Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

53

.google actually is a valid top level domain (or top level zone), as is '.youtube'. Google applied for those TLDs a long time ago... successfully as we can now see. Google can now further delegate authority within that zone and com.google and other subdomains (or delegated zones) can become valid and be operated. Here's a news article on zdnet about this ...


18

The How... In the past few years icann opened up applications for custom GTLD names, you can take a look at application statuses on the ICANN website. Expect to see many new company names as gTLD in the next few years such as .bbc,.foodnetwork,.hilton etc. Sadly these scheme was only for the super rich or big corps with buckets filled with 100 dollar bills. ...


15

Most likely, you cannot. But don't worry — all hope is not lost. Of course, as suggested in the other answers, you could try simply asking the site hosting the image to take it down, replace it with a more flattering image, or at least to change its name and descriptive text to make it rank less prominently for your company name. However, I'm going ...


10

No, it's not part of Google's policy. "Right to be forgotten" law (EU) is for individuals only. For an example, search for "jew", in the front page there is anti-semitic page jewwatch and Google have said they won't remove it either, even though Brin and Page (Google founders) are jews. If you think someone is spreading lies about your company that are ...


10

Google seems to put very little weight on how a URL is structured right now. You can confirm this by doing any Google search and looking at the URLs that are ranking. You are just as likely to see any of these styles: Exact match domain: www.keyword-phrase.com Exact keyword path: example.com/keyword-phrase Lots of directories: ...


10

That's a very bad idea and your site will suffer in the organic search rankings. For one, Google does have image recognition abilities and so your assumption that the bot can't "view" the image is wrong. And two, the algorithm does render pages to decide whether they are not mobile friendly and if your pages are delivering different content to users and to ...


10

Because Microsoft Edge presents a User-Agent string that contains the word Chrome. And, for that matter, Safari. Check out http://whatsmyuseragent.com/ and you'll see something like this: (Emphasis mine) This is deliberate on Microsoft's behalf to fool naïve user-agent checks into thinking that it's not Internet Explorer. Which it isn't.


9

As John says, this is fake traffic known as "referral spam". This morning I had about 80% of my "traffic" coming from this same domain. Rest assured, you are not paying Google for these clicks. The basic idea behind referral spam is that some hosts will publish their logs or Analytics data publicly, thus creating links and/or text references to their ...


7

Be careful. Most SEO advice stems off of old advice that was just plain wrong when it was written. It seems that much of the SEO world cannot grasp that SEO has become much closer to what it should have been all along. As well, this is a follow the leader industry even as the lemming leap off the cliff. I will give you a quick SEO rundown. For each page, ...


7

Google expects differences between mobile and desktop sites. Even major differences, including differences in link structure, are not a problem. Google crawls the web with different Googlebot user agents for mobile. As long as your server shows that version of Googlebot the same thing that your actual mobile users see, you don't have any penalty risk. ...


6

To know the age of an URL you can follow this link by replacing www.example.com by the URL you want: https://www.google.com/search?tbs=cdr%3A1%2Ccd_min%3A1%2F1%2F2000&q=site%3Ahttp%3A%2F%2Fwww.example.com&safe=active&gws_rd=ssl For example, here's the result from Google for the Meta site of Stack Overflow: Otherwise, the Wayback machine is ...


6

As to whether Google penalizes (special attention to this word) a site for being stagnant. The answer is "No." Absolutely not. Here is what you are missing. Google uses a TTL style metric to gauge any pages freshness. TTL stands for Time To Live and is used to do two things: one, gauge how often to re-fetch the page; and two, use as a metric for the SERPs. ...


6

...is it considered to be duplicate content if the site is in another language which happens to be an exact duplicate? Google doesn't consider the same content translated into different languages as duplicate content since the same content in English that's translated into French is different, unlike the same content appearing twice in English, as ...


6

You can combine site: with search: site:jcfrog.com "Le Conseil de l’Europe livre un rapport très critique sur les pratiques de la NSA " Just type your site:exampl.com and add something to the query that's unique for that specific page and check the result if they match. Note the quotes around the string, telling google "Find this string as a whole"


6

The "problem" with the second URL is its query component (?EbY-kA), which Google ignores for the site: operator. You could use the inurl: operator in addition: site:jcfrog.com/shaarli/ inurl:EbY-kA However, this does not guarantee that the query component comes directly after the path that is specififed in site: (e.g., it would also find pages with URLs ...


