDFa 1.1. You should use the prefix attribute instead. If only one vocabulary is used, you could also use the vocab attribute instead of prefix. RDFa is much more powerful than Microdata. RDFa Lite (a subset of RDFa), however, is very similar to Microdata. Here is a small ...


0

The accepted answer is correct for XML sitemaps, but as per your comment, your question was about a HTML sitemap. There is no particular reason to use full URLs in HTML sitemaps. Either of your code examples would be fine, although the first (that uses absolute paths) would be my personal preference.



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