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5

Using the link: operator is not an accurate or official way to find out what links you have to your website. Google omits links on purpose to prevent SEO analysis of other websites you do not control. To get an accurate report of your incoming links you need a Google Webmaster Tools account. Under Search Traffic > Incoming Links you will see what links ...


4

Google isn't ignoring your robots.txt as robots.txt does not tell Google not to list that content in its search results. It tells Google not to crawl content. So Googlebot cannot find this content on its own. But if it does find this content it will still list it in the search results. To keep content out of the search results you need to use the ...


3

You can't. It violates Google's terms of service which you agreed to in order to create that Google site. If you do not wish to have a "powered by" link, you can try to use another provider for your website.


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It is highly likely that Google reduces the linkjuice passed from one site to another if it is on the same IP address because Google makes the logical and reasonable assumption that the link isn't an unbiased link. Google uses links as 'votes' for how important a site is - the more links it gets from other sites the higher it's 'authority'. The more links ...


2

According to searchenginewatch.com: -Set up a Google Places for Business and Google+ page. This post outlines the most important aspects of both services, and explains how to merge the two types of pages for a single business. -Make sure images are high resolution, unique, and order them in terms of your priority. -Encourage happy customers ...


2

Your current meta description is too long to fit into Google's search results pages. If this happens, instead of truncating the current description, Google often pull content from elsewhere on the page to create a description. This often results in unhelpful, incomplete or widely inaccurate description such as yours. The first thing you should do is ...


2

As John Conde pointed out, the link: method is ridiculously inaccurate. However, I'd also like to point out that Google Webmaster Tools isn't fully accurate either and that it can take a noticeable amount of time before links begin to display (Google have admitted this themselves). If you read this FAQ, you'll see: Q: I know I have [one / several / ...


1

This is one way people canonicalise duplicate product pages on ecommerce and is a valid way to use it. As long as the content on the product page is identical, or a large part of the content is exact and appears on both pages. If the pages are not extremely close in exact words, the canonical designation might be disregarded by search engines. For the most ...


1

If 300 or so sites are all publishing the same content it probably is hurting their Google ranking. If it isn't yet, it will at some point. Having the same content available on multiple URLs, especially multiple websites, is exactly what Google doesn't want. They want a canonical source for content so they can ranking it properly and not have redundant data ...


1

Upon further investigation, it seems like a bug with Google plus. http://searchengineland.com/google-loses-real-estate-search-brand-boxes-dropped-logged-users-203567


1

having rel publisher tags does not guarantee google will show the brand associated with the Google+ brand page. Few things you want to check. 1. Make sure you have not recently chosen and new URL for your google+ page (changing from # to something custom). 2. Make sure that this is happening when you request the raw page. Actually type the full url in ...


1

No you cannot add the x-JP wildcard as you want, but since your site is in English (EN) and German (DE) only, then you would do it like this: <link rel="alternate" hreflang="en-JP" href="http://www.example.com/japan/" /> <link rel="alternate" hreflang="en-AR" href="http://www.example.com/argentina/" /> <link rel="alternate" ...


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No you cannot do this using hreflang, they are primarily for language and location is optional, but you cannot just mark up the location: Do not specify a country code by itself! Google does not automatically derive the language from the country code. Use hreflang for language and regional URLs I think the other option here is to try and detect what ...


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Google Webmaster Tools identifies keywords for your site, however, this has no connection with performance for those keywords. These listed keywords are site keywords (for the site overall) but SERPs (search engine result pages) return results for individual pages. It is a mistake to expect to perform well for keywords within this list because the list does ...


1

I believe this practice is known as a Link Wheel in SEO terms. The idea is to have a bunch of different sites (known as spokes) each generating content to point to your main "target" domain (where he sells stuff). Each spoke site will generally link to one of the other spoke sites, and also to the target site. Thus passing half the link juice to the other ...


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Adwords Keyword Planner will give you rough estimation of the search volume. Note that it will not show data for niche search terms which have a few queries per month. https://adwords.google.com/KeywordPlanner


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Search changes each and every day. Google says that %15 of all searches have never been seen before. There is no way on knowing the future, but you can get a peek into what Google thinks is relevant today. First: You can use Google Trends found here: http://www.google.com/trends/ Just enter your keywords. Second: In the search text-box, enter your keywords ...


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If you have implemented proper redirects for all the content of your old websites and nothing is served from these old websites, then yes, you can delete the sitemap(s) from the old websites. Just make sure you have a new one on the new site with new URLs.


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No. Just remove the pages that are no longer part of the old site. Search engines periodically re-crawl the sitemaps so there is no need to delete it. Only the obsolete content needs to go.


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For long time now, Google adjusts search results according to your search history. You can read about it here: https://support.google.com/accounts/answer/54068?hl=en To check ranking you should use a browser with no history, or a ranking tracking software/service.


1

I just checked your page and noticed that Google Tag Assistant is indicating that the tag is installed correctly. I observed that your page is sending a pageview hit back to GA as well. Your GA code looks good on your site - correctly placed. Are you still having problems? You can also check in Real-Time reports if you are tracking hits. If you are, then it ...


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You can use binary search to figure out which URLs are not indexed: Split your sitemap in half into two smaller sitemaps Submit each of those sitemaps Repeat these steps for each sitemap that Google reports isn't fully indexed until you are down to a sitemap with just one unindexed URL in it.



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