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4

Dates within the content are really not used. Exceptions in the past has been when a pages creation and modification dates cannot be determined through ordinary means. Google, for example, gets it's creation date from the date the page was discovered. If the page changes and the changes are not superficial, then Google will note that as a modification date. ...


4

It's likely due to the fact that the breadcrumb meta data is included on the page twice. As you can see in the source code from your website, the breadcrumb RDFa metadata is included twice, at two different points. One before the main content, and again afterwards. Remove one instance (probably the later one should be removed) and you should be good.


3

I think what has happened here is that the other website has stolen your website's content, and passing it off as it's own. If you do a ping request on that website's URL it's IP address is should be different to your own website's IP address. I would message Google via Google Webmaster Tools and inform them of the other website and they will act ...


3

That is going to happen to at least some point without your having to do anything. Google uses a load-balancing mechanism to load different Google sites according to the audience. It would not make sense for a data center to serve sites and pages that a portion of the world is not looking for or in a language that is not understood. The .com site will have a ...


2

Perhaps you don't understand how google image search works. Like regular google searches it will return all results for the search word/phrase. So unless your name or search is unique there will be multiple results. If you are searching for your image by name there are a few things you ought be aware of. Is there actually an image with your name ...


2

There is no reason to assume that Google Search would punish a page if the page’s navigation is not using ul. Using ul for navigation is good for various reasons, but the ranking in search engines is most likely not one of them. That Google Search is showing "LoremIpsumDolorSitAmet" in your result snippet is maybe because you are not using block-level ...


2

You should keep the dates in some way or another, even for "evergreen" content. I never figured out how (its not header, schema, nor meta), but certain SaaS are able to push a modified date to Google SERPS resulting in a way fresh date indicator. Maybe its RSS somehow, but I dont think...it must be similar structure to so many sites. Anyways, even if the ...


2

Adding to what closetnoc already said, we can take 2 examples directly from Google: https://developers.google.com/structured-data/?rd=1 Look at the bottom. The structured data itemprop="datePublished" wraps the Last Updated Date, not the date of when it was first published (it's not even there). Examples of when freshness matters and when not If I ...


2

It can be appropriate to use br in heading elements. An example from the HTML5 spec: <h1>Ramones <br> <span>Hey! Ho! Let's Go</span> </h1> If it’s appropriate in your case depends on your actual content (a heading listing three keywords is most likely not a good idea in the first place). However, even for inappropriate uses ...


2

Unfortunately, if the old domain is completely lost then it's not possible to "preserve search engine ranking". Otherwise, what would stop anyone else from "preserving" your ranking? The only way is to re-register / renew the old domain and prove ownership by showing you can control the old domain (set-up redirects, verify in GWT, etc.) It's now serving ...


2

There's no violation of any sort for just being on multiple ranking in the first page. Here's an example If there isn't any sort of spamming, backlink abuse or other blackhat practice, it's completely legit. Here's some words from Matt Cutts that answer all your doubts. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sxv-AvNPoh8 As he said, if a domain has very high ...


1

Did a little research on this, it seems using + is a common practice when it comes to multi category URL. Some webmasters who have used this method recommend it. Example: /search/(category-a)+(category-b)/...


1

Google looks for such information in traditional places such as About, Contact, Company Info, the sites header, or the sites footer. This began in the early days of semantics where specific information from any website was collected to better help match search intent with entities, locale, and persons. The home page is a good place for this, but is not ...


1

In principle, it should not make a difference. While itemReviewed and review are not inverse properties (because itemReviewed can also be used for ratings, not only reviews), they mean essentially the same thing in your examples. However, it’s conceivable that a consumer would only support (or: look for) one of the properties, e.g., because the other one is ...


1

The downside of Google is you can never now for sure because they like their secrets, and the size of the operation makes it difficult to be sure that the system works even in the way they think it does. But in this case probably yes. It is possible to get messages in webmaster tools along these lines: Google systems have tested 137,000 pages from your ...


1

Is every single page different? Let's say there were pages with the same content on both domains, for instance information about your company, with the only difference being the .jp's company information is in Japanese while the .com's company information is in English - in this case, you could use the hreflang annotation to further help Google find and ...


1

Yes, Google can do that and it is best to assume that anything that is publicly available on the internet may be indexed by Google. Linked to or not. Of course, if you don't link to it the chances of it being indexed go way down. However, Google uses a multitude of tools to gather URLs for indexing. Recently there was a news item about Dropbox links that ...


1

Think of the linking as a chain reaction. Google won't link to domains if it has no way of accessing it or even finding it. If a friend advertises your URL on a popular forum site that Google always indexes, then there's a chance Google will scan your URL and possibly index it, thinking the link may be part of the site. Is the fact I've installed ...


1

We have a client with the unfortunate situation of losing access to their current domain name "A". We've just finished finished setting their website up on domain "B". Both websites on "A" and "B" are the same..... However, "A" is no longer available and we don't have access to renew it. It's now serving advertisement! That last word "same" ...


1

Us too, Google has pretty much given up on our product pages in lieu of categories instead. Here are a few thoughts on how/why this could happen: Your category descriptions are too good - it's too good of a lander. Most people pimp out the categories and put lesser effort into the product descriptions. Or perhaps the product descriptions are too similar ...



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