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It can be appropriate to use br in heading elements. An example from the HTML5 spec: <h1>Ramones <br> <span>Hey! Ho! Let's Go</span> </h1> If it’s appropriate in your case depends on your actual content (a heading listing three keywords is most likely not a good idea in the first place). However, even for inappropriate uses ...


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There is no reason to assume that Google Search would punish a page if the page’s navigation is not using ul. Using ul for navigation is good for various reasons, but the ranking in search engines is most likely not one of them. That Google Search is showing "LoremIpsumDolorSitAmet" in your result snippet is maybe because you are not using block-level ...


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There are two perspectives: What is valid RDFa? What do consumers (like Facebook) support? The first one can easily be answered by checking the specifications. The second one depends on each consumer: Is their documentation up-to-date/accurate/complete? How good are their parsers? For consumers, it would make absolutely no sense to support only a ...


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Partiz, I'm afraid what you want done is just not possible. See: https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/66353?hl=en Also, if you must have hidden text, then to somewhat minimize bad SEO effects, make a separate page with all the hidden text you want and in the source code of that page, include the following between <head> and </head>: ...


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This looks like a server-side caching issue with your site. (You perhaps need to remove the query string when generating a cache key?) The problem is with any query string, not just UTM codes. Try appending ?hello=world to any URL and you get an extended (20+ second) load time on the initial (non-cached) request. However, request the same URL again and ...


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Schema.org neither requires nor recommends specific image dimensions. For an ImageObject, you may specify the image’s height and width with the height and width properties. Consumers of the data would have their own rules, if any at all. In case of Google Search tl;dr: For some Rich Snippets that use the image property, no dimensions are specified. For ...


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There is a good chance that google understands your current breadcrumb method, class, and separators, especially if it mirrors category structure. You could indeed further enhance it with rich data via Schema.org semantics. Here is the Google guide as well as the recommended Schema.org reference. There is also the older "legacy" data-vocabulary reference. ...


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A delimiter is simply a character (or more than 1) that separates content parts of data. For example: > , / » So, the right angle bracket > you used in your examples are considered delimiters. The second one you suggest is redundant. It repeats the same keyword. There's no need. Nothing to add about importance of user-centric approach in writing ...


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Using meta (and link) elements for Microdata is fine. Sometimes there is even no sensible alternative to it, e.g., if specific codes have to be provided where it would make no sense to show them to your users. Google even uses meta in some of their Rich Snippets examples: Products and Software Apps: <meta itemprop="priceCurrency" content="USD" /> ...


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About your HTML: You can (and should) use semantic markup, of course. So, for example, the product container should probably be an article instead of a div, and the "Product Name" should probably be an h1 instead of span. Like Martin Hepp writes also, you have to use link instead of meta if the value is a URI. About your Schema.org: The price property ...



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