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10

Good News! Since 8.3 (Dec 2015) GitLab has "GitLab Pages". https://about.gitlab.com/2015/12/22/gitlab-8-3-released/ This feature is available on GitLab.com (which runs EE) where you can have free, unlimited repositories, public/private. Here is documentation for GitLab Pages, explaining how you can host for free your static websites on GitLab. http://...


5

There are some websites which have videos on how to use various web development components. Here is an alphabetized list of places, where one can watch a series of videos on various programming subjects: https://www.codeschool.com https://www.lynda.com https://www.khanacademy.org https://www.youtube.com (Simply search for Git or Gulp, Web Development, etc.....


4

You can easily split your http.conf file up into multiple files. Debian based systems (such as Ubuntu) come configured that way by default. To make that happen you can include lines like this in your main conf file: IncludeOptional sites-enabled/*.conf Then you can put each of your site's virtual host files into a separate file like sites-enabled/example....


4

It seems to me that you are doing things the hard way. Your httpd.conf file should not be large and there should only be one .htaccess file per site. As well, you are under the impression that .htaccess files are inefficient which is not really the case. Using config files requires the Apache server to be restarted in order for the configuration change to ...


4

There is a nodejs project that implements this: https://github.com/Glavin001/GitLab-Pages


4

I know this isn't what you asked about, but I have to fully agree with Su' in the comments: if your hosting provider doesn't give you SSH access, you should seriously start looking for a new provider. It's not so much about the lack of SSH as such, but about the fact that your current provider apparently isn't giving you what's nowadays considered a very ...


4

While the use of dependencies manager is really encouraged, because they do so much more than simply including remote repositories (minimum / maximum versions requirements, dependencies downloading, incompatibilities...), it exists several other solutions to include git repositories inside a main git repository. Each solution may be adequate depending on ...


3

I personally use Git for web development, and have adopted a method similar to this with our development server. I used Joe Maller's Web-Focused Git Workflow as a model, and it's been fairly successful. Joe's approach uses an intermediary "hub" repository that's been set up as a "bare" repository (git --bare init), because it's very tricky pushing into a ...


2

You'll probably want to branch your code or at the very least start using tags. I prefer the branch method so I can keep 2 copies of the site. One being my trunk version ( dev ) and another being the live production copy. Then I can just merge the changes to the production branch when I'm ready to publish and if something goes wrong on production I have a ...


2

Yes, the workflow makes sense. The only thing I don’t quite get is the need for a separate testing platform. I mean yeah, it’s useful if you have a testing team to give them their own platform, but if it's just you? Not so much. IMHO, for small-scale development teams, this sort of thing is unnecessary and becomes a hassle. I’m going to suggest the obvious ...


2

Your can add into httpd.conf container for <Directory>: AllowOverride None and affected .htaccess will be effectively ignored.


2

With a little searching of various questions on Google, I found a way. It may not be the best way and it may be over complicated, but it should work and that's the main thing. Though, if you know a better way or can find one, please do let me know! I found that you can deploy your code to your servers via Git hooks. All you need to do is SSH into your ...


2

I'm not really sure what you're asking. You say you want to host on your own server but your question says you want to host like gitlab pages which is not your own server. In any case maybe this will help This is what I do on local pc mkdir folderforwebsite cd folderforwebsite git init echo "hello world" > index.html git add index.html git commit -m "...


2

The tracking code on its own is not a security risk. Remember, anyone can see this simply by viewing the HTML source of your website. If you're putting your website code on Github because you think other people could use it, you shouldn't include your tracking code because you don't want their visitors to be logged to your account.


2

Okay have managed to figure this one out. Turns out there is no native feature in Git to trigger a remote fetch (as in pushing code to the repository and having the repository trigger a pull origin on the web server). The way I have resolved this was to upload a PHP script to my web server under the default vhost. Within that file I have it set to run ...


2

Install Node.js Install Gulp globally with npm install gulp-cli --global Make a new directory for your Gulp tasks and Sass files Inside that folder initialize npm with npm init Install Gulp and Sass with npm install gulp gulp-sass --save-dev Create a gulpfile.js with the following content: var gulp = require('gulp') var sass = require('gulp-sass') gulp....


2

MediaWiki has a storage abstraction layer that makes this technically possible (the linked page talks about using external databases but it's actually not limited to that; see the documentation of the ExternalStore class for details). You would have to write your own ExternalStoreMedium subclass. The wiki would still have an RDBMS backend, of course, but the ...


2

I think there isn't (using off-shelf software) for the following reasons. Sql and git are very different storage systems by design. Sql is about storing lots of deeply interconnected data in a single big lump of a file. Thus allowing efficient indexing and searching. Git is about storing programming text in many small files with the unwritten assumption ...


2

Saas is a flexible build system for CSS files. It allows you to add a little bit of logic to your CSS files as templates and make it easier to change certain values at build time. One example is where you want to change a font colour for a large number of elements, previous method was to go through the CSS file and change each CSS rule seperately and could ...


2

If you don't mind administrators being able to access those changes, the easiest is to revision-delete them: https://www.mediawiki.org/wiki/Help:RevisionDelete https://www.mediawiki.org/w/api.php?action=help&modules=revisiondelete If you are looking for a simple solution, you could try dropping entries from the revision table in the database (probably ...


1

The solution is to put everything on your website into git. Modify the files locally on your home machine. When you are ready to publish, push them to github and push them to your website over ssh. Here is a tutorial that walks you through cloning your git repository over SSH: https://www.siteground.com/tutorials/siteground-git/clone-git-repository.htm ...


1

You do this via git hooks. You can configure your git hosting service (bitbucket or github) to call a url everytime you do a git push. In essence you commit them push your changes to github/bitbucket and then those services do a request on a specific filename on your webserver. In my scenario I have bitbucket always call http://www.mydomain.com/git-...


1

Currently, the best you can do is to GitLab CI to push to a static server like Amazon S3. If you can deploy with Git, the following (unsolved) question is specific to how to do it with gitlab: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/14288288/gitlab-repository-mirroring There is a specific request for that at the feature tracker: http://feedback.gitlab.com/...


1

I think most sites use a simple cron job to copy the files to a backup server. However, git is becoming the norm as it allows you to easily branch development and revert to earlier versions. I think what you are doing is fine. Regarding the database, why not back it up directly? At least, if it's MySQL you can simply back up the folder containing the ...


1

There isn't a canonical backup process any more than there's a canonical web structure/organization. But you mention that the repo's gotten bloated due to temporary files. Add the files/directories involved to .gitignore and they should no longer be a factor. There's obviously no reason to save them.


1

Shameless self promotion, but I asked this question over at StackOverflow a couple of years ago "Does anyone know of a decent free online bug tracker for web development purposes?"


1

As stated by @Jacob Hume I'd have an intermediary repository, setup your own, use Github or Bitbucket. You are likely going to run into difficulty synchronizing your branches between multiple developers if you don't use a hub. I usually pull updates into a staging/testing server to make sure everything is working, then do the same for production.



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