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10

Google does not just ignore links in sections that are display:none. Consider DHTML multi-level drop down menus. In such a menu, you hover over the top level menu item and a list of links drops down. That is a case in which the links are in display:none initially, but user interaction with the page shows them. Using drop down menus like this is ...


8

What to do (right now I am awaiting the restore of files from hosting provider)? Fix the holes that caused you to get hacked in the first place. If it was a result of the web host's neglect then find a new host. Keep backups of your site so you don't depend on your host for this. How to prevent this? If you write your own code you need to ...


7

FYI, this won't hurt your website from an SEO point of view. Unsolicited one way backlinks can never hurt you (if you purchase links those one way backlinks can hurt you). If they could then tactics like this would be an easy way to sabotage your competition. At worst, one way backlinks have no value. This is probably the case with the links you are ...


6

This kind of attack won't affect your rankings as bounce rate is almost certainly not a ranking factor. It's hard to say why this user is doing this but I doubt it's to manipulate your bounce rate or site stats. More likely reasons are: they are trying to attack your site through that page. that page being loaded somehow benefits them and thus they are ...


5

Start from Scratch If you have a recent database and files copy nuke all and start all over again. This is truly the best way there is when you have been hacked in a massive way. No Good Backups Most of the time there is no good backup in my experience. And I guess you do not either. If you did a scan with ClamAV and or online scans with sites like ...


5

This is almost certainly a robot. It is a common trick for robots to use simple heuristics to look for URLs within JavaScript strings. It's fairly simple for absolute URLs, but for relative URLs it can be hit and miss, in this case clearly more of a miss. The fact that the robot is not crawling with a user agent that identifies him may mean that it has ...


4

Your site currently has some malicious Javascript embedded in the bottom of your site that embeds an iframe in your page. This could infect visitors with malware, attempt to steal their passwords, or do all sorts of other nasty things. There are a couple of steps you can take to remedy this problem. Reinstall the latest version of WordPress It's very ...


4

If you are concerned, I would contact the site administrators for the sites that have your link erroneously and request them to take it down. You can also let them know that a bot has been doing this so they can increase their security.


4

In case you're curious, here's the source (or a copy of it) to the attacker's method: http://pastebin.com/yCW9vWzZ This may help also: http://www.wjunction.com/10-hosting-discussion/116021-boxslots-hacked-again-5.htm As for being worried? If you are sure you follow the orthodox server security protocols, and you actively check for and fix any holes, then ...


4

So far as I understand it the tag is locked to traffic from a domain/subdomain or group of domains unless you choose the third option in the tag setup. Referer spam does happen, but what would you achieve by doing this?


4

Goo.gl is a URL shortener. It just means someone linked to your website using it. Pu.gg is a torrent tracker. I don't know why you would get pageviews from them. You may be hacked and hosting a torrent file. You should get your site out and look for any suspicious files.


4

Not all countries have strong copyright laws. This is unfortunate. In the U.S. and Europe, there are legal actions you can take. In India (I may be assuming too much here), I have no idea. I suggest contacting an attorney and simply ask a few questions. In the U.S., this is a criminal act and any civil action can result in recovering payment for damages plus ...


3

To answer your question about "how somebody can write new files into my hosts" there are three ways I've seen this happen. First, FTP account hijacking. The worst case I had to deal with on my sites is when a hacker gained access to either a root level or high level account that allowed them to overwrite the index pages of all of the sites on that shared ...


3

It's more than likely your WordPress install has been compromised. The permanent fix is to follow these steps to ensure it is fully cleaned and to prevent a recurrence. This is the best method to ensure it is 100% clean. Backup the database Make a note of the customizations, such as plugins or any other modifications you’ve made. Remove all files from the ...


3

It's very unlikely they're hacking anything. It's quite likely they're just using a robot/macro to download all the .zip files so that they don't have to manually click each one. What type of files are in the .zip files?


3

Could you have a competitor interested in putting you offline? Are they idiots (and russia based) or could they being paying some idiot from russia? If not, then maybe you're getting hits from a single router in some educational or governmental institution in which you suddenly became popular. What are you checking their ip with? Try maxmind. Its resolver ...


3

From this question: You could do several things including: Use a CAPATCHA like reCAPTCHA Use a field that requires the user to answer a question like what is 5 + 3. Any human can answer it but a bot won't know what to do since it is auto-populating fields based on field names. So that field will be either incorrect or missing in ...


3

It's a robot scanning the web for WHMCS installs that are vulnerable to this attack, it's just part and parcel of running a website.


3

there currently aren't any safeguards in place, and while uncommon people can spam your account, for example, if they hold a grudge. If you are spammed you cannot remove this data. It is best to put in place a precautionary filter, selecting 'include only' and 'traffic from the domains' and setting this to your domain(s) which you want to be included.


3

It became known in 2009 that IIS had a vulnerability in that it determined filetype by the part of the filename preceeding a semicolon if there was one in the name. See this NIST description for more details.


3

I'm assuming that the bind.php file is not actually a part of Joomla, but rather a malicious script that the hacker uploaded to your site. In particular, just looking at the request parameters, it appears likely that the script is being used to send e-mail spam, possibly using someone else's hijacked e-mail account. Here's what the request parameters in ...


3

For example, do I need to worry about the MySQL databases themselves being compromised? Or if I manually move them would they be ok? Yes, you absolutely have to worry about the MySQL being compromised along with just about everything else. The best thing to do here is move as little as humanly possible to preserve the content. Plugins, themes, etc ...


3

The bots are probably harmless. But I like to think that I'm starring in a Tom Clancy novel and it's a sleeper cell waiting to unleash a tidal wave of spam that could ultimately compromise national security. So I recommend deleting them on a routine basis. ;) When a user signs up, determine what country they're from. I find that MaxMind's GeoIP web service ...


2

You apparently have a security vulnerability in your code. You need to fix the vulnerability and remove all traces of the attack from your database and/or files.


2

Log IPs, 1 vote per IP only CAPTCHCA Use built in server side script functionality to ensure post request originated from same server


2

You state that your application's configuration was changed - are you certain that is the case? It sounds as though your database was hosted on the same server as your application itself - in which case the configuration may very well have been to access the locally-hosted database. Definitely not an ideal situation and it sounds as though you have a right ...


2

I just came across a recent YouTube video from Matt Cutts on this topic. Google is now letting webmasters disavow links: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&v=393nmCYFRtA&NR=1



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