6

The idea to make a site mobile friendly is excellent, but I don't think your method is best, especially if later you decide to monetize your website with adsense for these reasons: You're scripting your site so that text is hidden if a screen resolution is under a specific value. Google may think you're playing games when you use this technique and might ...


6

robots.txt can block JavaScript files from Googlebot. http://www.robotstxt.org/ has more information about how to construct a robots.txt file. You could put your JavaScript that shows the password into an external JavaScript file (called showlists.js): $(document).ready(function(){ showLists(); }); Call that JavaScript file in the page head: ...


5

I'm not sure if this changed over the years since this was asked; while in theory you can (as the first answer states), in practice Google at least will give you an error (as seen in their Webmaster Tools): Incorrect Sitemap index format: Nested Sitemap indexes The Google help page further states: A sitemap index file can't list other sitemap index ...


5

Google ranks HTTPS sites higher. Well-configured HTTPS sites are also a lot faster (thanks to SPDY), and that also affects ranking. The HTTP site is considered separate from the HTTPS site, and to avoid duplicate content you need to pick one of the sites (normally the HTTPS one) as canonical. See here for more info on redirects, linking, and transitioning ...


5

Using the link: operator is not an accurate or official way to find out what links you have to your website. Google omits links on purpose to prevent SEO analysis of other websites you do not control. To get an accurate report of your incoming links you need a Google Webmaster Tools account. Under Search Traffic > Incoming Links you will see what links ...


5

I think you answered your own question in the first statement. Using the same anchor text for a lot of your links is not a good idea. Instead, try using something more descriptive. However, this is very common so I would not get fixated on this unless your entire page says nothing but "read more". Search engines are smart enough to recognize that "Read ...


5

There is a tool that will automate what closetnoc suggested, using Google Auto suggest. Keyword Tool Type in a keyword and it will give you all the related Google Auto suggests, which are based on what people are searching for.


5

It's a good idea to redirect example.com to www.example.com. Because you can't use a CNAME for example.com's DNS record, which greatly reduces your options for things like load balancing and resilience.


5

Maybe it's just your simplified example, but your example can be rewritten to use just CSS and media queries only, no JavaScript is required here and no change to the source. You are "half" using a media query to hide the desktop HTML and using JavaScript to copy the contents of the desktop HTML (in its entirety) into a mobile container - which is ...


5

This related thread, Well structured URLs vs. URLs optimized for SEO , explains it pretty well. My understanding is that the URL will have a slight SEO effect depending on how users tend to search for content on your site but a logic site structure that is easy to update (as websites rarely are static) could perhaps be more valuable than the SEO advantage... ...


5

Humans can get confused/irritated by deep hierarchies. Be kind to your users. Google Analytics only analyzes (breaks up) the first 4 path parts You know that geographies aren't really hierarchical right? What continent is Turkey in? What state is Texarkana in? You should use a hyphen to break up words in URLs.


4

As of November 2014, Google announced that is not going to be updating Pagerank as available from the Google Toolbar. Any means of checking Pagerank is no longer going to work. The Google toolbar and all third party PR checkers will only show old stale data.


4

Google isn't ignoring your robots.txt as robots.txt does not tell Google not to list that content in its search results. It tells Google not to crawl content. So Googlebot cannot find this content on its own. But if it does find this content it will still list it in the search results. To keep content out of the search results you need to use the ...


4

Your current meta description is too long to fit into Google's search results pages. If this happens, instead of truncating the current description, Google often pull content from elsewhere on the page to create a description. This often results in unhelpful, incomplete or widely inaccurate description such as yours. The first thing you should do is ...


4

Two of the most widely used web servers have very different settings for case sensitivity of URLs by default. Whether or not your URLs are case sensitive is likely a function of which you are using: Microsoft IIS - case insensitive URLs - shows the same content regardless of capitalization. Apache HTTPD Server - case sensitive URLs - gives a 404 not ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible