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8

The Visual Website Optimizer blog has an A/B test duration calculator designed to answer your question. It's published as an Excel spreadsheet, but don't let that put you off. Enter your original conversion rate, the difference you're hoping to detect, the number of variations you're testing, and your average daily traffic, and it spits out the number of ...


6

The utmx_section("Headline") command will execute as the document is parsed. If it emits a <noscript> tag using document.write() the browser will ignore that particular section, until it meets the </noscript> tag. Here is the same trick, but with a h1: <html> <head><title>Spike</title></head> <body> ...


4

You can install Google Analytics Opt-Out on your browser. Since GWO runs off of the Google Analytics script, it will show variations but will not send to the data to GWO. FWIW, GWO will only count you once per browser. In other words, if you visit your experiment a dozen times from Chrome, it will still only count you once. Important to note that this ...


2

Instead of doing something with your robots.txt which doesn't always do what you want, the better option is to just include a <link rel='canonical' href='XYZ' /> tag in all version of the page you are A/B testing and just make XYZ equal to the original/master version of the page. That way you know for sure that Google is crawling at least one page. ...


2

Look for the _utmx cookie for the site in question. From Google You can use Google Analytics with Google Website Optimizer (GWO), which is a tool that helps determine the most effective design for your site. When a website optimizer script executes on your page, a _utmx cookie is written to the browser and its value is sent to Google Analytics. See the ...


2

Assuming that screenshot is for the domain you're talking about, the first thing you should be doing is actually providing a meta description in the first place. Right now it's blank. It's not guaranteed the engines will use your meta description, but the reason they're digging into your page content in the first place is that you're not even making a ...


1

Some other tips for optimizing CSS: Losslessly compress the CSS before serving it. I use yui compressor For page rendering time, applying CSS rules based on Id is much more efficient than applying CSS rules based on class. So use #mydiv rules when possible rather than .mydiv rules. This is because browsers typically implement a hashmap for quickly ...


1

Some ways to optimize CSS so that improves page performance: Remove unused CSS rules: Audits tab within Google Chrome Developer Tools (Ctrl+Shift+I) lists unused selectors as part of its performance recommendations Minify CSS - Minification is the practice of removing unnecessary characters from code to reduce its size thereby improving load times. When ...


1

Why wouldn't you use Google Website Optimizer? On dynamic pages such as big ecommerce sites with template systems and SEF URL's I use the multivariate option with a single variation rather than the A/B test which forces a redirect to a static page. I've also ran multivariate tests with 8 variations of a single pages content. I would use GWO as Google will ...


1

WebsiteOptimiser redirects to your a/b test cases, so Google itself should be ok, but... I add exclusion rules to robots.txt, as it is possible (albeit not that likely) that someone goes to your site whilst you're testing, and reposts the link ./index_b.php to their blog etc, from which point your split test URL is likely to be crawled. So much depends on ...


1

Not enough experiments or divergence in the results to be statistically significant yet. Try doing a Google search on AB Testing confidence and work out what sort of confidence level you're at with your experiment. This will give you a much better idea of whether your results are significant or whether you should just let the experiment run longer. ...


1

Sites like acid cow, bored.com etc are worth aproaching to see if they will take up your punchline. short of that its really down to if your site is funny/engaging enough. One thing that might work is getting your punchine to be spread by some influential social media users and forum mods etc...


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it's a mystery how they ever get so popular For humor,* word of mouth online (digg.com, reddit.com, stumbleupon.com, community forums, and e-mail) and offline ("did you hear about ...") is all it takes to get people talking about the "punch line" (a.k.a. the "meme") and drive traffic. Note: The same cannot be said for most other categories of web ...



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