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0

Since I helped you with the htaccess file yesterday, I need to offer some advice here: Do not use Jaun's rule as a workaround. Leave both sites up, so the HTML based site stays indexed while you work on the WordPress Conversion. Sign Up for Google Webmaster Tools, and add both sites to your sitelist. Finish the WordPress Conversion, and remove the HTML ...


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I believe the problem is with your regular expression This sould work fine: RewriteEngine On RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f RewriteRule ^([^\.]+)$ $1.html [NC,L]


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Honestly, for this kind of situation it doesn't really matter that the class names are technically insemantic. We use insemantic class names for lots of things like grid systems. If you think about it, the decision of whether you align left or right is dependent on the content itself. The content and its presentation are tightly coupled: if the content ...


1

As you suggest in comments, the problem with using left and right as class names is when/if you later change the CSS to reposition these elements which then makes these class names confusing. Ideally class names should describe the type of element, not its position. eg. main-image, side-image, etc. However, if the purpose of these classes is to simply ...


1

Since HTML5, align is not an attribute to the img tag. As such, aligning an image is a CSS issue and not a semantic HTML one. As a rule, semantic HTML is to explain what the content is - ie is it an image, a citation, an address etc, whereas CSS styles are more for the aesthetics - is it blue, a large font, etc. Image alignment falls under the latter ...


3

There's no point in using nofollow on the image link. Why is the image link any different than the text link? They both point to the same place but only one is an authoritative link and the other is not? This is not how nofollow is meant to be used. Unless you do not have editorial control over the content in those links (i.e. you didn't add the links ...


1

Google knows what is what before your visitors do Google's crawlers have really advanced since there first launch, their crawlers has the ability to detect actual content area, the width of that content as well as the height of the actual content region. Repeated Content Elements such as headers, footers and sidebars that get repeated on several or all ...


2

As a rule, what makes sense for semantic markup and accessibility usually also makes sense for SEO, and you should certainly not damage usability or code quality for the sake of any SEO that Google have not recommended to webmasters. On-site SEO should be about helping Google index your site thoroughly and accurately, and not trying to find loopholes in ...


0

Even if you do not order anything and the navigation and sidebar div(s) appear in the HTML code before the content, Google and Bing can sort this out without too much trouble, however, there is a performance boost, albeit not a huge one, when you can push these elements below the content. The primary reason is because the HTML is read in byte order from left ...


2

I'm guessing you have an image with the alt "logo". Google can prepend/append text to titles if it thinks your titles don't meet their standards. And based on the results you show in the screenshot, your titles aren't very good, so it appends some text. In this case it decided that the word 'logo' represents you. How to fix: Change alt to "Logo ...


1

Thanks for posting the real FQDN; loading the actual page tells me right away what the issue is. The URL http://paperwork.japanaddicts.org/paperwork is not actually serving index.html from a directory, it is serving a file in the document root called paperwork. Since there is no file extension for the server to determine MIME type, it is being served as ...


3

The named character references added in HTML5 do not work cross-browser, though the support is relatively widespread now. Generally, there is hardly ever any reason to use them (as opposite to references defined in HTML 4.1, which are well supported). Quite independently of this, the characters themselves (no matter whether entered as such, as named ...


2

There is no benefit in using the hreflang on a single language website, it is meant exclusively for multilingual and international websites. I am not suggesting that Google (or other search engines) would penalize you for it, but they would definitely not reward you. You can see a proper implementation of the hreflang tag over at trip advisor - a well ...


-1

The head tag is optional so nothing cares and it doesn't matter in most cases.


0

Small amounts of duplicated content in your page or between your pages are unlikely to cause Google to penalize your site. See What is duplicate content and how can I avoid being penalized for it on my site? Content that is hidden by default but shown with user interaction will not cause penalties from Google either. See Google on toggled content. What ...


1

Does Googlebot care about valid HTML? In this YouTube Video, Matt Cutts says that the crawler is built to deal with HTML syntax errors. Google does not penalize you if you have invalid HTML. Google places more emphasis on quality content not HTML syntax. So I do not expect a faulty <head> tag to be the only reason for the site not being ...


1

It seems very likely that google will parse the site, like any browser they will try to ignore and work around many errors that their spider has to encounter on the many many sites that they spider. That's not to say that it won't depress your rank drastically, as such a broken problem probably will. As far as not being indexed at all, that certainly ...


0

Don't use like you have used it. Use it in <html> tag. Like following example: <html dir="ltr" lang="en">....</html> It is not necessary to put this attribute to your page as it just tells Google the language of page. It is not necessary because Google itself detects the language and it is very good in detecting any language. It is not ...


2

Google will index anything it can regardless of what errors/issues it contains providing it doesn't explicitly instruct Googlebot not to crawl. With a missing <head> section, anything such as the page title, meta tags, stylesheets and javascript calls etc will all be missing - this will cause a lot of issues in terms of how the site performs in ...


2

Using multiple H1 tags is valid in HTML 5, as long as each is inside a <section> element (except for the first H1 on the page which does not need a specific wrapper). For SEO, Google has confirmed that multiple H1 tags are fine. However, you ought to take another look at your responsive layout, as requiring an H1 in two different places seems strange ...


0

Google does index sites with 'invalid' html. You can see if the pages are indexed by doing a site:search as it could be that the pages are indexed, but just not ranking very well.


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Google indexes images that are either: In an image tag -- <img src="foo.jpg"> The target of link -- <a href="foo.jpg"> If you want to remove an image from the page but still have it indexed from that page, make a link to it on that page. This is a very good technique for image search optimization anyway. Google ranks very large images ...


2

No, a meta element cannot have an alt attribute in any HTML specification. Technically, you could have the attribute title="Facebook image", since the title attribute is allowed for all elements according to HTML5 LC (though not HTML 4.01), but it is very unlikely that any browser or search engine cares about it for meta; so it would matter as comment-like ...


1

I prefer to use the lang attribute of the <html> tag to declare the language for the current web page: <html lang="en" dir="ltr"> However, even that doesn't have any effect on SEO. Google doesn't trust any meta information (lang=, hreflang=, or anything else) provided with a page to determine what language it is in. It detects the language ...


0

There are JavaScript libraries available that will make HTML tables sortable by clicking on the headers. I've used sorttable in the past. To use it you have to include the script in the head of your document (note that "sorttable" has two "t"s here): <script src="sorttable.js"></script> And put a class "sortable" on any table for which ...


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There are no tangible benefits from using the hreflang attribute, beyond special usage like the one described by Google. It is declarative markup and does not cause any action or affect rendering, unless you make it to. The HTML5 LC explicitly warns: “It is purely advisory. [...] User agents must not consider this attribute authoritative — upon fetching the ...



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