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Google will attempt to find out by itself whether or not these query string parameters are showing new content, or are just used for tracking and do nothing to the page. However, you can specify how Google should handle parameters via webmastertools. Go to Crawl --> URL Parameters, and then you will see the parameters that google recognized (you can also ...


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Indexing rate is a function of how often the content changes, how valuable the content is in the eyes of search engines and how many valuable backlinks there is to your site. If some of your content is duplicate or near duplicate, then it is unlikely to be indexed, no matter what. You need to use canonical wherever possible for such content. Besides, get ...


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Google actually prefers 404 pages when pages no longer exist. There was a bit of a campaign waged by Google to replace redirects with 404 errors. But that whole effort rather fell flat. Thankfully. In a traditional sense, when a page is removed, the web server issues a 404 error. I worked with CMS software a long time ago, and this was also true then. If ...


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If you are using IIS, you can add IIS rewrite rules to your web.config to specify which type of robots.txt to return, depending on the subdomain the user (and thus the crawler) is browsing to. You can specify special HTTP_HOST pattern conditions to specify which robots.txt file should be used for which domain. An article which explains this perfectly: ...


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Yes you are correct. When searching for content in Google the site at the top of the search results is considered the Authoritative (least in Googles eyes) source of the content. This doesn't necessarily mean the original source, Google sometimes gets it wrong, but the most part is pretty accurate at figuring out the original source. If doing a search for ...


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Use CopyScape http://www.copyscape.com/ It will show you what part, and what percent of the text is copied from other sources. Of course no content can be 100% original. Paraphrasing is not an illegal thing and is an integral part of content writing. But it's about the total percent of the text on a specific web page. Note that with the tool above you will ...


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No it simply ignores the information you have provided when it is incorrect. In this case, web crawlers figure out by themselves how often they should crawl your pages.


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We did something like this on a one page site, where each section of the site was served up via Ajax and cachable as its own url. We did this by using the #! hashbang method and then using the escaped fragment meta tag to let google know about the section pages. When the bot hit our site with the escaped fragment querystring we only served the bot that ...


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I think you may refer to sitelinks. They are automatically generated by Google. We only show sitelinks for results when we think they'll be useful to the user. If the structure of your site doesn't allow our algorithms to find good sitelinks, or we don't think that the sitelinks for your site are relevant for the user's query, we won't show them. ...


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Unfortunately, Google decides in which cases your site has sitelinks and which cases has not. And it's most probably Google sees word1word2 as two separate words even if it's your brand name. In a domain name, keywords are necessarily sticked; that's why Google tries to separate keywords to show up your site in SERPs when it's relevant (in relation to ...


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Rich snippets should improve search results overall (see Google's explanation, here: https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/99170?hl=en), and they do give you some control over what gets returned from a Google search, including a site search. As already noted, for site search this will be independent of your domain's general ranking. Likewise, ...


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You might be better off coding search results for you e-commerce site yourself. reasons. your returned results can also search you db for items site search would never know about. for example you might want to show what is most popular first? or better show what results in most conversions and profits. with site search you are not going to get sort by ...


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As long as the alias pulls up a valid web page, Google will be able to crawl it. You just need to make that URL available to them, most likely though an XML sitemap if the URL will not be available on your website. The problem you're going to have is duplicate content. You'll have two URLs pulling up the same content which is exactly what Google doesn't ...


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This seems to be the way Google works. You cannot speed up Google and patience is something even an already patient man learns. Google will fetch a few pages to test download speed and then fetch a larger amount for a period. It seems based on what I have seen over the years that Google will fetch in chunks as great as about 40,000 - 50,000 pages per day ...


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Do you have a DMOZ entry? I recently had the same problem where Google was pulling what I thought was the old meta description. After much hair pulling I found out there was an old DMOZ entry for the site and Google was using the meta description from the DMOZ description. If you ever have this issue. you can use the following meta tag to tell search ...


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I recently removed all the meta description tags How "recently"? It can take some time before changes are reflected in the SERPs. ...the site was indexed after I uploaded it. I think you mean the site was crawled after you updated it. Being crawled and indexed (when your pages actually appear in the SERPs) are two different things. ...The ...


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Keep in mind Google needs to crawl it a couple time's before Google shows the updated results. As Dan mentioned - you can speed it up by forcing Google to crawl the page (but it's impossible to say just how much that helps). Be patient - not a huge deal.


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Google often uses the description meta-tag for the snippet in the SERPs but that is not guaranteed though can be often counted on. If you are using a description meta-tag and are not pleased by what you see in the SERPs then simply change the description meta-tag. However, if the description meta-tag is empty or missing, you are leaving it up to Google to ...


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Meta tags are considered one of the least effective (possibly not all all effective) forms of on-site SEO. Don't worry about it. Focus on building content and links. Regarding your code, there is no way for us to help without seeing all of your code.


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Google have a guide here as to how they handle adaptive and responsive design, including "Dynamically serving different HTML on the same URL": https://developers.google.com/webmasters/smartphone-sites/details In your case, it sounds like you just need to add Vary: User-Agent to your header.


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According to Schema.org: The image property expects a URL or an ImageObject item. In Microdata, URLs must be specified with one of the HTML elements that take a URL as value. Among them is a (with its href attribute). So it should be possible to use: <a itemprop="image" href="http://example.com/my-product-image.png">…</a> Using custom ...


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If all your page titles are too similar, they may also choose to use the text from somewhere else on the page. Make sure all the pages have different descriptions, and that description relates to other content on the page so that it is seen as relevant to what the page is about. Also: 3 days doesn't seem long. You've told them that the site needs ...


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Yes, creating new pages help SEO of the homepage because they link to it. Indeed, when Googlebot discovers a new page, it affects a SEO value to it and by linking the homepage (often with logo of the website), you give it SEO value. Now, having a lot of content in the homepage is most probably is good thing because this is the most important page of a site ...


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Wow. This is too big a topic to cover completely, so I will try and focus on your question with something of a mini-tutorial. When you do a site:mydomain.com in Google, you will see your site listed somewhat in order of importance according to what Google has found. Often your sites home page is listed first, but not always. If it is not, do not worry about ...


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I would say it is pretty likely your site has an algorithmic 'penalty'. The content is non-original low quality and a typical panda target. If you posted the same question in the Google Webmaster Forum, then I am sure you would be told much the same. Some information on panda : ...


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Your search results depends on the location from where your are searching. Google search engine prefers to show local results primarily. The result shown in the is quite obvious as the content in the result pages is related to members of ottawa and dating information in Ottawa. So these results are relevant according to Google and hence have show at the ...



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