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Before establishing a URL format, you want to take a look at your back-end to see that it can actually handle the format. If your server is apache, you'll likely be using rewrite rules with the mod_rewrite module. Also, you will have to feed the format into a dynamic script. Let me explain. Say you are using the query of four items named item1, item2, item3 ...


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I would consider separating the parameter and value by directories and using dashes. e.g. /search/category/a-b-c/price/2000-3000/ I'd say the URL structure is a smaller concern than the duplication issues which may arise. Ensure you have canonical tags for handling: /search/category/a-b-c/price/2000-3000/ /search/category/a-b-c/price/3000-2000/ ...


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Having "pretty permalinks" show up with search is one thing, having the countless search results pages fed to google is another - it's better to even noindex them.


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Did a little research on this, it seems using + is a common practice when it comes to multi category URL. Some webmasters who have used this method recommend it. Example: /search/(category-a)+(category-b)/...


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inside an tag is an error syntax :P


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Google looks for such information in traditional places such as About, Contact, Company Info, the sites header, or the sites footer. This began in the early days of semantics where specific information from any website was collected to better help match search intent with entities, locale, and persons. The home page is a good place for this, but is not ...


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Button size can affect the usability of the website. Meaning, if the button is too small, users won't love to stay longer on your site, leading to a higher bounce rate. Google might consider that the user wasn't able to find what he is looking for on the website. This is just one of the factors. Just remember that your site must be able to pass Google's ...


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Button size doesn't matter but the margins around them, AKA how far they are away from other tap targets does. How much does it matter? Not much. We have various warns about this too for a couple widgets, but frankly it's fine, and we are not gonna fix it. Still ranks, still get the mobile tag. Now if your whole template was full of these, it would be ...


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In principle, it should not make a difference. While itemReviewed and review are not inverse properties (because itemReviewed can also be used for ratings, not only reviews), they mean essentially the same thing in your examples. However, it’s conceivable that a consumer would only support (or: look for) one of the properties, e.g., because the other one is ...


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I think it's important to clarify context. As suggested in comments, the linked article refers to tap-targets on mobile/touch devices... roughly 7mm, or 48 CSS pixels on a site with a properly-set mobile viewport. "48 CSS pixels ... with a properly-set mobile viewport" does not necessarily mean 48 literal screen pixels, since a "CSS pixel" is relative ...


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The downside of Google is you can never now for sure because they like their secrets, and the size of the operation makes it difficult to be sure that the system works even in the way they think it does. But in this case probably yes. It is possible to get messages in webmaster tools along these lines: Google systems have tested 137,000 pages from your ...


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Theres a chance you'll be in the bad books with Google. It all depends on what the resulting screen looks like to various users when you're done. For example, if you create a super simple page where each character in the title (H1 tag) are at least an inch high in height and you use a couple of breaks (BR tags) inside it, then most of the content of the ...


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It can be appropriate to use br in heading elements. An example from the HTML5 spec: <h1>Ramones <br> <span>Hey! Ho! Let's Go</span> </h1> If it’s appropriate in your case depends on your actual content (a heading listing three keywords is most likely not a good idea in the first place). However, even for inappropriate uses ...


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I think what has happened here is that the other website has stolen your website's content, and passing it off as it's own. If you do a ping request on that website's URL it's IP address is should be different to your own website's IP address. I would message Google via Google Webmaster Tools and inform them of the other website and they will act ...


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There is no reason to assume that Google Search would punish a page if the page’s navigation is not using ul. Using ul for navigation is good for various reasons, but the ranking in search engines is most likely not one of them. That Google Search is showing "LoremIpsumDolorSitAmet" in your result snippet is maybe because you are not using block-level ...


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You should keep the dates in some way or another, even for "evergreen" content. I never figured out how (its not header, schema, nor meta), but certain SaaS are able to push a modified date to Google SERPS resulting in a way fresh date indicator. Maybe its RSS somehow, but I dont think...it must be similar structure to so many sites. Anyways, even if the ...


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Adding to what closetnoc already said, we can take 2 examples directly from Google: https://developers.google.com/structured-data/?rd=1 Look at the bottom. The structured data itemprop="datePublished" wraps the Last Updated Date, not the date of when it was first published (it's not even there). Examples of when freshness matters and when not If I ...


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Dates within the content are really not used. Exceptions in the past has been when a pages creation and modification dates cannot be determined through ordinary means. Google, for example, gets it's creation date from the date the page was discovered. If the page changes and the changes are not superficial, then Google will note that as a modification date. ...


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When you add your site to Search Console, it may take some time before diagnostic and other data is available. This is normal; it can take some time for Search Console to gather and process data for your site. In general, if you see a "No data yet" message, check back later. Once Google starts crawling your site more often, you'll notice that Search ...


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Us too, Google has pretty much given up on our product pages in lieu of categories instead. Here are a few thoughts on how/why this could happen: Your category descriptions are too good - it's too good of a lander. Most people pimp out the categories and put lesser effort into the product descriptions. Or perhaps the product descriptions are too similar ...


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Perhaps you don't understand how google image search works. Like regular google searches it will return all results for the search word/phrase. So unless your name or search is unique there will be multiple results. If you are searching for your image by name there are a few things you ought be aware of. Is there actually an image with your name ...


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Yes, Google can do that and it is best to assume that anything that is publicly available on the internet may be indexed by Google. Linked to or not. Of course, if you don't link to it the chances of it being indexed go way down. However, Google uses a multitude of tools to gather URLs for indexing. Recently there was a news item about Dropbox links that ...


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Think of the linking as a chain reaction. Google won't link to domains if it has no way of accessing it or even finding it. If a friend advertises your URL on a popular forum site that Google always indexes, then there's a chance Google will scan your URL and possibly index it, thinking the link may be part of the site. Is the fact I've installed ...


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There's no violation of any sort for just being on multiple ranking in the first page. Here's an example If there isn't any sort of spamming, backlink abuse or other blackhat practice, it's completely legit. Here's some words from Matt Cutts that answer all your doubts. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sxv-AvNPoh8 As he said, if a domain has very high ...


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You can force Google to look for a word by putting it in quotes: "only" in incognito “Only”, however, is a very general word, so that won’t work. Instead, you need to build larger groups and force Google to search for them literally: "only in incognito" You’ll want to make these as short as possible, because there are many ways to write stuff that ...


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Is every single page different? Let's say there were pages with the same content on both domains, for instance information about your company, with the only difference being the .jp's company information is in Japanese while the .com's company information is in English - in this case, you could use the hreflang annotation to further help Google find and ...


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That is going to happen to at least some point without your having to do anything. Google uses a load-balancing mechanism to load different Google sites according to the audience. It would not make sense for a data center to serve sites and pages that a portion of the world is not looking for or in a language that is not understood. The .com site will have a ...



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