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You need to check the server side source code of the page on the server and look for code that does not belong. Even though you tested a few different user agents, it is trivial to make a dynamic page show different content to various users based on any factor. A hacker could also make it only happen at certain times of day, etc. Until you've checked the ...


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Okay. I just read the article and watched the video and the article is rather misleading. It is, while a milder form, a misunderstanding of what Matt Cutts was saying. This happens often even by experts in the field. One needs to listen to what Matt says carefully and not read into what is said too much. Often, people hear what they want to hear and run with ...


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There are two things you have to keep in your mind: The easier to remember, the better you have to be able to remove each part in the url without breaking it This makes your 3 examples rather easy: A http://www.example.com/category/sub-category/sub-sub-category/article/ID B http://www.example.com/ID/category/sub-category/sub-sub-category/article C ...


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You say you have checked Google's multilingual guidelines pages, but have you implemented the rel="alternate" hreflang= mark up, either on the pages source code or in sitemaps? If not you should do that, as it can help Google discover and understand the connection between your translated pages. If you haven't already, make sure all your URLs are in a ...


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Since this is an AJAX application anyway, write the data into the pages separately from your escaped fragments. Users would generate two AJAX requests: GET /fragment?id=12345 that would contain the text and HTML for the screen with a placeholder for the data GET /data?id=12345 that would be the actual data to write into the screen (maybe the data would ...


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In my opinion, you shouldn’t serve different content for users and search engines; it’s called cloaking and as you most probably know, it’s a bad SEO practice. And even if you don’t want to manipulate search engines results, I think Google bots couldn’t make any difference; as you know, they’re only bots. When you say search engines wouldn’t care about fake ...


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Instead of using just the canonical tag on both pages, use the annotations for desktop and mobile URLs. On the desktop page, add: <link rel="alternate" media="only screen and (max-width: 640px)" href="http://example.com/?mobile=1" > and on the mobile page, add the canonical tag: <link rel="canonical" href="http://www.example.com/" > ...


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Some things you can do: a. 301 redirect all URLs, so that .ac.uk/anything goes to .co.uk/anything (yes, including /sitemap.xml, /robots.txt, etc. The one exception could be your Google Webmaster verification file, but it's probably easier to handle verification through DNS in this case). b. Use Google Webmaster Change of Address tool c. Try to change as ...


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I don't think that Google have ever stated that bounce rate is a ranking factor. However, my personal belief is that "click back" rates are a factor, simply because it would be too useful a metric for Google to ignore. User receives a link 1hr before the webinar starts In this case, the user isn't actually arriving from Google's search results. Thus, ...


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The amount of time that users spend on your site after clicking on a webinar link that has been sent to them via email will in no way change your Google rankings. Here is a video by Google's Matt Cutts where he addresses whether or not Google uses Google Analytics data as a ranking factor. The answer is "no". Google does care about the experience its ...


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You can choose any URL structure, thereby making sure that they are clean enough to understand. Personally, I would prefer location first because i would be knowing the location where i am going and then the restaurants and i have checked many of your competitors are also using the same structure.


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Search engines will rank the keyword nearest to the domain as the most important, and the keyword nearest to the domain should be the one that's most important to the user. As such, given you're saying in theory you're comparable to Yelp, then my position is that location should be first.


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In your case, it does not matter which order you choose regarding SEO. To make indexation more efficient, don't forget to include the location in your title meta tag. It helps.


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The appropriate way to do this is to use the the rel=canonical attribute on your page. This will identify one source URL for your content. For example: <link rel="canonical" href="http://blog.example.com/dresses/green-dresses-are-awesome" /> Google acknowledges this issue in a write up found here: ...


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If you are looking at structures like this it is really a case of which type of taxonomy works best for you. I would usually default to putting the L2 (category) landing page as the first part of the structure. So if you have a "Restaurants" page go from /restaurants/location/; if you have a "New York" page then go /new-york/restaurant/. If you have ...


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I don't think there is necessarily a right or wrong answer here, but thinking about it logically, if i'm looking for a restaurant, I would most likely be looking for one within a certain local area. So with that in mind, I'd say www.example.com/new-york/restaurants/abc-restaurant would be the most logical and user friendly approach. You might want to ...



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