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Nowadays Google prefers to index HTTPS:// when given the option of both SSL and non-SSL. To avoid the HTTPS being indexed, but accessible to users you can select one of the options below. Canonical Links By far the best solution is to use canonical links, this will tell Google the preferred URL for both their crawler and users. Header No Index ...


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Apparently, everyone was sick and tired with receiving useless Googlebot-Mobile traffic, and must have had it blocked, such that Google has decided to ignore the relevant robots.txt entries, giving us less choice of what to allow and not allow. http://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/1061943 ...


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Robots.txt Google on occasions has been known to ignore robots.txt, it should never be treated as a guarantee. Sensitive pages should always some of form of authentication, or you could opt to block those user agents by returning a 403 forbidden status. However, this is not the issue. Google Probing Googlebot is known to probe sites with different user ...


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What shoud I do in this situation? I suppose completely remove all hreflangs from / version? This will eleminate the errors but is not the best choice for dealing whith your multi-language website. Your Website actually has two languages available: EN and RU. You decided to make use of language directories which is good. Actually there is no need of ...


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Sometimes when I do comparisons, I see a ~ as a value. It appears to indicate that the value is "not available". From Search Console Help - Search Analytics Report - Comparing your data: If you compare two groups, and a value is very rare in one group but not rare in the other group, the rare group will show ~ for that row to indicate that the ...


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It's a mathematical symbol meaning "approximately". For instance, "there are ~10,000 URLs on my website".


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In short, it's "a multitude of factors". Here's the longer version: We’ve ranked the errors so that those at the top of the priority list will be ones where there’s something you can do, whether that’s fixing broken links on your own site, fixing bugs in your server software, updating your Sitemaps to prune dead URLs, or adding a 301 redirect to ...


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For some reason Google thinks your client's website is a relevant website when someone searches for bad-keyword. This works in the exact same way as trying to score good for keyword, the websites content and titles and other SEO valuable items score high in relevance. Apparently this site provides good results for this keyword, other than rewriting the ...


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I've run into various problems with GWT over the past few years and the answer to my question is always "There's a reporting error" or "GWT data is made to be inaccurate". What's the point of using such a tool if it's so unreliable? I think reliability here has to do with how quick you expect results and how large your site is. Google's robots deals ...


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GWT is a job unto itself. It may be someone's full-time job. There are lots of ins-and-outs and I don't expect someone to just sit down and make it give you what you want. You need to study how it works and learn to code it. There is a ton of data and doing it wrong will give you the wrong data. I don't believe the data is wrong. It's just how it's put ...


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No it is not. What's the point of using such a tool if it's so unreliable? [...] why use it at all? Shouldn't Google be giving webmasters accurate data on the performance of their website? First of all please remember that GSC is a free tool. If you want reliable data and insights you may need to pay for professional tools. You state that the ...


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It's a reporting bug that's happened to many people, where the number of indexed URLs shown in the sitemaps feature in Google Search Console isn't representative of the actual number of indexed pages. There's no actual problem and the pages are indexed, as can be confirmed by checking the Index Status feature.


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The code seems in order. But one of the guidelines for use of AggregateRating "Make sure the reviews and ratings you mark up are readily available to users from the marked-up page. It should be immediately obvious to users that the page has review or ratings content." Reviews, I suppose, aren't present on the website. And I am guessing that you don't link ...


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This happened to my website once. I have submitted about 80K URLs and Google indexed about 72K URLS. Later it slowly removed most of the pages. What I found is that the pages which I have submitted has thin content. And also, Poor architecture might be secondary reason. So check if all pages having unique and sufficient content and resubmit.


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Your mistaken, Google can see your code, in the fetch test you are suppose to have a horizontal scroll bar and in the screenshot you do not, which would indicate a browser issue, not a Google, or website. Also, the reason you can see your friends code is because his code is clean (beautified) and yours is a mess. If you fix your browser issue, or use a ...


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As Google clearly says, you should add all versions of your site as follows http://example.com http://www.example.com and the 2 https versions. What does "... site supports ..." mean? Well, it means whatever URLs are supported by your site i.e. are served by your site. Google will treat each of them differently and you have to keep checking all the four ...


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You can use the Remove Outdated Content tool in Search Console. Submit the URL and click through the dialogue box: Has the page been removed or updated? Yes. Click "Next", and select "The snippet and cache are outdated." Sometimes this issue can be traced to a specific cause, but often it's simply a glitch on Google's part. I suspect the latter's the ...


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No, there's no need to re-submit for the SSL domain. You've already disavowed links for the HTTP version; in other words they're no longer taken "into account when [Google] assesses your site". Consequently, the negative effect can't be passed to the the new site (HTTPS): it's already been dealt with. The fact that subdomains and protocols are added ...


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Interestingly, while I get the same "Traduire cette page" link from google.fr, on visiting the page (my browser is set to British English) Chrome tells me the page is in French and offers to translate it. The browser function allows you to report errors. I can't be sure that errors reported here will affect search results, but it's certainly worth a ...


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This is a difficult question to answer simply because there is no direct answer to this question. So let's see if we can work through the process. Let's assume a few things. The first of which is a blanket 301 redirect from one site, HTTP, to another, HTTPS. The second is that there are links to the HTTP site and not to the HTTPS site. What we know. The ...


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In the disavow file, domain:example.com covers all cases of www cname(s) and all subdomains, under http:// and https://. So no matter what their domain runs as, or what subs are running, it'll be disavowed https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/2648487?hl=en says: If you want Google to ignore all links from an entire domain (like example.com), ...


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The answer is - which one is Google indexing? It will only index one version. That's the one you disavow. Do it with the root domain (domain:example.com) and you don't even need to specify a protocol.



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