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12

Between two options, there is no difference for SEO. By the way, your question is not about SEO but it's about HTML semantic. To respect the HTML semantic and unlike you think, the <p> tag exists for displaying paragraphs of text, not text. But in general, texts are displayed in a page through paragraphs. That's why you can use <p> tag inside a ...


9

It is perfectly valid for the alt attribute to be blank, if the images are purely decorational. Otherwise, if you are outputting the same image over and over then it makes sense that the alt attribute be the same for all of them. There is no negative SEO benefit to that, and your cross/tick images are unlikely to rank in image searches anyway. One ...


7

First of all, use better alt attributes. Seriously, "Cross" and "Checkmark" are horrible alt attributes. To see why, try viewing your page in a text-only browser. With your HTML as it is, you'll see something like: Unregistered Basic Premium ------------------------------------------------------------------- ...


6

There is nothing wrong with having duplicate alt tags as its job is to describe the images for screen readers and users who have images disabled. So if you have the images on the page many times then it is likely you will have duplicate alt tags - it is semantically correct. Saying all that you could however describe your images differently for each one ...


6

You can remove the image from the td and just add it to the td instead. In your example you don't actually need the image, it has no content value, or SEO value. Because of that, you can do this: <td class="center Crossed" title="Cross"></td> .Cross{ background: url('/images/cross.png') no-repeat center center; height: 15px; } This has ...


2

I do not think this is your problem exactly. I remember reading somewhere that Google, while parsing HTML, makes the assumption that text in your case is a paragraph. However, I would bracket the text with HTML anyway. Google likes valid HTML because it is hard to parse otherwise. I would fix the HTML to be as HTML 4 compliant as possible at least. We do ...


2

First, I would take all those <p> is more relevant for SEO than <div> with a big grain of salt. SEO really only cares about content relevancy. Putting text in a <div> or in a <p> is not something you should be tweaking. Just go to what is the natural use. <div> pretty much means 'this is a section of content' while <p> is ...


2

The four most used notifications are "error", "warning", "success" or "info". (usually colored red, yellow, green and blue) For "error" and "success" we take for granted that the user has started a process on the page before the notification triggered. Thus we can also assume that this notification will never be crawled, no matter how you've implemented it. ...


1

I'd put it in which ever one is going to be easier for you. I wouldn't sweat the bots if you decide HTML is easier. There are ways to mask sections of your page if that is a concern as referenced here: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/8821256/how-to-tell-google-bot-to-skip-part-of-html


1

An HTML email may contain all the the HTML tags. Specially important, even when redundant, is to use <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> (or whichever charset you want to use) to avoid potential problems with charsets on clients that don't read the headers, or do a post interpretation based on what they find on the ...


1

Other then the factors you have already stated I would say it mainly depends on what you expect people will do with the printable version of your productinformation: If they will mainly just print them out then will most likely be the best option. If you think people will want to safe them and send them around I guess a PDF would be superior for obivous ...


1

As you are using iThemes Security (formerly Better WP Security), it may be the case that your .htaccess contains: RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^Link [NC,OR] This seems to block the LinkedIn bot from visiting your page (to get the metadata). See the discussions: WP Better Security LinkedIn Problem Better WP Security Blocks Open Graph Data And the ...


1

To my knowledge it does matter, for a very simple reason: A div is short for division, just a part/block on your website, where paragraph is designed for text. In something like a news article, a paragraph's first sentence is important(at least in Dutch language). It has vital information about what that paragraph is about (just think about it, every time ...



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