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4

Yes, only one H1. But there's an easy solution, which has it's own flaws (you could get very weird titles in SEO results!): <h1> <span class="responsive-hidden">This is my title</span> <span class="hidden responsive-show">This is my title</span> </h1> This is not a perfect solution! This is perfect for less ...


3

You would need to do two things, One: You will need to create the sub-domains in your DNS. You will use a CNAME (alias) for this. For example. Creating a CNAME for www.example.com that points to example.com is how www is added to a domain. You will be doing essentially the same thing. In your case, you would create a CNAME for... cl.example.com pointing ...


3

There used to be the loresattribute – but that points to the opposite direction, I suppose. Afaik there is no corresponding hiresattribute. You could however digg into the html5 <picture> element / adaptive images, which could also be useful if you're working on a responsive layout: <picture alt="screen-image.jpg"> <source ...


3

It looks like your url path for the actual icons are incorrect. Currently you are using ../ which means that your file is located up a level. I.e if you browsed http://example.com/home/ and assuming you had the icons in the root then it would work... but visiting just http://example.com would not work since ../ does not exist because you can't go any higher ...


3

Use Structured Data markup to indicate the contentUrl of the image object. Here is an example using Microdata syntax: <div itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/ImageObject"> <a href="book.jpg" itemprop="contentUrl" itemprop="contentUrl" style="display:none;"></a> <img src="book_thumb.jpg" itemprop="thumbnailUrl"> ...


2

Google indexes two primary types of online information for which you can submit sitemaps for: pages, and images Access google webmaster tools and verify your site with them, then create a sitemap with a list of URL's to your large and other images you want google to see. Follow the example at: https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/178636?hl=en ...


2

I lost 90% of my traffic over night because of duplicate content and I was able to get all my traffic back by using Blockquote with the cite attribute, but also increase by traffic by +82.5%. I wrote a blog post with all data, traffic changes and graphs here (http://condopilot.com/blog/marketing/how-i-increased-my-traffic-825-after-being-penaliz/) and you ...


2

While for the purposes of SEO, it may be true that the order is not significant, it is not true when considering other things like security, content (character) display, or loading speed. It is a good idea to order your page’s head roughly thus (presuming HTML5 for syntax): <head> So far in the document, you should not have used any non-ASCII ...


1

it's called a subdomain. You would add it in cpanel - or whatever management panel you have.


1

In addition to what was said here, I'd try use the same charset in all pages - preferably UTF-8 (but if nearly everything is iso-8859-1, use this). To quicky check the charset of a file, you can try: file --mime-type --mime-encoding {filename} To check the charset of all files in the tree, you can try: find . -type f -exec file --mime-type ...


1

One way to do this is to use an image of text rather than plain text. It is possible that Google will eventually be smart enough to read the text out of the image, so it might not be completely future-proof, but it should work well for at least a while from now. There's a bunch of disadvantages to this approach. If a person is visually impaired, it's bad. ...


1

You need to make sure that both servers have the exact same document root folder defined in the configuration files. In a fresh install of apache, look at httpd.conf and find contents similar to this: # # DocumentRoot: The directory out of which you will serve your # documents. By default, all requests are taken from this directory, but # symbolic links and ...


1

Google has a spec for AJAX (SPA) applications, https://developers.google.com/webmasters/ajax-crawling/docs/specification. basically you need to provide the server the same content, but by using classic web site (request-response) technology. I call it a core site.


1

It depends on how you are doing the JS. Google wont index dynamic content (usually) so if you are pulling these items from a db or remote server then you could have an issue. If you are just rotating through a finite array of items by alternating css classes and those are in the static html but hidden (a jquery approach) then the site should be ok.



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