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Google, conceptually, uses an HTML DOM parser. What this does is break any web page HTML down into its basic structure and each HTML tag is given an ID. This ID represents the order of the HTML tags from beginning to end, any dependency between HTML elements such as a li tag is dependent upon a ul tag, any parent-child relationship between HTML elements ...


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I'm head of SEO for a website with a similar structure to your own: The with large amounts of content coming from the same template but being filled out by Event details. Google will choose whether a page is worth indexing or not. If it deems a page too sparse on content, it will drop it from the index. There are penalties for bad linking and bad content. ...


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Google would be happy to index billions of very unique web pages, but it hates indexing multiple URLs that point to exactly the same content. For your match pages, you need to make sure the information is unique enough. If one page has this content: This football event just happened between (insert team name here) and (insert other team name here). Here ...


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"Cloaking" in this situation would be fine. When the user agent contains bot|crawl|slurp|spider you should not use session id parameters or check for cookies. You are delivering the same content to users and bots. Google won't have a problem with this particular cloak. I use a similar technique for deciding whether or not to use Data URI for the images ...


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When Google determines that your site is having problems, it will slow down the rate at which it crawls. If your site is less responsive, or is giving Google 500 errors, Google will make fewer request per day to your site as a whole. Googlebot will never give up on any particular URL. Google will come back and try that URL again. How soon it comes ...


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The AdsBot crawler with user agent AdsBot-Google (+http://www.google.com/adsbot.html), is part of AdWords not AdSense. It is supposedly used for checking landing page content to determine quality score. This bot appears to also visit pages that are not ad landing pages, including pages with no ads on them, no ads to them, and no links to them. Based on the ...


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If you have a new page, you probably have a link to it. Google visits your page often and will catch the link. If it's a matter of new content, that may take longer because I don't think Google examines content as often as it examines links. This is why they recommend a sitemap. When you have a significant change to a page, you can update your sitemap and, ...


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There is no easy way to measure this as there doesn't appear to be a hard limit and Google is so complex it's difficult to measure. However, the more intermittent the service the lower an URL will rank as it accrues a performance penalty. This would lead me to guess that it's based on a curve rather than a binary 'indexed' or 'not indexed'. The only thing ...


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Use Hreflang codes to indicate to Google which site it should index for which region. You'll find it then indexes all those links and presents them according to the engine the user uses to access the site. This largely replaces the need to identify a users location - even using a good service, it's going to be wrong if a user is behind a VPN or is part of ...


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This article suggests that Google will cache content loaded by an onscroll event: http://dinbror.dk/blog/lazy-load-images-seo-problem/ Admittedly that is for images, but I can't see why it wouldn't work for other content. I would test though.


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I recommend your option of using the URL Parameter Tool in search console. For each of your tracking parameters, add it to the tool and set it to "Doesn't effect page content (ex. tracks usage)." When you tell Googlebot that these are passive parameters, Googlebot will usually crawl just one URL with a specific parameter value. If the parameter can be ...


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But, without Googlebot being able to crawl the live URLs on pages, the way they're appearing on pages, it won't be able to follow the links and give them any weight, authority and relevance to these pages. Is that right? In theory yes, but my personal interpretation of having backlinks to pages that are not accessible to search engines is that they do play ...



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