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29

I usually don't put the logo or site title in an H1. The way I like to look at it is that each page is a document. That document is about a particular subject, as reflected in the page title and also the main heading. The website itself is just the publisher of the document. So, semantically, it's incorrect to use the site logo or name as the main heading of ...


19

See Page #37 of Google's SEO Report Card document: Most product main pages have an opportunity to use one <h1> tag, like the example above, but they're currently only using other heading tags (<h3> in this case) or larger font styling. While styling your text so it appears larger might achieve the same visual presentation, it ...


10

Yes, it does matter. According to the google webmaster blog, The lower the number on your heading tag, the more important the text, in the eyes of Google and your users. So, to tell google that the title is important, you should mark it up with an <h1> tag instead of an <h2> tag, which is considered less important to google. Edit: the ...


9

Hiding <h1> tag can hurt SEO because <h1> tag is a very good spot to optimize a webpage for a keyword. If I were you, I will try to reduce the size of the text in the <h1> tag or something similar but I won't hide this tag from search engines.


5

Here is a good rationale: Your logo is an image, not a <h1> Semantically, <h1> should be used for the page title, and the page title ought to be unique per page. Your logo or site name is not the page title (aside from perhaps the home page). Your logo/site name should be in a plain div, perhaps with ID of 'heading'. Or, the <header> tag ...


4

IMO there should be only one H1 on the page. And the H1 should always before the H2 - to maintain a correct hierarchy of your content. The logo is often repeated on every page and, like you say, on most pages the title is nearly always more important. On the homepage I would consider using: logo/title - H1[, title - H2] Although, on your homepage the logo ...


4

If you want to optimize your breadcrumbs for SEO use semantic markup or microformats


4

All of Stephen Ostermiller's answer is correct and Google is indeed now working to reward quality content rather than elements that are easy to spam. However, having an <h1> tag on a page is good practice and good for accessibility. It tells bots and screen readers that the text within those tags indicates the title on the page. If Google is rewarding ...


3

Its OK not to use H1 tags. On page optimization techniques and page structure matter much less to SEO now than they did even two years ago. You still need to use keywords and synonyms in the text of your pages and the title tag is the place in the page that matter the most. Beyond that, using H1, bold, and link anchor text may help a very small amount if ...


3

The sites do it so that they can use a particular font, which is not likely to be installed on most users' computers. That method is called sIFR, or Scalable Inman Flash Replacement. However newer browsers support newer font technologies as WOFF and companies which host web fonts for you like Fontdeck and Typekit. The advantage of them over the flash ...


3

What you're really looking for in your H1 tag is the page title or what makes this page unique. If you're using an image in it, you need to do it with a fallback method for degradability: <style> h1{background: url('imagePathHere.gif');width:60px;height:10px;} h1 span{display:none} </style> <h1><span>Unique Page ...


2

This is a terrific question, due to the practices (and templates) that are out there. Personally, I like to refer to "Outlining 101" logic, considering the following: H1 is like a title (certainly you like to complement your HTML title) and there should be just one per page, just as a page has only one title H2 is kind of like Roman Numerals in the ...


2

Keywords are not needed in the domain name for a page to rank for that keyword. Even keywords in the URL path don't help much (see Are keywords in URLs good SEO or needlessly redundant?) The page title (<title>) is the place where words give the most ranking weight. Other usages on the page can also help. It is important to note that overusing ...


2

Keep it natural and serve best value for your audience. If you only repair HP computers, then this should be made pretty obvious when visitors land on your website. Page titles should contain this so users of search engines are aware of this prior to clicking through to your website. There oughtn't be a need for this message to be replicated through page's ...


1

Many people assume that you should only ever use one H1 on the page otherwise it dilutes the actual content of the page, this simply isn't true. A H1 Company name and then a H1 for the content is absolutely valid by all means. Google has the ability to work out which is the content of the page and what is not, such as headers and footers. If are still ...


