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Scenario 1: IPv4 only Simple. Scenario 2: IPv6 only Simple. Scenario 3: IPv4 + IPv6 dual stack client AND IPv4 server Client will fetch resources from server using IPv4. Client will hit Google Analytics using IPv6. IPv6 Filtering Conclusion Google Analytics will always abbreviate/shorthand the IPv6 address, so the corresponding filter must also ...


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The simplest way around it would be to create an audience segment that excludes that particular transaction from any of the reports. You can find how to create new segments here: http://support.google.com/analytics/answer/3124493 In this case you would go to E-commerece, and then select Transactions that don't include 1001581. Then whenever anyone needs ...


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I am struggling with GA too. I cannot find the query string parameters in IE, but I can use the Developer Tool in Chrome. Click the Network tab and filter the GIF file sent to Google server, then click the name of GIF file and click on the header. On the bottom you can see Query String Parameters that lists all the parameters. Then you can compare that with ...


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The Reverse Goal Path section in GA shows this information. Conversions > Goals > Reverse Goal Path


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Universal Analytics code alone isn't enough. You need to either set the Advertising Features in your settings or in your code itself. Have you gone into the Admin Property settings and enabled this, as explained in the link i shared in my comment above?


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The Time on Page metric is an average of all the page views by the same or multiple users' sessions on that individual page. What you need is drilldown to just the particular page you are measuring and view the time spent on page metric on there. Keep in mind that users who go to just one page normally skew that metric. If you want a true count, you ...


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Google was forced to show this when the EU regulators got very antsy about data protection and gave them a deadline to sort out how they use customer data and declare that usage. ZDNet have a summary of the issue here and if you're really keen, you can read the whole ammendment here


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Google have answered this question for you: https://support.google.com/adsense/answer/6090783?hl=en-GB Might not exactly pinpoint the issue, but it really could be a whole lot of reasons. For one, are you absolutely certain that each and every pageview on your site is generating an ad impression?


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If you have access to that account it will show up in your Google Analytics home screen (UA-ID is displayed next to the name of a property). If your Google Account has no access to the Analytics account then knowing the UA-ID won't help, you will not have access to the data.


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Try to add as a Secondardy dimension Referral Path. It could be helpful. Probably these source /medium comes from custom UTMs defined to track some kind of traffic


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As of 2015 wikipedia uses https for all connections To ensure that Wikipedia users can share in the world’s knowledge more securely, the Wikimedia Foundation is implementing HTTPS, to encrypt all traffic on Wikimedia sites. http://blog.wikimedia.org/2015/06/12/securing-wikimedia-sites-with-https/ Linking from secure connections to non-https sites ...


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We place this in our webshops <head /> <link rel="next" href="some-url/?page=3" /> <link rel="prev" href="some-url/?page=1" /> This indicated there are multiple pages of this result. We only want the first page ranked, and the others to be crawled and that exactly what's happening. Because of this, GA never requires us to specify that ...


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Try escaping all the special characters in the expression www\.event\-tracking\.com|Get\-Free\-Traffic\-Now\.com There shouldn't be a problem filtering any referral if the expression matches it. Have you tried using a valid hostname filter instead. One thing that all ghost spam have in common is that they use either a fake hostname or they leave it as ...


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You will need to create a series of filters (as they are applied in the order they are created): Filter 1: Your first filter will build the "<browser>/<browser version>" string: Custom > Advanced Field A, Browser, (.*)( Field B, Browser Version, (.*) Output, Custom Field 1, $A1:$B1 Filter 2: Your second filter will filter only the direct ...


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I'm not sure if there is a "proper" way, but since you're using analytics, you're likely using adsense as well. Go in google adsense and create a new ad unit and place it on the specific page you want to track. Then wait about a week or until a large chunk of traffic has gone through your site, then revisit adsense and check the performance reports tab. If ...


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It is possible (altough I'm not sure it's a good idea). You need to be careful, though - the tracker created by gtm is a named tracker (with an arbitrarly named tracker that starts with gtm..). The tracker in your ecommerce conversion page is probably the default tracker (named t0) and will start a new session, even if it tracks to the same property. So in ...


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That is likely due to referral spam. A spammer is likely using your Google Analytics tracking ID so that activities on their own website end up getting recorded in your own Analytics account. To check, assign "hostname" as your secondary dimension when checking your data and you will see which website is actually the culprit. To get rid of your spam data ...


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Copy pasting this in (cf: https://support.google.com/analytics/answer/1257084?hl=en): Analytics measures both sessions and users in your account. Sessions represent the number of individual sessions initiated by all the users to your site. If a user is inactive on your site for 30 minutes or more, any future activity is attributed to a new session. Users ...


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Potentially, any external stylesheet is render blocking. For the browser to render the page correctly, all the HTML and all the relevant stylesheet(s) need to be loaded. (A stylesheet is not "relevant" if you are using media queries and the condition fails.) The browser does not render the page when only the HTML and embedded/inlined styles are loaded. It ...


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I think that the most important point is that creating a local copy of that file is totally counterproductive. The reason is very simple. The file comes in two versions (ga.js and the older analytics.js) and can be served over 2 protocols (HTTP and HTTPS). This means that the browser only ever needs to keep at most 4 cache entries, irrespective of the number ...


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Give them (read-only) access to the account. Anything less and some may be tempted to suspect that you're fudging the numbers. If they aren't able to handle analytics, make them nice powerpoints, but let them know they have access to the raw data anyway.


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If anyone ever comes across this same question, I found a strategy that helped me out. I used Screaming Frog and set up custom filters to contain the tags that were in my Analytics and Tag Manager accounts. Then I just crawled my website and it returned all the pages that contained the tags that I set up.


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Approve? Well, they don't recommend it. The major downside of this is updates. If they update, you don't get it because you downloaded. This can result in broken of faulty statistics. https://support.google.com/analytics/answer/1032389?hl=en



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