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23

It's built in. Page [paper] -> Developer -> Developer tools (in Chrome v5 and under). It is likely to be different in v6 since the Page button appears to be disappearing in that version.


15

Right-Click -> Inspect Element


13

Chrome uses the WebKit rendering engine. Firefox uses the Gecko engine. Both interpret and display type slightly differently, as do the DirectX and Vega graphics engines used in IE9+ and Opera. You can't force browsers to render text identically, but you can do a couple of things to ensure that your navigation takes up the same width across browsers: Use ...


12

Firebug Lite for Google Chrome.


12

Rawgithub.com allows users to take the "Raw" versions of a Git and turn it into a URL usable in <script> tags. It's quite easy to use, simply remove the first . from the raw URL. For example, this: https://raw.github.com/joelambert/CSS-Animation-Store/master/cssanimationstore.js would turn into this ...


10

By far the easiest method is to use an online tool. GIDZipTest shows you plenty of detail: the original size, compressed size and compression percentage. However, it is possible in Chrome with a bit of effort. (Updated for latest Chrome, Sept 2011.) In the Developer Tools, go to the "Network" tab and reload the page. You will see a list of all the files ...


8

Basically it started because some websites used to sniff the user-agent to tell what browser someone was using so they could block browsers that they thought wouldn't work with their websites. Specifically, websites were blocking Internet Explorer because it didn't offer as many features as Netscape Navigator. Instead of simply building a website that works ...


8

You must type (not copy-paste) the entire Javascript (including "javascript:") into the address bar to execute Javascript - Chrome will strip the "javascript:" protocol specification and treat your Javascript as a search if your last action in the address bar is copy-pasting. A more convenient way to execute arbitrary Javascript in Chrome would be to open ...


8

Ironically the answer is on this page and every other Stack Exchange site :) You have to define an OpenSearchDescription for your site. If you look at the source code of this page you will see in the header: <link rel="search" type="application/opensearchdescription+xml" title="Pro Webmasters - Stack Exchange" href="/opensearch.xml"> And if you ...


8

The problem you have is out of your control since this is how the hosting is setup at Github on the path that you have mentioned, Extension type is not only the factor when it comes to executing files since the web hosting can over-rule how a browser renders a file. You could have a .zip file rendering as a .html file if the host was setup to do so, you can ...


6

This is a known issue. Please see Chromium issue #44872.


5

Actually, Spidermonkey (FF) and V8 (Chrome) are very similar in the core javascript engine API in that both try to be standards compliant. The main difference is that Spidermonkey tends to add some nice extras to their API if they feel it is needed. All of this is found at the Mozilla Development Center (MDC) for JavaScript and well documented if it is not ...


5

Differences in font rendering between different browsers (and on different operating systems) is a fact of life. You just have to make sure that if the font displays at different widths your design can still cope.


5

You are sending the Content-Type: application/octet-stream header, presumably hoping to trigger the browser to download the file instead of letting the user view it. This however is not really the best way. You are better of with sending the correct content type and add a content disposition header, like so: Content-Type: video/mp4 Content-Disposition: ...


5

The file extension is irrelevant, it's the Content-Type header that matters, and that file is served with a text/plain content type (which is the purpose of Github's "raw" view). You should really download a copy of the file locally to your site and include it from there. Even if it did work from Github, since you're not loading the JS file asynchronously, ...


4

I tried it and it works perfectly for me. Note that the color and font-size properties won't have any effect in Chrome, since no text gets displayed. (Firefox displays the alt text if the image cannot be found.) Using the width property, for example, shows that it works fine. I'll post my code below for you to see. However, to your original question, ...


4

I have an application that has started seeing this issue around noon on Nov 20, 2014 (Eastern), with near the exact same issues mentioned. I was able to connect with one of our users who indicated she was using the Hola.org plugin and I was then able to reproduce the error after installing it myself on Chrome. Funny thing is although my site was ...


3

There are certainly differences. Looking at just the rendering front, Safari and Chrome will inevitably use different versions of Webkit (it's development is pretty fast-moving). Any differences are likely to be minor, though. Besides rendering, there is also Javascript to think about and minor things like font differences and platform differences (Safari ...


3

The in-browser tools are great at their job and are usually your best first choice, but sometimes they don't provide enough technical detail on the HTTP request/response payloads, or are too page-specific. In these cases, you may find that a dedicated HTTP inspection tool like Fiddler or one of the Linux alternatives will provide more insight. If you ...


3

It's been 4 years since the original question was asked. Chrome (stable) is now at version 38. For a long time it has included a full set of Developer Tools that are roughly equivalent to Firebug for Firefox (though incidentally Firefox even has a built-in inspector too). A few things Chrome's Developer Tools allow you to do: Inspect the DOM Inspect CSS ...


3

It all depends on what part of the world. Overall, yes Opera is the least used browser, but there are places like the Ukraine and Belarus, it's the most used browser. You can see some stats here: http://gs.statcounter.com/ Also, Opera is used a lot on mobile and console devices because of their compression services. In my opinion, I think the 2 biggest ...


3

The biggest problem in using mixed content is, that (without preventing it explicitely) cookies are sent to both requests. That means, a session cookie which should be used with a secure HTTPS connection, will be sent also to an unsecure HTTP page request, or even for a request of a picture. If an attacker can read this session cookie, he can access the ...


3

I'm afraid you have misunderstood the function of the tag. <meta name="google" value="notranslate"> only prevents google from showing the 'translate this page option' in their search results, it has no effect on Chrome's translation functionality. If you specify the page language correctly, Chrome won't offer to translate the page for users with ...


3

This is a good article going over what information Google collects using Chrome, though out dated i'm sure the same tests can be tried today to see if any information is being collected when clicking on links http://blog.nektra.com/main/2008/10/15/the-truth-about-google-chrome-using-spy-studio/ You may want to try the test yourself using Wire Shark and ...


3

This can be annoying. The reason this happens is because the browser treats the # in the url as an anchor and then tries to find the html element who has an id that matches that anchor. Eduardos answer about using Javascript is the solution. You can use jquery or javascript to change the url hash when a link is clicked to something that does not exist. ...


3

It's never a good idea. Chrome and Firefox (and for some feature IE10+ as well) have an excellent support of recent standard. One thing that could produce differents results is the different interpretations of errors (not-closed html tag, use of not standard calls or prefixes -webkit-) So if you have some error (visual or logic) it's reasonable to think ...


3

As correctly noted by others, you should not demand that the users use a specific application to visit your website (even a Chromium user may visit your website from different devices with different browsers). In general, you should check your website's rendering on all major browsers (Firefox, Chromium, IE, Safari, Opera). If you use a specific new ...


3

Firefox has an extension to enable/disable html5. I think it would be exactly what you are looking for if you are willing to your testing on Firefox. It is called HTML5toggle. Its description is: Turn on or off browser support for HTML5


3

The culprit was in fact me. I had earlier installed a smaller subset of this font on my machine. Firefox and Internet Explorer (this is as far as I have checked) are rendering a font from the system, yet Chrome downloads the font even if you already have it.


2

If you write a jQuery app, you don't need to worry about anything as you are developing to a framework/library that does (today) and will continue to do (in future versions) everything under the hood. if you are writting plain javascript, then it's all a mess :) as you need not to develop your app in one browser but to test in all other browsers, and ...



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