1

Give google a slightly altered page that contains the H2 tags. But I think this falls into the "Black Hat SEO" category. And I don't want that. You are correct, that is considered black hat by Google. They call it "cloaking". Put the heading. Hide it with CSS. Everyone wins, including accessibility tools witch can determine the structure of the ...


1

I've checked several sites that have site links. None of the ones that I have checked use headline tags around the links that get chosen as site links. Almost all the site links are chosen from navigation lists near the top of the page. The only site that has a h1 link on the page that I checked was CNN. They actually use a h1 tag for the title of the ...


1

While hiding <h1> can cause you problems, it depends on how you use it. However, we have no way of knowing what specifically Google looks for. In our case, we hide <h1> on our index page because it would be redundant and in the way but necessary for the outline and text only readers. This has not hurt our rankings at all.


1

<h1> is what defines the most important title on your page, and that makes a huge difference for SEO purposes. If you don't like your <h1> size or look you can always change it with CSS. Here is video where Matt Cutts talks about overdoing <h1>, from there you can see the value.


1

Using your keywords on the <h1> is a good and acceptable SEO optimization. You can also use these keywords on <h2> to optimize even more your page. After, if you use your keywords in your all <h1>, <h2> and <h3> on your page, it's kind of dangerous because it may be considered as keyword stuffing by Google. A good way of SEO ...


1

You want to use the h-tags to your advantage for SEO - I so often see them overlooked - and to do that you need to use them to provide relevant, succinct descriptions of the page's content. The <h1> tag generally should contain the main theme of the page, which could be the page title or a variation/elaboration of it. If your exisitng, static ...


1

Google and other search engines usually read things like recommendations from the W3C and RFCs. According to a W3C recommendation for The global structure of an HTML document: A heading [h1,etc] element briefly describes the topic of the section it introduces. Heading information may be used by user agents, for example, to construct a table of ...


1

Images are not headers and generally using <h1><img src="" alt=""/></h1> is bad practice, you could opt to use a text-indent: -9999em but this is becoming unfavourable and the best practice is just to use a H1 as intended. The text indent method is pretty easy to do you just do something like this in the HTML/CSS: HTML <h1><a ...


1

Sure may not affect search rankings but the Description sometimes appears in search results so I'd put it there. I'd also look at setting up your locality in Webmaster Tools. As to the other tags why not adopt a mixed approach: <meta name="Description" content="XXX Ltd repairs motherboard for HP computers in Philadelphia" /> <meta name="keywords" ...


1

It would be helpful if you shared a link, but in lieu of actually inspecting the problem I can offer the following: Check the line-height css property of the element and be sure that it is enough to accommodate the text, as well as seeing if the element has overflow: hidden set. If it is an inline-block element, check the vertical-align property as well as ...


1

Instead of trying to blindly replace all bold words with header tags (which could easily lead to breaking an article), you need to educate your authors on the importance of the header tags, what they mean and their direct SEO benefits. Tell them that their article will likely receive more views if it is structure correctly, and doing so will make them a ...


1

The standard recommendation is Yes to the first question and No to the second but there are no absolutes. Both the title and H1 should at least use the same keywords but you may vary it to suit how the H1 is displayed. The H1 is almost always more visible to the user, so search engines tend to emphasize it more. For the business name, if you want to ...


1

I would say no. The semantic meaning of headers, H1 especially, doesn't really lend itself to breadcrumb navigation at all. I'm not sure how strictly search engines adhere to this, but having that many terms in your heading would look awfully spammy. I'd say keeping it in a standard [un]ordered list would be best, or even wrapping it in a nav element (which ...


1

I would go with Images instead of Flash. You can put the content of the image ( i.e.: "home") in the ALT and Title-tag. I don't know whether Google is already able to navigate through Flash menu's, but if it doesn't, it's far more SEO and user-friendly to use images. Edit: There are scripts available which convert <h2> tags, for instance, to image ...



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