Hot answers tagged

5

Yes, headings are still relevant for SEO, because they briefly describe topics of sections, they help organize your web page in a clear way, useful to show organized content for end users and help Search Engines to understand your content better. Designs can vary a lot, so a basic approach to your question would be: If you are listing cities, do they also ...


3

Don’t use another heading element for the duplicated content. Headings (h1-h6) serve various purposes (generating the document outline, navigation for screen reader users, etc.). A duplicated heading is useless and can be bothersome or lead to confusion. Using a different element and styling it according to your intended design is the correct way. Using p ...


2

The page is only fully loaded when all linked resources (including <script async defer) have loaded. This is when the onload event fires. However, the DOMContentLoaded event is likely to fire before this - which will probably be before the async defer scripts have loaded. (I say "probably" - if the browser is able to determine that it can load the script ...


2

Make a .html File with the following content: <a href="http://website.com"> The Text </a> It's simple, isn't it? More information: http://www.w3schools.com/html/html_links.asp


2

Nothing special to do here, the code is your content. You mark up your code with appropriate elements, and consumers (like search engines) then can do whatever they want to do with this information. A code search engine might be especially interested in it, other search engines might ignore it, most will probably don’t care and handle it in the same way like ...


2

The span element doesn't mean anything on its own. https://developers.whatwg.org/text-level-semantics.html#the-span-element This element is used as a hook for styling or javascript access and doesn't change the document flow. So Google might even just ignore the tag for that very reason and only look at the content of it except if one were to use it to ...


2

I don't think span tag will create any problem with indexing. Just make sure the h tag is closed properly e.g. <h1>...</h1>. If it is perfect then you don't need to worry about the indexing. Search engine will not have any problem crawling your website.


2

The span tag is pretty much the most general tag you can have within a html document and is therefore ideal for nesting within headings etc for many purposes, for example styling. I am sure Google will know this making the tool you are using a little misguided. If you were nesting h1's within h1's then things could get a little funky :).


2

is it a good practice to render different HTML contents from server-side based on screen size?...Also, we prefer not to separate the website into two versions... No for a couple of reasons. As closetnoc pointed out, your website will then commit an act of "cloaking" which is serving different content from one URL based on a screen size. Cloaking is bad ...


2

There will be no negative impact on this from the SEO vantage point. Maintaining a navigation tree is more of an UX thing than an SEO thing. As long as both the pages are crawlable by spiders, you should be fine. If you still want to indicate a relation between the links, then create a tree on your HTML sitemap.


2

Okay. This gets a bit complicated. While no-one short of a search engineer can tell you what any search engine will do specifically, we know a few things based upon what Google tells us in a whole host of places. I will explain. Google will parse the HTML DOM objects from top to bottom assigning each HTML element with an ID that will uniquely identify the ...


2

It's not bad practice in principle, but the implementation in your example is. Using multiple <h1> elements on a page is perfectly valid HTML and no problem for SEO if used appropriately (in short, as headings for discrete sections of content). Former Google engineer Matt Cutts confirms this in a Q&A video. Note he states that overusing <h1&...


2

I recently read about an SEO experiment where they tried using heading tags (<h1>, <h2>, etc.) and also tried using <div> and <span> that were styled to look like headers (large, bold, prominent text). Their conclusion was that the tags don't matter. Large bold text that is centered at the top of your content is weighted more ...


1

For SEO, are headings still worth it? Most definitely! If the page is incomplete, then you probably should not publish it (or at least make it not-indexable to search engines). In a complete page setup and to get a page advertised on google, its a good idea to have the following: A wonderful meaningful title under 65 characters. Anything over 65 ...


1

The first <H1>Hello!</H1> is actually a placeholder for geo-targeting. It appends the name of your company (based on IP information) to that hello and if you visit it at night, it changes the text to Still Awake? (even though the code in the backend remains 'hello') followed by their second H1. For example, from my local PC, when I open the ...


1

You're right. Two h1 elements in the same section is not a good idea, semantically or structurally, but it's not a HTML error. It's most likely a copy/paste error on their part but who knows why some people do what they do. Don't always look at any one company and think they write code perfectly in every way, all the time, no matter who they are.


1

Google state that if you fail to distinguish your links then "your content becomes less useful". So, if your aim in SEO is to provide useful content, then yes - it can affect SEO. Google's SEO best practices specifically state that you should : Format links so they're easy to spot Make it easy for users to distinguish between regular text and the ...


1

The best practice is to omit the previous link (on the first page) and the next link (on the last page), because user agents without CSS support will display them, which might confuse users having them is pointless The link to the current page would ideally be omitted, too, because user agents without CSS support will display it in the same way like ...


1

I don't think this is the place for these types of questions, you should use stackoverflow. However one way to deal with this is to edit the bootsrap source file. On line 4321 of bootstrap.css you will find the following: @media (min-width: 768px) { .navbar-toggle { display: none; } } Change the above media query to display the navbar-toggle (...


1

No effect. Breadcrumb is specific structure to display tree structure of links. You can apply anchor attributes like title. H1 or other highlighters ( em,cite,headings) help to extract document meta-data. Link is for navigation ,so document highlighter does not effect on them.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible